Five Questions with … Anders Osborne

February 25th, 2016

With a new album, Spacedust & Oceanviews, due to arrive this spring, Anders Osborne (above, performing “Mind of a Junkie” for Jam in the Van) has embarked on a two-month North American tour, which brings him to the Capitol Theatre in Port Chester, N.Y., on Friday night—a pretty great way to kick off the weekend. And ahead of his arrival, the New Orleans guitar hero answered Five Questions for The House List.

You’ve obviously been living in New Orleans for quite some time now, but how did a kid from Southern Sweden originally get interested in the blues?
I was introduced to music by my mother and father—mostly classical and jazz. I discovered Robert Johnson, Snooks Eaglin, Earl King, Hound Dog Taylor and stuff like that in my teens growing up in New Orleans.

You’re currently in the midst of a big tour, but does performing in New York have any significance for you? And specifically playing the Capitol Theatre?
New York rocks! Some of my all time favorite shows have been in New York. I have a lot of friends from that area that I love seeing when I play there. It’s also one of the first places that gave me gigs as a touring artist back in the late ’80s and early ’90s. Places like Manny’s Car Wash, Tramps, Wetlands. Love it.

What’s different about this tour compared to others that have brought you up here?
This band kicks ass. We will also explore my entire catalog, playing previously not performed tunes. And we have great support artists on the whole tour! Amy Helm [opening on Friday at the Capitol Theatre], American Babies [also opening on Friday], Sister Sparrow & the Dirty Birds. They are all amazing.

What music or song always makes you dance?
“Sneakin’ Sally Through the Alley” with Robert Palmer backed by the Meters, produced by Allen Toussaint. Or anything by Allen Toussaint and Bob Marley.

At your after-party and there’s an endless jukebox, and we give you a buck. Which three songs are you playing?
“20 Million Things” by Lowell George, “These Days” by Jackson Browne and “So What” by Miles Davis. —R. Zizmor | @Hand_Dog