Tag Archives: Brooklyn

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Slowdive – Brooklyn Steel – May 8, 2017

May 9th, 2017


Photos courtesy of Adela Loconte | adelaloconte.com

Contest

Grow a Pair: Win Free Tickets to See Father John Misty on 5/11

May 9th, 2017

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With another acclaimed LP under his belt, Father John Misty returns to New York City this week for three shows. Tickets still remain to see him tomorrow at Kings Theatre, but his Thursday and Friday appearances at Brooklyn Steel are already sold out. The House List is giving away two tickets to Thursday’s show. Want to go? Try to Grow a Pair. It’s easy. Just fill out the form below, making sure to include your full name, e-mail address, which show you’re trying to win tickets to (Father John Misty, 5/11) and a brief message explaining your favorite Pure Comedy tune. Eddie Bruiser, who’s been listening to the album on vinyl, will notify the winner by Thursday. Good luck.

(Father John Misty plays the Capitol Theatre on 9/14.)

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Catfish and the Bottlemen – Brooklyn Steel – May 6, 2017

May 8th, 2017


Photos courtesy of Adela Loconte | adelaloconte.com

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Nao – Brooklyn Steel – May 5, 2017

May 8th, 2017


Photos courtesy of Annie Kane | anniekane.work

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Pond Celebrate New Album with a Pair of NYC Shows Next Week

May 4th, 2017

When you think about psychedelic rock from Perth, Australia—assuming you do think about psychedelic rock from Perth, Australia—Tame Impala probably come to mind first. And so a pair of touring members of Kevin Parker’s acclaimed outfit, Nick Allbrook (vocals, guitar and keys) and Jay Watson (guitar, vocals and drums), teamed up with Joe Ryan (guitar, bass and vocals) and Jamie Terry (keys, synths and bass) to form the psych collective Pond nine years ago in order to play with anybody they wanted. The band began releasing a host of singles, EPs and LPs in 2009, and their sixth full-length studio album, Man It Feels Like Space Again (stream it below), came out two years ago to some considerable acclaim. “Classic rock touchstones are intrinsic to Pond, but they shove them into futuristic territory—gifted musicians unafraid to indulge their flights of fancy,” said Rolling Stone. “This balance of playfulness and serious is Pond’s carnival act, but it’s their mastery of it on Man It Feels Like Space Again that makes it so damn fun—and Pond so very exciting.” Their newest album, The Weather (produced by Parker), comes out tomorrow. “The Weather is chaotic, confrontational and compelling,” says the AU Review. “Episodes of chaos are met with equal parts clarity and discovery, as we navigate through Pond’s transportive world of psychedelic rock.” And Pond (above, performing “30,000 Megatons” live for the French televison series Le Grand Journal) celebrate its release on Tuesday at Music Hall of Williamsburg and then again on Wednesday at The Bowery Ballroom. Australian singer-songwriter Kirin J Callinan opens both shows.

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Sam Evian and Uni Ika Ai Keep It Local at Rough Trade NYC Saturday

May 3rd, 2017

Singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Sam Owens is known for fronting Brooklyn trio Celestial Shore, but he does the solo thing as Sam Evian (above, the video for “Sleep Easy”). And to that end, his debut long-player, Premium (stream it below), inspired by the likes of Shuggie Otis, Jackson Browne and Cass McCombs, came out last summer. AllMusic said it’s a “seductive listen that’s equally suited for early morning hangovers and late, late nights.” While No Depression added: “Premium is a spaced-out gem of trippy, layered instrumental arrangements and Evian’s smooth, creamy harmonies. And it is the perfect soundtrack for you last days of summer, with its beachy, bright coolness.”

Brooklyn dream-pop act Uni Ika AiMaia Friedman (vocals, synths and guitar), Peter Lalish (guitar and synths), Tom Deis (keys, bass and vocals) and Dan Drohan (drums and percussion)—also put out a first LP, Keeping a Golden Bullseye in the Corner of My Mind (stream it above), last year. In dubbing it a “stunning debut album,” the Wild Honey Pie went on to say, “The songs are dreamy without becoming cloudy—they exist within a comfortable haze and tempo, but don’t succumb to feeling lethargic or apathetic. The vocals and instrumentals push forward with ease, creating tracks that feel steady but triumphant, relaxed but purposeful.” Uni Ika Ai (below, doing “Mexico” for Sofar Sounds) have teamed up with Sam Evian for a few shows this week, and you can catch them both on Saturday night at Rough Trade NYC. A third Brooklyn act, Wilder Maker, opens.

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Nao Closes Out Her Tour on Friday Night at Brooklyn Steel

May 3rd, 2017

Neo Joshua grew up in East London studying vocal jazz. She’s since gone on to make what she calls “wonky funk”—a winning amalgamation of electronic music, R&B, soul and funk—as Nao, earning comparisons to FKA Twigs in the process. After doing time as a backup singer (for Jarvis Cocker no less) and putting out a couple of EPs, her first full-length, For All We Know (stream it below), came out last summer to near universal acclaim. “Nao’s debut album certainly isn’t shy about setting her out as one of the UK’s brightest new talents,” said NME. “The first thing you notice is her voice, a fluttery but punchy thing with a propulsive kind of power.” And Spin added: “Whether or not Nao is ‘Girlfriend’ material—to cite the demure-yet-hopeful ballad that closes this sensational debut—she’s evolving into an artist serious pop listeners can commit to.” You can also commit to seeing her in person because Nao (above, performing “Bad Blood” live in studio for KEXP FM) closes out her American tour on Friday night at Brooklyn Steel. And Brooklyn’s Brasstracks open the show.

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Jamestown Revival – Brooklyn Steel – April 30, 2017

May 1st, 2017


Photos courtesy of Annie Kane | anniekane.work

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The Black Angels Bring New Music to Brooklyn Steel on Tuesday

May 1st, 2017

Taking their name from the Velvet Underground tune “The Black Angel’s Death Song,” the psychedelic garage-rock band the Black Angels formed more than a decade ago in Austin, Texas. The group—Stephanie Bailey (drums), Christian Bland (guitar, drone machine and organ), Alex Maas (vocals, bass, drone machine and organ), Kyle Hunt (keys, percussion, bass and guitar) and Jake Garcia (guitar)—recently released their fifth long-player, Death Song (stream it below), to some considerable praise. Paste says it “is both unlike anything they’ve done before and also the most purely Black Angels album they have released. It’s as if the Texas psych-garage mainstays have now fully mapped the edges of their sound and that this process has allowed them to return with an extreme vengeance to the dead center of what they are.” And the Guardian calls the full-length “a menacing return to form,” while Glide adds: “The album gains momentum with each song and gets better with each subsequent listen.” Touring behind the new music, the Black Angels (above, performing “Half Believing” live on French TV) play Brooklyn Steel on Tuesday, and Brooklyn trio A Place to Bury Strangers open the show.

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A Double Dose of the Wild Reeds in New York City This Week

May 1st, 2017

Individually they’re known as Kinsey Lee, Mackenzie Howe and Sharon Silva, but collectively the three are known as the Wild Reeds (above, performing “Patience” for KRCC FM), the L.A. band deftly mixing straight-up rock, ethereal folk and twangy country, all beneath three distinct voices joined in harmony. Their second full-length, The World We Built (stream it below), came out last month. NPR Music compares the trio to Crosby, Stills & Nash, adding that the album “is underpinned by brash guitar textures, harmonium and a killer rhythm section. The Wild Reeds grasp the wonder of song.” In New York City this week, they play tomorrow at Rough Trade NYC and on Wednesday at Mercury Lounge. Nashville, Tenn., rock five-piece Blank Range open both shows.

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Mitski – Brooklyn Steel – April 29, 2017

May 1st, 2017


Photos courtesy of Dana (distortion) Yavin | distortionpix.com

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A Frenzied Thursday Night Goldfrapp Dance Party at Brooklyn Steel

April 28th, 2017

Goldfrapp – Brooklyn Steel – April 27, 2017


For well more than a decade together, Alison Goldfrapp and Will Gregory have crafted a lineage of dance music heavily drenched in synth pop. And their seventh album, Silver Eye, is no exception. “Silver Eye’s tracks have a sincere, blunt-force feeling that’s new and closer to the actual core of their musical identity. It’s like Kiss taking off the makeup, but, you know, good,” cleverly positioned Pitchfork. Goldfrapp followers are aware of a past that floated from disco beats to romantic pastoral hymns, but even more memorable are Goldfrapp’s performances donning a Marlene Dietrich look to dreamy frocks paired with long curly locks. For the group’s second performance at the barely month-old Brooklyn Steel, she graced the stage with an appropriately metallic ensemble.

A pair of tracks from her debut album, Felt Mountain“Utopia” and “Lovely Head”—had longtime fans in early elation before a survey of the latest album. Her newer pieces were nicely adorned with visuals ranging from the celestial for “Anymore” to ocular rings on “Ocean.” There was a fair amount of warning about strobe lights before going through the doors, and that was for good reason as the singer was backlit the entire evening with pulsating lights to animate her frenetic dancing. Goldfrapp paused the set to exclaim, “I’ve been here a week and love it. I wanna move here.” Yes please! A continuation of newer material rounded out the second half of the set with the robotic “Everything Is Never Enough” and tribal distorted voices on “Become the One.” The warehouse erupted for the recent single “Systemagic” as the sea of bodies pumped to heavy bass and were quickly lulled to a dreamy sway for oldie “Number 1.”

Despite a botched wardrobe change due to her current outfit being “stuck on,” the best was saved for last as Goldfrapp returned to encore with a quartet of fan favorites starting with the intoxicating “Black Cherry.” A keytar emerged on “Shiny and Warm,” and iPhone lovers held up their phones high for “Ooh La La,” which was featured in one of the product’s commercials. “Strict Machine,” with its thumping reverb, capped off the night sending a frenzied audience out onto the streets of East Williamsburg. —Sharlene Chiu

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Jamestown Revival Come to Brooklyn Steel on Sunday Night

April 28th, 2017

Zach Chance (vocals and piano) and Jonathan Clay (vocals and guitar) met as teens in Texas and bonded over a wide array of music. Eventually, each launched a solo singer-songwriter career, sometimes harmonizing together while on tour. Thanks to the enthusiastic crowd response to their combined vocals, Chance and Clay formed Jamestown Revival six years ago, making Southern-tinged Americana featuring their harmonies. Their first album, Utah (stream it below), burst onto the scene in 2014, offering “up a big, bright, and mellifluous set of meticulously honed, radio-ready, country-folk confections that blend tight Everly/Avett Brothers harmonies with breezy West Coast melodies that invoke names like the Lumineers, Blitzen Trapper, Band of Horses and Belle Brigade,” according to AllMusic. Jamestown Revival (above, performing “Love Is a Burden” live in studio for KUTX FM) returned last year with their sophomore effort, The Education of a Wandering Man (stream it below), which PopMatters called “an upbeat road album filled with rich harmonies.” Going on to add: “While Jamestown Revival’s harmonies are the constant that provides cohesion, it’s their melding of influences that makes The Education of a Wandering Man stand out in a sea of post-Black Crowes country-rock outfits.” See Jamestown Revival play live on Sunday at Brooklyn Steel. Maine holler-folk four-piece Ghost of Paul Revere open the show.

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Of Montreal Make Weird Normal at Music Hall of Williamsburg

April 28th, 2017

Of Montreal – Music Hall of Williamsburg – April 27, 2017

You’re weird! When you were a kid, that would’ve been a put-down, but nowadays, in some circles, the greater sin is being normal. No worries for Kevin Barnes, the lead genius behind Of Montreal, who showered a sold-out Music Hall of Williamsburg with their Day-Glo, bizarro resplendence last night. With a later start time, the set was the kind of happening that transpires when the normal folk are sleeping, a giant dreamlike hairy beast, a yeti in Brooklyn, marching across the stage as the band wound up “Gratuitous Abysses,” before Barnes had even taken the stage. The cosmic doo-wop sounded like eight genres mashed together, or maybe more like flipping among them so fast that it felt that way, a good primer for the sight-and-sound feast of a show that followed.

At times watching Of Montreal go through their set, many songs accompanied by a traveling troupe of performers acting out a hallucinogenic scene, each difficult to describe in words, was like watching a Saturday morning cartoon, the band maybe splitting time between their deeply psychedelic grooving and, at any moment, hopping off in a multihued van to go fight crime somewhere. The opening stretch was heavy on the synth and disco whorls, but a few songs in, Barnes picked up his guitar and the sound worked more toward a funked-up glam. The audience continuing to push closer to the stage to get into his orbit, whooping at each wardrobe change, Barnes working a new look at each third of the night.

The set list folded selections from Of Montreal’s vast and varying catalog, “Different for Girls” fueling a front-to-back dance party, “Bunny Ain’t No Kind of Rider” getting everyone to sing along in collective glee, “Gronlandic Edit”—with Barnes singing about “all the party people dancing”—was explosive fun of room-rattling bass. The last third of the performance was a nonstop blast of crowd-pleasers, with enough “Is that what I think it is, WTF?” moments mixed in to get most people in the room shaking their heads almost as much as they were shaking their bodies. The set closed, appropriately, with “The Party’s Crashing on Us,” off 2005’s The Sunlandic Twins album, which goes to show how long Barnes has been infectiously bounding around a stage with Chinese dragons and the like, in a hot-pink number, or with little clothing on at all, for that matter, as normal as can be. —A. Stein | @Neddyo

Photos courtesy of Silvia Saponaro | www.saponarophotography.com

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Violents and Monica Martin Bring Their Dream Pop to Brooklyn

April 27th, 2017

Violents and Monica Martin – Rough Trade NYC – April 26, 2017


Collaboration (noun): the action of working with someone to produce or create something. Jeremy Larson is a master collaborator and the man behind the indie collective Violents. The multi-instrumentalist not only plays all the music he has composed, but he also writes all of the lyrics. The hitch is that he partners with a female vocalist to bring each of these pieces to fruition. Previous collaborators have included Stacy King (Eisley, Sucre), Olga Yagolnikov (Kye Kye) and Nashville, Tenn., singer Annie Williams. For the first full-length record, Awake and Pretty Much Sober, Larson enlisted Phox frontwoman Monica Martin to flesh out his compositions with her sultry vocals.

Two days before the release of the album, Violents and Monica Martin played their first performance during an afternoon session at the Paste Studios before gracing the stage of Rough Trade NYC last night for their debut concert. Accompanied by the string quartet Rootstock Republic and a drummer (Joe), the duo opened with the glittering “Equal Power,” the first of four tracks released prior to the album. The performance would debut six additional songs, from the come-hither lullaby “Line Lie” to the trip-hop groove of “It Won’t Stop.” Throughout the set, clips of cinematic scenes played, including the iconic dance sequence from House Party providing the backdrop for “Hue.”

Midway through the show, Larson told the story of how the partnership formed after being a long admirer of Martin’s. He confessed he was a little cocky writing songs especially meant for her to sing before ever meeting the vocalist. Luckily a mutual friend got them connected and the rest is history. Martin added that a “shared insecurity” manifested with her singing lyrics she hadn’t written and Larson relinquishing vocal duties. As if new songs weren’t enough to satisfy the crowd, Martin proceeded to cover Frank Ocean’s “Self Control.” The evening was a reverie of dream pop that concluded with the title track and the apt closer “How It Left.” —Sharlene Chiu