Tag Archives: Dawes

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Dawes – Brooklyn Steel – June 14, 2017

June 15th, 2017


(Dawes play the Capitol Theatre tomorrow night.)

Photos courtesy of Mike Benigno | mikebenigno.com

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Sam Outlaw Brings a Taste of California Country to Mercury Lounge

April 19th, 2017

Former ad-sales executive Sam Morgan has been doing business as the California-country singer-songwriter Sam Outlaw (above, performing “Love Her for a While” for WFUV FM) since his debut studio album, Angeleno (stream it below), arrived in 2015, featuring cameos from My Morning Jacket keyboardist Bo Koster and Dawes frontman Taylor Goldsmith, among others. “As an album, Angeleno holds up time and time again,” said American Songwriter. “For anyone who feels similarly disenchanted about country music, Outlaw’s songs—closely bound to tradition, endlessly romantic—are the perfect remedy.” His second full-length, Tenderheart (stream it below), came out last Friday. Vulture makes comparisons to Gram Parsons, Ryan Adams and James Taylor, adding: “Tenderheart is the sound of Angeleno’s budding artist finding his voice and crafting a work as great as his killer country nom de plume. Two years after shaking his life up to chase a dream of country stardom, Sam Outlaw is sitting on one of the genre’s best albums of the year. It’s never too late to heed your calling.” Check out Sam Outlaw live at the early show Thursday night at Mercury Lounge. Virginia singer-songwriter Dori Freeman opens.

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Delta Spirit and Friends Come to Warsaw Tomorrow Night

August 6th, 2015

Charismatic frontman Matt Vasquez (vocals and guitar), Jon Jameson (bass), Brandon Young (drums), Kelly Winrich (keys and vocals) and Will McLaren (guitar) formed the soulful Americana five-piece Delta Spirit (above, performing “From Now On” for KUTX FM) a decade ago in San Diego. They won over fans the old-fashioned way, crisscrossing the country—often with their musical brothers-in-arms Deer Tick and Dawes—and becoming known for arena-ready songs and energetic, leave-it-all-onstage live shows, not to mention their quality discography, which includes four well-received studio full-lengths. The most recent of which, Into the Wide (stream it below), came out last year. Per Consequence of Sound, “They’ve successfully expanded their range without it feeling unnatural. The change is never forced; they just have faith in their intuition. That’s what led them to Brooklyn, which led them to Into the Wide. Wherever those instincts take them next, they should trust it.” And not only do Delta Spirit play Warsaw tomorrow, but they’re also bring some friends with them: MGMT’s James Richardson, Guards’ Loren Humphrey, Cults’ Brian Oblivion, Madeline Follin and Gabe Rodriguez, and Jessica Lea Mayfield.

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Don’t Miss Blake Mills Tomorrow Night at Music Hall of Williamsburg

July 29th, 2015

A musician’s musician, California native Blake Mills is a talented dude, ably working as a singer, songwriter, guitarist, producer and composer. And even if you don’t know his name (yet), plenty of big names in music do. “Eric Clapton recently called him ‘the last guitarist I heard that I thought was phenomenal.’ The producer Don Was says he is ‘one of those rare musicians who come along once in a generation,’” according to the New York Times. Mills founded his first band, the Dawes precursor Simon Dawes, with high school friend Taylor Goldsmith. When the group broke up, Mills went on to play in Jenny Lewis’s band and to tour with Band of Horses, Fiona Apple and Lucinda Williams, while managing to find time to do session work with the likes of the Avett Brothers, Norah Jones, Kid Rock, Neil Diamond and Lana Del Rey. As a means to drum up more session work, Mills (above, performing “Don’t Tell Our Friends About Me” for Public Radio International) put out his debut solo album, Break Mirrors (stream it below), in 2010, which led to him scoring producing work with acts like Conor Oberst, Alabama Shakes and Sky Ferreira. His sophomore effort, Heigh Ho (stream it below), arrived last year to some impressive reviews: “It moves through musical eras and genres without ever sounding out of place, too clever, or at all clumsy. Mills is as centered as a songwriter as he is a player and producer. There is nothing extra here and that’s as it should be. Heigh Ho puts on offer much of what he’s learned these past four years, and displays it all with acumen and openness,” per AllMusic. Currently winding down an East Coast swing, Blake Mills plays Music Hall of Williamsburg tomorrow night. Local jazz guitarist Julian Lage opens the show.

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Dawes and First Aid Kit – SummerStage – July 27, 2015

July 28th, 2015

Dawes - SummerStage - July 27, 2015

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Dawes and First Aid Kit Play SummerStage on Monday Night

July 24th, 2015

Since forming in Southern California six years ago, the guys in Dawes—Taylor Goldsmith (vocals and guitar), Wylie Gelber (bass), Griffin Goldsmith (drums) and Tay Strathairn (keys)—have won over fans across the land with their high-energy live shows and four albums—including this year’s All Your Favorite Bands (stream it below), which Rolling Stone called “their best LP” and American Songwriter labeled “an inspired record full of space, swagger and warm, analog glow”—filled with tightly written songs, quality harmonies and some good old-fashioned guitar love. But one of the most interesting things about Dawes (above, doing “Things Happen” on Late Show with David Letterman) is the vast array of bands and musicians with whom they’ve been associated. They’ve been compared to the Band, for their lyrics, and Crosby, Stills & Nash, for their harmonies. They’ve crisscrossed the country and teamed up with their musical brothers-in-arms, Deer Tick and Delta Spirit. And in the band’s infancy, they took part in jam sessions at Jonathan Wilson’s house with the likes of Chris Robinson, Benmont Tench and Conor Oberst. But after finding success, Dawes went on to back some of the biggest names in rock royalty, Robbie Robertson, Jackson Browne and John Fogerty.

Sisters Johanna Söderberg (vocals and synth) and Klara Söderberg (vocals and guitar) launched their harmonies-laden acoustic-folk band, First Aid Kit, eight years ago in Sweden, earning comparisons to Fleet Foxes and Joanna Newsom in the process. Now rounded out by Melvin Duffy (pedal-steel guitar) and Scott Simpson (drums), First Aid Kit (below, performing “Stay Gold” on Conan) put out their third studio album, Stay Gold (stream it below), which the New Yorker calls their “most mature and opulent work to date,” in 2014. They also provided backing vocals on Conor Oberst’s sixth solo album, Upside Down Mountain, last year, while Dawes backed Oberst when he performed the new material live. And now Dawes and First Aid Kit team up as a terrific double bill to play SummerStage in Central Park on Monday night.

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Deer Tick Don’t Need a Reason to Throw a Party

December 29th, 2014

Deer Tick – Brooklyn Bowl – December 28, 2014

Deer Tick – Brooklyn Bowl – December 28, 2014
If Deer Tick have proved anything over the past 10 years, it’s that they don’t need an excuse to celebrate: Their shows are always equal parts rock concert and private party. So when there really is a reason to throw a bash, like, say, their 10-year anniversary this month, well, they really go all out. Sunday night found them halfway into a six-night New Year’s run at Brooklyn Bowl, each date featuring special guests and album covers and plenty of surprises. Last night’s first set was Deer Tick’s take on Meet the Beatles, an interesting selection to say the least. Wearing matching custom bowling shirts commemorating the anniversary, they got things moving with spot-on renditions of the opening one-two of “I Want to Hold Your Hand” and “I Saw Her Standing There.” McCauley’s Providence, R.I., growl provided a Deer Tick warmth to the well-known songs. He joked that he would sing the Lennon parts, Ian O’Neil would sing the McCartney parts, but they had no George Harrison, so they invited the night’s first guest, Taylor Goldsmith of Dawes, to sing “Don’t Bother Me.” His manic presence on vocals loosened the band a little. Later the Felice Brothers’ James Felice played accordion to the same effect, punctuating a set that was equally fun for the band and packed house alike.

Following a short break, just McCauley and Goldsmith returned to play as “Little Brother,” performing material from the Middle Brother collaboration they were involved in a few years ago. The audience went quiet at once, savoring the special treat while the duet spun a stellar four-song mini-set that included “Daydreaming,” “Thanks for Nothing” and “Million Dollar Bill,” the stage dappled in colored lights adding to the special feeling in the room. By the time Deer Tick proper took the stage to play their own material, it felt like we’d already been treated to a celebration worthy of 10 years, but of course the guys had plenty more in the tank, pulling out rarities like “Hand in My Hand” and crowd-favorite sing-alongs like “Main Street,” which anchored the strongest stretch of the evening.

Just when things felt like they were winding down, Deer Tick brought out the Replacements’ Tommy Stinson to lead a couple of songs, including a barn-burning version of the Who’s “The Kids Are Alright” that had Dennis Ryan impressively going all Keith Moon behind the kit. It didn’t seem possible to top that, but Deer Tick had no problem trying, bringing about a dozen guests onstage, including Stinson, Goldsmith, Felice as well as Robert Ellis and opener Joe Fletcher, all in their own bowling shirts, I might add. They led the crowd in a rousing version of “Goodnight, Irene” that was appropriately epic to end a weeklong celebration. But it really only marked the midway point of the week and, who knows, maybe their career. But one thing’s for sure, Deer Tick are just getting started.
—A. Stein | @Neddyo

Photos courtesy of Joe Papeo | www.irocktheshot.com

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The Sky Is the Limit for Larkin Poe

October 30th, 2014

Larkin Poe – Mercury Lounge – October 29, 2014

Larkin Poe – Mercury Lounge – October 29, 2014
When I saw Conor Oberst play Central Park’s SummerStage back in July, I loved his massive hodgepodge of a backing band, the majority of which was made up of opener Dawes, and there was a horn section. But most notably there were two women tearing it up on slide guitars and singing the Emmylou Harris parts during the Bright Eyes songs that night—and I knew I had to find out who they were.

It turns out they are the sisters who make up Larkin Poe, a country-tinged band from Atlanta that last night set Mercury Lounge ablaze with a pressure-cooked set of songs. Fresh off an appearance backing up Kristian Bush on the Today Show and not far removed from a tour opening as a duo for Elvis Costello (“We got to stay on his tour bus,” admitted older sister Megan Lovell excitedly), they looked and sounded ready to be doing their own thing again. “It feels so good to be back with the full band,” the younger Rebecca Lovell candidly told the crowd. The exposure and experiences the pair were able to rustle up in the last year or two must have been fun, but you could see they are now dead set on focusing that momentum on Larkin Poe.

That starts with their first full-length, Kin, released last week, an album full of sweet melodies juxtaposed with bluesy grit often materialized in the form of Rebecca’s straight guitar licks or Megan’s atmospheric slide-guitar playing. Larkin Poe played most of the album last night, and as good as those songs sound in headphones, they’re even more of a force to hear in person. And if Larkin Poe can find a way to use the sisters’ music-industry momentum to attract more ears, the sky’s the limit. —Sean O’Kane

Photos courtesy of Sean O’Kane | seanokanephoto.com

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A Little Bit of Everything with Conor Oberst and Dawes

July 30th, 2014

Conor Oberst and Dawes – SummerStage – July 29, 2014

Conor Oberst and Dawes – SummerStage – July 29, 2014
Going into last night’s Conor Oberst show, I really had no idea what to expect. I hadn’t seen him perform since 2005 at Webster Hall, when he was feverishly touring behind the concurrent releases I’m Wide Awake, It’s Morning and Digital Ash in a Digital Urn. Would last night’s SummerStage crowd be made up of the same sort of screaming diehards who used to fill venues for his shows? Or would it be people who had found out about him later in life, perhaps just fans of his solo career? Turns out, those in attendance, much like the hour-and-a-half set they witnessed, were a refreshing mix of everything.

Backed throughout the night by the terrific opening band, Dawes—and occasionally some auxiliary members—Oberst began the set with “Time Forgot,” the opening track from his newest album, Upside Down Mountain. The song set the tone of much of what was to come, with Oberst strumming the rhythms (often on an acoustic guitar) behind his still sometimes trembling voice while lush melodies were sung and played behind him by the shape-shifting band. Considering the effort some other artists put into separating their solo careers from the bands that made them famous, I was surprised by how much of the set was filled with Bright Eyes songs. Oberst didn’t just play the obvious ones, like “Lover I Don’t Have to Love,” either. Early on, the crowd gleefully sang along to “We Are Nowhere and It’s Now” and “Hit the Switch,” each from those 2005 releases, and deeper cuts like the cheeky “Bowl of Oranges.” The expanded sound benefitted many of his more folkie songs extremely well, adding bounce to the already bouncy “Danny Callahan” and nearly turning the encore-capping “Another Travelin’ Song” into a soul revival with horns shouting over the tune’s furious pace.

The night’s most poignant moment just might have been the slow-burning country ballad “Poison Oak,” which began with just Oberst and Dawes’s Wylie Gelber and Taylor Goldsmith before it blossomed into a raging full-band sound as the song crested. Throughout all of this, the crowd hung on every moment. Fanatic adoration still pays a big part in the dynamic of Oberst’s performances, with concertgoers shouting at nonsensical moments, or loudly professing their love for the man while loosely mouthing the lyrics. But last night’s show proved that many of his fans have come a long way since the days of Bright Eyes—just as Oberst has. It’s a progression that’s stark when viewed after nine years of missing out, but it’s still just as rewarding to see. —Sean O’Kane

Photos courtesy of Mina K

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Conor Oberst and Dawes Play SummerStage Tomorrow Night

July 28th, 2014

He’s known for his trembling voice, fine acoustic-guitar playing and evocative storytelling, and on his sixth and most recent solo release, Upside Down Mountain (stream it below), Bright Eyes frontman Conor Oberst is in as fine form as ever. Perhaps thanks in part to coproducer Jonathan Wilson, the LP takes Oberst (above, doing “Time Forgot” for WFUV FM) in a newish direction, delving into that ’70s AM rock made most famous in Laurel Canyon. Per Rolling Stone’s David Fricke: “A sumptuous immersion in ’70s California folk pop, it is the most immediately charming album he has ever made,” further adding, “but Like Neil Young’s Harvest and Jackson Browne’s Late for the Sky, this is dreaming stalked by despair, then charged with rebound.” Now out on the road in support of Upside Down Mountain, Oberst is playing live with Dawes, the modern California four-piece closely associated with that Laurel Canyon sound (perhaps unfairly). And tomorrow night at SummerStage, Dawes open the show and then perform a set with Conor Oberst.

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Conor Oberst and Dawes Throw Record-Release Party

May 21st, 2014

Conor Oberst/Dawes – Rough Trade NYC – May 20, 2014

Conor Oberst/Dawes – Rough Trade NYC – May 20, 2014
The inspired pairing of Conor Oberst and Dawes, who have teamed up on tour in support of Oberst’s latest offering, Upside Down Mountain, threw a sold-old record-release party last night at Rough Trade NYC, a lively show full of mutual admiration and camaraderie, replete with a multitude of intra-band fist bumps. New songs like “Double Life” and “Time Forgot” cover Oberst’s signature introspective lyrical territory, and although the climax of “Desert Island Questionnaire” last night reminded us that Oberst likes to get loud and aggressive too, Upside Down Mountain is primarily a gentle, subtle album.

Dawes delivered a solid opening set of their own before beautifully fleshing out Oberst’s songs, lending a warm and roots-y vibe with occasional twang, and more than kept up as Oberst indulged in those louder moments. With a catalog as large and prolific as Oberst’s, having recorded and released music for more than two decades of his young life, he has the ability to curate a unique live experience by pairing new material with complementary songs from his long list of older work.

Last night, Oberst tapped into our collective nostalgia with “Hit the Switch,” “Old Soul Song” and “We Are Nowhere and It’s Now,” songs that were all released nearly 10 years ago, during a period of songwriting that contained an intimacy much like that found on Upside Down Mountain. A true celebration with his new friends onstage and old friends in the crowd, Oberst seemed happy and grateful to introduce his new collection of songs, and we were certainly happy to receive them. —Alena Kastin

Photos courtesy of Dana (distortion) Yavin | distortionpix.com

(Conor Oberst and Dawes play SummerStage on 7/29.)

 

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Five Questions with … Jonathan Wilson

February 11th, 2014

Jonathan Wilson is a talented guy. He’s done production work for musicians like Father John Misty, Dawes and Chris Robinson. Plus he’s put out his own excellent albums filled with a unique mix of folk, psychedelic rock and R&B, including last year’s Fanfare (stream it below). Wilson has also performed with big-time names like Robbie Robertson, Phil Lesh, Bob Weir and Jackson Browne—while he and his band have won over audiences across the globe, touring on their own and alongside Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. Jonathan Wilson (above, performing “Trials of Jonathan”) plays The Bowery Ballroom tomorrow night with Laraaji and Music Hall of Williamsburg on Friday with the Blank Tapes. And ahead of those shows, he answered Five Questions for The House List.

Which New York City musician—past or present—would you most like to play with?
Laraaji, and on February 12th we will be doing just that. It’s a dream come true, as I listen to his music almost every day.

Where do you like to hang out in NYC? And do you ever feel like you could live here?
I always like the East Village and the Lower East Side. I like going up to midtown for the nostalgic experience of when I used to visit NYC as a kid. I’ll try to catch a jazz show when I’m there. It’s the last place on earth with any jazz scene. I’d like to live in NYC again some day, sure.

Do you have to be depressed to write a sad song? Do you have to be in love to write a love song? Is a song better when it really happened to you?
I’m not sure if a song is better if it really happened to the writer. Certain songs are. Like today in the world of rustic Americana banjo totin’, there seems to be a lot of hobo-centric songs about jumping trains to ol’ Virginny and the like. I doubt many young banjo frailers have ever done that, but they still can convince many a listener they have … or maybe it just inspires someone to dream or to ponder a yonder time. Nothing wrong with that. Music many times is fantastical and complete fiction, but everyone loves great fiction, right?

Behind Gentle Spirit, you played the early show at Mercury Lounge a couple of years ago. But following the release of Fanfare, this time you’re playing two shows in much bigger rooms. Is that just a local thing, or have you found you and your music are getting more recognition across the country?
Indeed, we are very excited to play these wonderful rooms. It is quite a jump since the last shows in NYC, but we have been touring pretty much nonstop since then, and the band has gained some great fans and support along the way. We are getting much more recognition across the globe, which is such an amazing feeling. The records are getting bigger, more complex, and the live show is as well. These are good times for us.

What goes into choosing a song to cover, like “Isn’t It a Pity,” “One More Cup of Coffee” or even “La Isla Bonita”? Does it have to do with liking those songs as a kid—or is it just about what moves you now?
In the case of “La Isla,” yes, there is certainly an affinity from childhood. Most of the others are just songs that have spoken to me, that I find a kinship with—songs I want to honor. Songs I want to bring back into someone’s day. —R. Zizmor

 

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Dawes – Terminal 5 – June 22, 2013

June 24th, 2013


Photos courtesy of Sean O’Kane | seanokanephoto.com

(Dawes play the Capitol Theatre on 7/24.)
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Dawes Play Terminal 5 with Shovels & Rope Tomorrow Night

June 21st, 2013

Since forming in Southern California four years ago, the guys in Dawes—Taylor Goldsmith (vocals and guitar), Wylie Gelber (bass), Griffin Goldsmith (drums) and Tay Strathairn (keys)—have won over fans across the land with their high-energy live shows and three albums—North Hills, Nothing Is Wrong and this year’s Stories Don’t End (stream it below)—filled with tightly written songs, quality harmonies and some good old-fashioned guitar love. But one of the most interesting things about Dawes (above, doing “If I Wanted Someone” at last year’s Lollapalooza) is the vast array of bands and musicians with whom they’ve been associated. They’ve been compared to the Band, for their lyrics, and Crosby, Stills & Nash, for their harmonies. They’ve crisscrossed the country and teamed up with their musical brothers-in-arms, Deer Tick and Delta Spirit. And in the band’s infancy, they took part in jam sessions at Jonathan Wilson’s house with the likes of Chris Robinson, Benmont Tench and Conor Oberst. But after finding success, Dawes went on to back some of the biggest names in rock royalty, Robbie Robertson, Jackson Browne and John Fogerty. Plus, at the most epic night of music The House List has ever had the privilege to witness, they inspired one of the loudest sing-alongs Levon Helm’s Midnight Ramble had seen with their anthemic “When My Time Comes.” But, really, why are we telling you all this? So you don’t miss them with talented indie-folk duo Shovels & Rope tomorrow night at Terminal 5.

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A Dynamic Double Bill

October 27th, 2011

Blitzen Trapper/Dawes – Webster Hall – October 26, 2011


It seems like an easy enough formula: Step 1: Write great songs. Step 2: Play ’em live all over the country. Step 3: Success. Of course, it’s that first part that’s the trick. But last night two bands showed how it’s done in front of a sold-out Webster Hall. The first part of the double bill was Blitzen Trapper, which, at times, seemed to have built an entire irresistible sound solely out of musical discoveries buried in the Band’s “Up on Cripple Creek.” Working through material off their new album, American Goldwing, the band was a study in guitars and harmonies and well-placed embellishments, like harmonicas and Moog synth. Like on the album, they opened with the crunchy rock of “Might Find It Cheap,” exclaiming “…but you’ll never find it for free!” Frontman Eric Earley has one of those voices that you hear on a CD and just can’t wait to match the face to the voice.

Two or three guitars—acoustic and electric—mixed with keys, drums and bass, and each sound was like a single string, strummed together to make a pitch-perfect chord. Blitzen Tapper’s songs were superlatively realized and set a Gothic landscape, with tunes like “Astronaut” and standout “Black River Killer” off Furr. The title track brought out a unique mix of synth, slide guitar and harmonica, making otherworldly music out of everyday objects. The group made plenty of room for guitar solos and short jams, always highlighting the powerful melodies and songwriting prowess. Closing with “Fletcher,” the tale of a guy who perhaps had too much to drink to take the wheel, the set was musical storytelling and roots rock at its absolute finest.

Watching Dawes play New York City over the past couple of years is like tracking data points on a plot that’s continually progressing upward. The question is how high will it go and when will they get there? Taylor Goldsmith and Co. were all smiles as usual, working most of the material off their acclaimed Nothing Is Wrong album. Goldsmith has that “he looks like someone I know” kind of appearance and an “I know a guy like that” stage presence—the type that can’t stand still, with permanently tousled hair and might have a guitar strap with his name on it. But not many of us know a guy who writes love songs like Goldsmith does, with the conversational lyrics and just-right melodies.

Although there was plenty of energy from the band, the strength seemed to come from the quiet moments, like on “Million Dollar Bill,” which was good enough to melt the hearts of the ladies in the crowd and keep their dates’ heads bopping. The set built momentum as it went, peaking with a big guitar jam in “Peace in the Valley” that Goldsmith treated like calisthenics across the stage and then when drummer Griffin Goldsmith sang a great cover version of “Kodachrome” before turning the lights on the crowd for the joyfully inevitable “When My Time Comes.” —A. Stein

Photos courtesy of JC McIlwaine | www.jcmcilwaine.com