Tag Archives: Brooklyn Steel

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Catch Up with Old Crow Medicine Show on Monday at Brooklyn Steel

August 18th, 2017

As purveyors of old-timey music, for nearly 20 years, Old Crow Medicine Show—Ketch Secor (fiddle, harmonica, banjo, guitar, mandolin and vocals), Critter Fuqua (banjo, guitars, accordion and vocals), Kevin Hayes (guitjo and vocals), Morgan Jahnig (bass and vocals), Chance McCoy (fiddle, guitar, banjo, mandolin and vocals) and Cory Younts (mandolin, drums, keys, harmonica and vocals)—have been spinning “traditional folk and bluegrass yarns with a rock and roll attitude,” according to AllMusic. They’re known for their fiery, energetic live performances and have released five studio albums, including 2014’s Remedy (stream it below), which the Guardian noted for its “impressive Americana with raw energy and classy musicianship.” Earlier this year, Old Crow Medicine Show (above, covering “Just Like a Woman”) released a live recording of Bob Dylan’s Blonde on Blonde, appropriately titled 50 Years of Blonde on Blonde (stream it below). And now in mid-tour form, they play Brooklyn Steel on Monday night. Joshua Hedley opens the show.

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Maggie Rogers – Brooklyn Steel – August 16, 2017

August 17th, 2017


Photos courtesy of Pip Cowley | pipcowleyshoots.com

Grow a Pair: Win Free Tickets to See Maggie Rogers on 8/17

August 15th, 2017

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After a run of summer festivals, supremely talented singer-songwriter Maggie Rogers is home in Brooklyn this week to play Brooklyn Steel tomorrow and again on Thursday. Both appearances sold out quickly, but The House List is giving away two tickets to Thursday’s show. Don’t have any of your own and still want to go? No worries. Try to Grow a Pair. It’s easy. Just fill out the form below, making sure to include your full name, e-mail address, which show you’re trying to win tickets to (Maggie Rogers, 8/17) and a brief message explaining what your favorite thing is about August. Eddie Bruiser, who could use a little convincing, will notify the winner by Thursday. Good luck.

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Kick Off the Weekend with RJD2 at Brooklyn Steel on Friday Night

August 9th, 2017

Producer-DJ Ramble Jon Krohn has been combining disparate sounds into his own unique, soulful take on underground hip-hop as RJD2 for more than two decades. And in addition to his work with others, RJD2 (above, the video for “The Sheboygan Left”) also does his own thing as a singer-songwriter and engaging performer. Recorded in Philadelphia, his eclectic sixth studio album, Dame Fortune (stream it below), which includes guests like Son Little, came out last year. “Jumbling Krautrock, ’70s electronica and Philly soul at its brightest, Dame Fortune is producer RJD2’s grandest solo record since his 2002 debut,” raved AllMusic. “Dame Fortune is a culmination album with an artist’s evolution pushing things forward with all his strengths in tow.” Check out those strengths live when he returns to New York City on Friday night at Brooklyn Steel.

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London Grammar – Brooklyn Steel – August 1, 2017

August 2nd, 2017


Photos courtesy of DeShaun Craddock | dac.photography

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Grow a Pair: Win Free Tickets to See London Grammar Tonight

August 1st, 2017

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London Grammar’s second LP, Truth Is a Beautiful Thing, came out, to a fair amount of acclaim, two months back. And with tours across Australia and Europe later this year, the English trio makes an American appearance tonight at Brooklyn Steel. Predictably, the show sold out very quickly. But even if you got shut out, you can still try to Grow a Pair of free tickets from The House List. It’s easy. Just fill out the form below, making sure to include your full name, e-mail address, which show you’re trying to win tickets to (London Grammar, 8/1) and a brief message explaining why you deserve to go. Eddie Bruiser, who’s genuinely interested, will notify the winner this afternoon. Good luck.

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Ride – Brooklyn Steel – July 21, 2017

July 21st, 2017


Photos courtesy of Adela Loconte | adelaloconte.com

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Nas – Brooklyn Steel – July 19, 2017

July 20th, 2017


Photos courtesy of DeShaun Craddock | dac.photography

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Arca & Jesse Kanda Live – Brooklyn Steel – July 6, 2017

July 7th, 2017


Photos courtesy of Adela Loconte | adelaloconte.com

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Dawes – Brooklyn Steel – June 14, 2017

June 15th, 2017


(Dawes play the Capitol Theatre tomorrow night.)

Photos courtesy of Mike Benigno | mikebenigno.com

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James Vincent McMorrow Brings Brand-New Tunes to Brooklyn Steel

June 13th, 2017

There’s something about Ireland that breeds singer-songwriters, like Damien Rice, Villagers and Hozier. Enter James Vincent McMorrow. Having only picked up a guitar at the age of 19, the late boomer quickly tried to master other instruments in order to create richer layers of composition. Like a Celtic Bon Iver, he trapped himself in a house on an Irish coast to produce his 2010 debut, Early in the Morning (stream it below). McMorrow didn’t return with the follow-up, Post Tropical (stream it below), which shined more on his R&B and soul influences rather than folk music, for nearly four years. But he’s been downright prolific ever since. In fact McMorrow’s fourth full-length—and third in four years—True Care (stream it below), suddenly arrived just a few weeks ago. The Irish Times says, “McMorrow presents 15 new tunes that further consolidate his position as a songwriter of meaningful, depth-charged soul music.” While the Irish Examiner calls the album “a sublime, abstracted gift that keeps on giving.” And having just kicked off a North American tour in support of the new LP, McMorrow (above, performing “Get Low,” on Jimmy Kimmel Live!, and, below, covering “Purple Rain”) returns to NYC to play Brooklyn Steel on Thursday night. —Sharlene Chiu

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The Specials – Brooklyn Steel – June 9, 2017

June 12th, 2017


Photos courtesy of Adela Loconte | adelaloconte.com

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Kick Off Your Weekend with the Specials at Brooklyn Steel on Friday

June 8th, 2017

There’s so much that can be said about the legendary U.K. band the Specials that it’s almost unfair to simply credit them as forefathers of the second wave of ska. Formed in 1977, the band fused together Jamaican reggae and ska rhythms with a punk sneer, adding highly political lyrics tackling both racism and class issues. Their self-titled Elvis Costello–produced debut (stream it below) is a stone-cold classic of the era with hits like “Nite Klub,” “Gangsters” and a cover of Dandy Livingstone’s “A Message to You Rudy” that all transcend the 2 Tone genre and still sound visceral and full of life today. With many lineup changes over the years and a lengthy hiatus, the Specials got back together as a touring unit in 2008 and have been moving crowds ever since. Back in America, the Specials (above, performing “Ghost Town” for BBC Radio 6) bring their joyous sound to Brooklyn Steel this Friday for what is bound to be an epic party. Kings County five-piece the Far East open the show. —Patrick King | @MrPatKing

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Pixies – Brooklyn Steel – May 26, 2017

May 30th, 2017


(Pixies play the Westbury Theater on 9/22 and the Capitol Theatre on 9/24.)

Photos courtesy of DeShaun Craddock | dac.photography

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Five Questions with Frightened Rabbit’s Scott Hutchison

May 26th, 2017

For more than a decade, Frightened RabbitScott Hutchison (vocals and guitar), brother Grant Hutchison (drums), Billy Kennedy (guitar and bass), Andy Monaghan (guitar and keys) and Simon Liddell (guitar)—have been making global noise on the strength of soaring, melancholic arena rock with resonant lyrics that stay with you. Since then, the Scottish rockers (above, doing “I Wish That I Was Sober” live for KTBG FM) have become as equally well known for their fiery live performances as for their recorded output. The band’s fifth LP, Painting of a Panic Attack (stream it below), which came out last spring, was produced by the National’s Aaron Dessner. “Though Hutchison’s talent for crafting beautifully dark stories hasn’t changed much, Frightened Rabbit’s sound most definitely has, thanks in part to Dessner behind the mixing desk,” said the Line of Best Fit. “The usual aching melancholy that has the capability to flip to captivating exuberance at a moment’s notice is ever present but Dessner’s experience with the National gives a whole new, often gloomy, depth to their sound.” Frightened Rabbit play Brooklyn Steel next Tuesday. And ahead of the band’s North American tour, The House List contacted the frontman to answer Five Questions.

Painting of a Panic Attack features electronics more than your other albums. Was that a conscious choice ahead of time or is that just the way things went as you wrote? I think we all wanted to move in that direction a little more with this album, but it wasn’t forced. Through necessity, I was figuring out how to use music software for the first time and exploring the raft of sounds held in Logic. Andy has always been interested in electronic music, so for him it was a natural place to go.

So many Frightened Rabbit songs are anthemic, somehow sounding like upbeat tales even when they’re about downer topics—not many bands could get crowds to lustily belt out lyrics about loneliness or “It takes more than fucking someone you don’t know to keep warm.” Is that something you set out to do? I’ve always been looking for that contrast within the songs. From very early on I knew I wanted the melodic qualities of the music to act like an open door, warm and welcoming, sometimes anthemic. Then once you’re in the room, you hear all these dark lines and it might be a little jarring, but we’ve already shut the door behind you. Ha!

What’s your process for recording new material? Is everything written and fleshed out in advance of going into the studio? Or do you just have sketches and ideas of songs ready to go? We’re usually relatively well prepared but recently we’ve enjoyed developing songs from rough sketches in the studio. Being overprepared or too certain of the songs can result in losing those little moments of studio magic. That’s our excuse for not knowing what the fuck we’re doing.

Once a track is recorded and released, does it stay like that in perpetuity, or do songs grow as you play them live? They always grow, they absolutely should. Often it’s just through boredom within the band, but sometimes the audience drives it forward. I never thought “The Loneliness and the Scream” would be a set-closer, but that had nothing to do with us. It was the crowds latching on to a melody and sticking with it. That was a surprise.

Do you have any crutches when writing a song—are there certain words or styles you feel you lean on too much? Absolutely. It’s a big danger and I’ve caught myself repeating themes again and again. However, I do think it’s important to develop your own world within the songs, and repeated lyrical themes are a big part of that. And the thing is: I am still a bit of a drunken failure. I’m not making it up. —R. Zizmor | @Hand_Dog