Tag Archives: Bowery Ballroom

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Power Trio Earthless Headline The Bowery Ballroom Tomorrow Night

December 12th, 2016

Influenced by krautrock, Japanese psychedelia and heavier rock bands like Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath, Isaiah Mitchell (guitar), Mike Eginton (bass) and Mario Rubalcaba (drums) formed the (primarily) instrumental power trio Earthless (above, performing “Uluru Rock” earlier this year) a decade-and-a-half ago in San Diego. Their most recent release, Acid Crusher/Mount Swan (stream it below), came out earlier this year. “Forget traditional structure, the verse-chorus-riff stuff that your parents instilled in you. Forget the jams the Grateful Dead laid out or the way the Allmans did witchy stuff over at the Fillmore. Forget the way that Can could take you deep inside the music. Forget all that and then brace yourself when it kicks in overtime via your genetic memory. It’s like déjà vu all over again,” raves PopMatters. “Earthless is stoned. Immaculate.” And they are currently working their way up the East Coast to play The Bowery Ballroom tomorrow night. Psychedelic five-piece Ruby the Hatchet open the show.

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Jesse Malin – The Bowery Ballroom – December 10, 2016

December 12th, 2016

Jesse Malin - The Bowery Ballroom - December 10, 2016

Photos courtesy of Marc Millman Photography | www.marcmillmanphotos.com/music

Contest

Grow a Pair: Win Free Tickets to See Emancipator on 12/9

December 6th, 2016

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Portland, Ore., down-tempo electronic producer and multi-instrumentalist Emanicpator performs live with a full band, driving everyone to dance floors across the world in the process. They come to New York City to kick off the weekend on Friday at The Bowery Ballroom, and although the show sold out quickly, The House List is giving away two tickets. Don’t have any of your own and still want to go? Try to Grow a Pair. Just fill out the form below, making sure to include your full name, e-mail address, which show you’re trying to win tickets to (Emancipator, 12/9) and a brief message explaining what you like most about electronic music. Eddie Bruiser, as open-minded as they come, will notify the winner by Friday. Good luck.

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Ultimate Painting Headline The Bowery Ballroom Tomorrow Night

December 6th, 2016

Ultimate Painting’s show at The Bowery Ballroom on Wednesday is part of the fast-rising band’s sixth tour of the United States—they’re hooked and so are we, and why not? Dusk (stream it below), the English duo’s third full-length album, released earlier this fall, firms up Ultimate Painting’s credentials as artisans of tunefully fractured pop and indie rock. (Or is that fractiously tuneful?) It’s subversive but not overcomplicated, chewable if not too smooth, subdued but not quiet. The Velvet Underground come up often as a descriptive association, as do a multitude of other bands, from the Byrds to Television. All of which is to say that Jack Cooper (formerly of Mazes) and James Hoare (formerly of Veronica Falls) are established craftsmen of not-overdone but hard-to-pin-down pop statements, some of which come grinded out (the Dusk closer, “I Can’t Run Anymore,” being a prime example), and some of which hide pointed edges in soft acoustics (“I’m Set Free”). You’d call them dreamy only if you’re feeling lazy. They’re dreamy the way the Velvets were contemplative. “I think we were hoping to make something more cohesive,” Cooper recently told Track Record about Dusk. “Something that worked more as an album rather than a collection of songs.… It’s difficult to describe the sounds and frequencies that we both respond to but stylistically, we’re pushing for more space.” Get to this Bowery show. They’re billing it as their biggest-ever U.S. appearance, but you can feel free to look at it as the last time you’ll see them in a room this small. And as an added bonus, Juan Wauters and EZTV open the show. —Chad Berndtson | @Cberndtson

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Low Cut Connie Cut Loose at The Bowery Ballroom on Friday

December 5th, 2016

Low Cut Connie – The Bowery Ballroom – December 2, 2016

Low Cut Connie – The Bowery Ballroom – December 2, 2016
Low Cut Connie’s Adam Weiner cut his teeth performing solo with his piano to some of New York City’s toughest crowds, gay bars, dive bars, restaurants, any number of other venues with an audience there mostly for something other than the music. But the end result today is that he’s one hell of a live performer—although Low Cut Connie’s classic rock and rolling chutzpah definitely helps too. “Are you guys here, are you guys ready to get weird, are you guys ready to make a baby tonight?” Weiner asked the lively crowd at The Bowery Ballroom on Friday night.

Piano-fueled rock is rare these days, and Low Cut Connie’s particular strain harkens back to the days of Little Richard, with Weiner’s piano in the opener, “Back in School,” chugging along in the background like a runaway train. That piano, affectionately called Shondra (named “for a beyond-middle-aged dancer from Atlanta’s Clermont Lounge”), sure knows how to take a beating, with him standing on its bench, standing on the piano itself, slinking beneath it and banging keys with his hands, feet, the microphone stand, whatever the situation calls for. If there was a moment when his hands were free, Weiner was pointing out into the audience or shaking his behind. The second tune brought along the barn-burning drinking sing-along “Boozophilia,” a favorite song of President Obama’s.

The band also paid tribute to one of Weiner’s home-state favorites, New Jersey’s recently reunited Misfits, with a piano-y cover of “Where Eagles Dare.” Weiner pointed out several in the crowd he thought were from Jersey, asking, “What exit?” “Shake It Little Tina,” an homage to Tina Turner, began with a teasing, lulling beat before building up to dancing chaos, with Weiner venturing out far into the audience by the song’s end. The band teased a new album, promised to be out early next year, with three new tracks, “Dirty Water,” about rock and roll, and one sung and written by guitarist James Everhart. The show ended with a fast-moving five-song encore, closing out with a rambunctious cover of Prince’s “Controversy.” —Dan Rickershauser | @D4nRicks

Photos courtesy of Silvia Saponaro | www.saponarophotography.com

Contest

Grow a Pair: Win Free Tickets to See Bastille on 12/5

November 29th, 2016

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Touring behind their second album, Wild World, Bastille return to New York City next week to play The Bowery Ballroom on Monday night. The show is sold out but The House List is giving away two tickets. Don’t have any of your own and still want to go? Try to Grow a Pair. It’s easy. Just fill out the form below, making sure to include your full name, e-mail address, which show you’re trying to win tickets to (Bastille, 12/5) and a brief message explaining why you’re so happy for December’s arrival. Eddie Bruiser, who’s in no rush to get to January and (even worse) February, will notify the winner by Friday. (And even if you don’t win, you can still see Bastille play Barclays Center on 3/30.)

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The Bad Plus Sound Right at Home at Rough Trade NYC

November 22nd, 2016

The Bad Plus – Rough Trade NYC – November 21, 2016

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Over the course of their 15-plus-year career, the Bad Plus have played in nearly every conceivable New York City venue: the Village Vanguard and the Jazz Standard, sure, but also The Bowery Ballroom and Prospect Park Bandshell among many others. So, although you don’t often see a grand piano, let alone many jazz trios, at Rough Trade NYC, it’s not surprising that the Bad Plus eventually were slotted to play there. Coming off their recent album, It’s Hard, consisting entirely of cover songs, many of them from the contemporary rock and pop canon, seemed like a good time to start. Their two-set show on Monday night stood on four tentpoles from the new LP—four covers that showed the range and creativity that would shine through in any setting.

The Bad Plus take a cover song like a blank sheet of paper and start making cuts into it to create an elaborate, unique snowflake. For one group to adequately cover music as varied as Cyndi Lauper’s “Time After Time,” Barry Manliow’s “Mandy,” Kraftwerk’s “The Robots” and Yeah Yeah Yeahs’ “Maps” would be very impressive. For a piano trio playing a rock club to do it, all the more amazing, each song recognizable only in its base parts, the group otherwise tearing at each composition’s fabric, finding patterns and beauty where it didn’t seem to exist in the original, often to stunning effect. But if the covers were paper snowflakes, the original Bad Plus material was some sort of four-dimensional origami, intricately folded artworks, dynamic and shape-shifting. The opening “Prehensile Dream” was a subtle slow build, pianist Ethan Iverson repeating a beautiful riff until quiet became loud and pretty became intense, bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Dave King providing an awe-inspiring crescendo.

The highlight of the first set came with the closing “Seven Minute Mind,” complicated rhythms hidden beneath an undeniably funky bass riff that may have required basic calculus to follow completely. “Keep the Bugs Off Your Glass and the Bears Off Your Ass” was rollicking blues that revealed multiple parenthetical diversions, eventually giving way to a great tangential bass-and-drum solo. Each song had its own unique feel and sound, all tied together with the band’s wit, talent and strong emotional core. The respectful but enthusiastic crowd was treated to one more cover for the encore, Johnny Cash’s “I Walk the Line,” which, under the eager scissors of the Bad Plus, became a thrilling exercise in rhythmic experimentation. For one night at least, for the Bad Plus and the roomful of fans, Rough Trade NYC felt just like home. —A. Stein | @Neddyo

 

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King Khan & BBQ Show Bring Good Times to The Bowery Ballroom

November 22nd, 2016

Montreal garage-rock duo King Khan & BBQ Show—manic frontman Arish “King” Khan and guitarist Mark “BBQ” Sultan—have been expertly mixing punk, soul, rock and doo wop into their own unique sound for more than a decade. Their fourth studio album, Bad News Boys (stream it below), came out last year. “At its core, Bad News Boys is a joyous celebration of all things rock and roll by two guys who seem to have it running in their blood,” according to Drowned in Sound. Not to be outdone, Glide Magazine added, “Bad News Boys is hilarious, beautiful and totally badass from start to finish…. King Khan is a force of nature no matter what he does, but there’s something truly uninhibited and unself-conscious about when he works with BBQ.” Fortunately, they’re working together on tour right now and you can see King Khan & BBQ Show (above, doing “Alone Again” live in studio for KEXP FM) tonight at The Bowery Ballroom. And as an added bonus, the Gartrells and Stompin’ Riff Raffs open the show.

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Ours Mix New and Old at The Bowery Ballroom on Saturday

November 21st, 2016

Ours – The Bowery Ballroom – November 19, 2016

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Known for its classy, sultry aesthetic, The Bowery Ballroom was perfectly suited for the amazing talents of Zane Carney and the incredible Ours on Saturday night. Ours, the headliner, are fronted by New Jersey native Jimmy Gnecco, a force to be reckoned with best known for his multioctave vocal range and taking personal experience and raw emotion to create meaningful songs. He introduced Hannah Gernand to accompany him on a new song from their forthcoming album due next spring. And earlier, she beautifully sang Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory’s “Pure Imagination” with a modern rock twist.

Ours performed an array of new songs mixed with older stuff like “Bleed.” Their magnetic stage presence transcended beyond words with loud-as-hell drums and guitar riffs. Each member—Static (guitar), April Bauer (piano), Chris Goodlof (bass), Race (guitar and keys) and Shane Rozum (drums)—brought something special. And despite some interpreting their lyrics as despondent, the band’s songs speak of everyday situations everyone can identify with. Ours are the charismatic alternative rockers you can see hundreds of times live and each show is something different. With a vast catalog of impressive songs, they passionately prove that anything can be accomplished. —Karen Silva | @ClassicKaren

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CRX – The Bowery Ballroom – November 18, 2016

November 21st, 2016

CRX - The Bowery Ballroom - November 18, 2016

Photos courtesy of Adela Loconte | adelaloconte.com

Five Questions with Nick Valensi of CRX

November 16th, 2016

For nearly 20 years Nick Valensi has been known as the Strokes’ lead guitarist (in addition to contributing backing vocals and some keys work). But he’s stepped out to do his own thing, fronting CRX, a new band—with an even newer debut album, the aptly named New Skin (stream it below)—playing The Bowery Ballroom on Friday night. And from a hotel room in Toronto, he exchanged e-mails with The House List to answer Five Questions.

It’s your first time taking on singing and songwriting, with CRX and New Skin. Have you been writing all along or is this a more recent thing? I’ve always written music and melodies, but this is my first time out as a lyricist and singer. I worked on it secretly for about a year before telling anyone I was thinking about starting a new band and being the singer. At first, I was way out of my comfort zone, so I had to put some time in and get enough experience to know if it was even something I wanted to pursue. Doing all the guitar stuff that I usually do and then having to sing on top of it continues to be a fun challenge. I feel like I’m using new parts of my brain.

Before becoming one of the defining bands of NYC’s rock scene around the turn of the century, the Strokes were just another group struggling to make it. How is playing smaller venues again? And what’s it like performing with different bandmates? I’m having so much fun playing clubs. I wanna be able to play all kinds of shows. I love doing the huge festivals with the Strokes, and I’m grateful to even have the opportunity to play at that level, but I don’t want that to be the only type of show I play. That’s really why I started CRX, to get a little balance from that. We’re touring clubs all over North America right now, and that’s exactly what I was craving when I had the idea to start the band.

How did the CRX lineup come together? And how did Josh Homme get involved with producing New Skin? I spent about a year writing, demo-ing and working on my singing. I didn’t really tell anyone about it. As someone who’s always been in a band, working alone was kind of a difficult process for me. Eventually, I hit a wall, got stuck and lost perspective on what direction to go. So I reached out to some musician friends who I respect for feedback and insight. I got together with Ralph and we’d jam on the songs so I could get an idea of what they’d sound like in a live setting. Richie and Darian came in and helped me out a lot with lyrics, and we cowrote a bunch on the album. Jon and I wrote a song called “On Edge” together, and he helped me a lot with arrangements.


It ended up being really collaborative. Josh was another one of the friends who I reached out to for help when I was feeling kinda stuck. We’ve known each other a long time, but really became friends when I moved to L.A. He fell in love with the demos and had some great ideas about how the songs should be recorded. Over the course of a conversation, I mentioned how I wished I could get him to produce, and he said he’d love to. So we just took it from there. CRX was a thing that came together so naturally, like the way that Josh came to produce the album. At the onset, I had no preconceptions about what this was gonna be, and I’ve just kinda gone with the flow through the whole process. As a result of that, all these cool things have come about in a natural, unforced way. I’m grateful that I’ve never had to put a band together using casting calls or Craigslist ads.

As a longtime New Yorker, what does it mean to you to be playing The Bowery Ballroom? I’m really excited to be back! It’s always been one of my favorite places to play and see a show. I worked part time at The Bowery Ballroom as a teenager, loading bands’ gear and selling T-shirts. Then, I went on to play there many times with the Strokes, so it’ll be very familiar to me when we pull in with CRX.

And what’s your favorite part of a tour stop in New York City? As a native New Yorker living in L.A., my favorite thing about getting back  is seeing family. My mom, sisters, nieces, nephews, cousins, aunts and uncles all live in the city and will all be at the Bowery ballroom show. It’s a wonder we still have tickets left to sell. —R. Zizmor | @Hand_Dog

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Margo Price Delights The Bowery Ballroom with New Music

November 16th, 2016

Margo Price – The Bowery Ballroom – November 15, 2016

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“The first time I played New York, there were about seven people there,” announced country singer Margo Price from the stage at The Bowery Ballroom last night. Surveying the sold-out crowd that had turned out to see her perform, she smiled and said, “This feels good.” Since the release of Price’s debut album, Midwest Farmer’s Daughter, earlier this year, it’s safe to say there is no going back to the days of sparsely attended shows. Price’s sound, a blend of traditional country music with lyrics that feel decidedly modern, is capped off by her smooth, soaring voice, capturing the raw emotion of her subject matter. Like any legit country artist, the topics of depression and drinking make an appearance throughout Price’s material, most notably on songs like the aptly titled, “Desperate and Depressed,” “World’s Greatest Loser” and “Since You Put Me Down.”

Price and her band fleshed out songs from the album with covers of artists like Merle Haggard, Kris Kristofferson and Karen Dalton, and, as the show fell on the week-anniversary of the presidential election, she made several references and allusions to our current state of politics (for the record, she is, to quote her own song, “desperate and depressed.”) As Price revisited numbers written about some of her darker moments, she maintained an upbeat attitude, offering, “I’m gonna sing a song about the time I went to jail accidentally,” as an introduction to “Weekender.” “Wasn’t the first time, but hopefully will be the last,” she added winking. Closing the show with “Hurtin’ (On the Bottle),” another crowd-pleasing drinking anthem, Price cheerfully jumped down into the audience, singing and dancing along with the revelers, a pure expression of the resilience she clearly seems to find in her music. —Alena Kastin | @AlenaK

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Thee Oh Sees in a Sweat-Lodge Hallucination of Garage-Rock Glory

November 14th, 2016

Thee Oh Sees – The Bowery Ballroom – November 11, 2016

Thee Oh Sees – The Bowery Ballroom – November 11, 2016
Catharsis? Many people were looking for an emotional release at the end of last week, and the sacred haven of a rock club was as good a place as any to find it. As if by fate, Thee Oh Sees were in town for three sold-out performances, and their show on Friday night at The Bowery Ballroom was the kind of shared experience that can renew your faith a little bit, even if it’s only for one night. John Dwyer took the stage with his band and offered, “Good luck the next four years,” before kicking off a set filled with flashes of anger and euphoria. Thee Oh Sees, the band with an extra e in their name, also bring a little bit extra to their live show, with one extra drummer, Dwyer backed by seemingly one too many amplifiers and the band as a whole delivering an extra bit of oomph into every morsel of their set, but, as always, it ended up being the perfect amount.

The performance covered Dwyer’s extensive and constantly growing and evolving repertoire, although it felt less about which songs were played and more about that they just kept coming without rest. With those two drum kits front and center—both literally onstage and musically—offering a constant pummeling of ready-to-explode rhythmic energy, there was little for the audience to do but relent to the music. Barely one song in, the show felt like a communal experience, some friends, mostly strangers. No matter how you tried, if you were on the floor, you were making contact with other like-minded human beings. By the time Thee Oh Sees busted into the crowd-pleasing rage of “Toe Cutter/Thumb Buster” early on, there was real physical contact: Whether you were slamming your body into others in front of the stage or just bumping into the guy next to you as you each contorted and flailed, song after song, room-piercing guitar riff after guitar riff.

That contact, the flesh and blood of the humans around you, heightened the energy in the room. Watching Thee Oh Sees channel all of that felt somehow biological: the sweat of the musicians, the pure kinetics of the nonstop drummers, the limits to just how hard you can flail your head back and forth in ecstatic dancing before you get dizzy, the tingling hairs on the back of your neck when Dwyer finally slowed it down for the psych-prog of “Sticky Hulks.” The set ended with an older piece, possibly “Warm Slime,” what he promised to be a “long song” ended up being a 25-minute sweat-lodge hallucination of garage-rock glory. Dwyer seemed oblivious to the outside world and took the rest of us with him. Bouncing from one cathartic melody to the next, it just kept going as if to make sure that everyone there had enough to get to that deep-inside place before walking out the doors to face the world again. —A. Stein | @Neddyo

Photos courtesy of Silvia Saponaro | www.saponarophotography.com

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Portugal. The Man Are Well Worth the Wait at The Bowery Ballroom

November 8th, 2016

Portugal. The Man – The Bowery Ballroom – November 7, 2016

Portugal. The Man – The Bowery Ballroom – November 7, 2016
It’s been a while since New York City has gotten a proper headlining show from Portugal. The Man. While there have been some coheadlining bills to keep their fans (slightly) satisfied over the past couple of years, the packed house at The Bowery Ballroom last night was justifiably antsy awaiting the Portland, Ore., band. That wait was filled with a psychedelic variety show of openers from stand-up comedy to German rappers. PTM have filled their tour with an upside-down assortment of friends, giving the entire affair a family feel that extended to the sold-out audience. Indeed, to be a fan of the group has a part-of-the-club feel and the room felt filled with diehards hoping their heroes would deliver.

Not to worry: Portugal. The Man’s set was well worth the wait. They opened with the title track to their 2007 album, Church Mouth, which hasn’t been in their repertoire for many years but still sizzled with up-to-date energy. The even older “Chicago”—its frenetic blasts of punk-prog, frontman John Gourley singing, “Burn this motherfucker down”—followed, and it was clear that this was a PTM that NYC hadn’t seen for quite some time. The rest of the set list was an expertly designed back and forth through the Portugal. The Man songbook, old and new, alternating from beautiful to cathartic to pure evil accompanied by unique bulbous lights, spheres of colors giving the effect of a sci-fi rock show. The crowd reveled in the invigorated set, the band artfully stringing together multiple songs, finding new places to insert extra guitar excursions and strobe-light climaxes.

“All Your Light” has long been a set centerpiece, but last night it seemed to realize its full potential as a triumphant suite with multiple bass-drum-guitar-keys rock-outs, eventually peaking with the outro to the Beatles’ “I Want You (She’s So Heavy)” feeling very much like it could have been a PTM original. Along the way, they still managed to hit all the beloved sing-alongs and pretty much all of their most recent Evil Friends album, although with plenty of impressive reinvention throughout, stretching the set well past the 100-minute mark. They finally finished with an expert pairing of Pink Floyd’s “Another Brick in the Wall” with their own “Purple Yellow Red and Blue,” everyone in the crowd triumphantly singing, dancing and waving their hands in the air, hoping it won’t be too long before the next one. —A. Stein | @Neddyo

Photos courtesy of Pip Cowley | pipcowleyshoots.com

Contest

Grow a Pair: Win Free Tickets to See Thee Oh Sees on 11/12

November 8th, 2016

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With a new album due to arrive next week, San Francisco’s Thee Oh Sees come to New York City on Friday and Saturday at The Bowery Ballroom and on Sunday at Warsaw. All three appearances are sold out, but The House List is giving away two tickets to Saturday’s show. Don’t have any and want them to be yours? Try to Grow a Pair. It’s easy. Just fill out the form below, making sure to include your full name, e-mail address, which show you’re trying to win tickets to (Thee Oh Sees, 11/12) and a brief message explaining what you love most about the band. Eddie Bruiser, who’s got an alphabetical list about this very topic, will notify the winner by Friday. Good luck.

 

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