Tag Archives: Eric Krasno

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The Revivalists – SummerStage – August 10, 2017

August 11th, 2017


Photos courtesy of Joe Papeo | www.irocktheshot.com

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Galactic – Terminal 5 – March 26, 2016

March 28th, 2016

Galactic – Terminal 5 – March 26, 2016

Photos courtesy of Marc Millman Photography | www.marcmillmanphotos.com/music

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Galactic and Soulive Team Up at Terminal 5 on Saturday Night

March 24th, 2016

NOLA-based instrumental-funk outfit GalacticJeff Raines (guitar), Stanton Moore (drums), Robert Mercurio (bass), Ben Ellman (sax) and Richard Vogel (keys)—have been bringing their shake-your-ass music to the masses for more than two decades. They’re basically a traveling party, which means they always show up with guests. And Saturday night at Terminal 5 is no exception. Galactic (above, performing “Right On” for World Cafe) will feature vocalist Erica Falls and swamp-funk-loving member of the Neville Brothers, the Meters and Wild Tchoupitoulas, Cyril Neville. Plus, other instrumental-illness purveyors Alan Evans (drums), Neal Evans (Hammond B3 organ) and Eric Krasno (guitar)—better known as the Brooklyn soul-funk trio Soulive (below, covering “Eleanor Rigby” and “I Want You (She’s So Heavy)”)—are also on this incredibly strong Saturday night bill. And if that weren’t enough, the show kicks off with Austin, Texas, psychedelic four-piece Bright Light Social Hour. This is one not to miss.

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A 75th Birthday Bash Full of Smiles and Classic Rock

March 17th, 2015

Phil Lesh – Capitol Theatre – March 16, 2015

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This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Grateful Dead and, if you haven’t noticed, their music seems to be everywhere, a constant presence that transcends genre, age and geography. Part of that constant presence has been the band’s bassist, Phil Lesh, who, remarkably, turned 75 on Sunday and is celebrating (how else?) with a run of jam-filled shows at the Capitol Theatre. Monday night’s band of Lesh’s friends included Warren Haynes of the Allman Brothers Band and Gov’t Mule on guitar and vocals, Eric Krasno of Soulive on the other guitar, and longtime Lesh running mates John Molo and Rob Barraco on drums and keyboards respectively. The evening began with a session of noodling: free-form, aqueous improvisation that featured all five musicians interacting with the others, like wolves licking their chops before devouring helpless prey.

The set proper bounced back and forth between the Dead’s repertoire, older blues-based material like “Dupree’s Diamond Blues” and “Cosmic Charlie” interleaved with later-era groove-rockers like “West L.A. Fadeaway” and “Alabama Getaway.” Of course, the songs themselves were merely starting points for various shades of space-outs and left-turn excursions. The walls of the Capitol Theatre were populated in tie-dyed fractal explosions that seemed to open up wormholes to past eras, 20, 30, 40 years back. Krasno’s clean-toned guitar played counterpoint to Haynes’s gritty licks, but Lesh was the constant force, running circles around his younger crew. Each measure of bass playing was a snowflake— clear, defined crystal, beautifully unique. The first set ended with an optimistic spring theme: “Here Comes Sunshine” brought a projected sunrise to the theater’s walls with Lesh pushing Haynes and Molo while Baracco glued together the sonic collage, segueing into the Allman Brothers classic “Blue Sky,” the ceiling turning a bright indigo as Haynes ceded the floor for Krasno and Baracco solos before shining his own big, Allmans-y turn.

The second set picked up where the first left off, another round of free jamming, Lesh slithering through multiple THC-soaked themes before charging through a few more covers: Traffic’s “Dear Mr. Fantasy” and Hendrix’s version of “All Along the Watchtower” and later Van Morrison’s “Into the Mystic,” the band cracking open classic-rock radio and lacing it with LSD-inspired psychedelia. There’s often a concern with the various Dead-cover outfits about who will sing which song, but really it’s not a problem because the guy next to you will (probably) know most of the words and sing it out, loud and proud. The smiles and the twirling dancers were as integral to these shows as the weird set-list variations like the traditional “Help on the Way” > “Slipknot” > “Franklin’s Tower” being split up by “Just a Little Light” and “Uncle John’s Band” as the quintet mostly pulled off Monday night. Krasno shined best during the closing section, finding comfort in build-up solos and going toe-to-toe with Haynes. A supercharged ovation brought back the band for an emotional “Stella Blue,” Haynes belting it out as those in the smiling audience sang along, many swaying in one another’s arms. But no smiles were bigger than the constant one on the 75 year old leading the way. —A. Stein | @Neddyo

(See Phil Lesh play the Capitol Theatre on Thursday night.)

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Greensky Bluegrass Use a Little Bit of Everything to Brooklyn

January 30th, 2015

Greensky Bluegrass – Brooklyn Bowl – January 29, 2015

(Photo: Chris Monaghan)

(Photo: Chris Monaghan)

“We’re a bluegrass band.” That’s what members of Greensky Bluegrass kept announcing between songs at last night’s sold-out show at Brooklyn Bowl. At first, I was like, “Duh, it’s in your name!” But after a few decidedly out-there jams, I finally picked up on the very bluegrass joke. They definitely have the proper instrumentation (banjo, guitar, dobro, mandolin, bass), and they can play comfortably in the genre—but Greensky Bluegrass were playing with a jam-band style in rock club beneath a light show suitable for an EDM show. (Yes, Greensky Bluegrass are one of the few bands I’ve seen bring their own lighting rig.)

The set began with a dobro-heavy “Just to Lie” that showed off their abilities in the standard-bluegrass region before quickly going off course into a darker, minor-key piece with the lights following suit. This led to some deep hallucinogenic jamming that featured excellent playing from each of the band’s instrumentalists, with multiple build-and-release moments that prompted a healthy “whoop” from the packed house. Twenty minutes later, the opening sequence finally came to a climactic end. The crowd and band now settled in, Greensky crafted a two-set show filled with genre-straddling songs and jams, deftly flipping between the more traditional and progressive and whatever it is that’s beyond that. The lights followed suit, zipping through all of the colors of the rainbow and beyond, sometimes in unexpected combinations—an apt visual metaphor for the music being made. NYC jam-guest extraordinaire Eric Krasno came out for the first-set-closing cover of Norton Buffalo’s “Ain’t No Bread in the Breadbox,” a song made popular by Jerry Garcia but perfectly suited for a duel between dobro player Anders Beck and Krasno.

Things got even deeper during the second set, which opened with a dark, country-rock “Bring Out Your Dead.” The second guest of the night, Andy Falco of the Infamous Stringdusters, came out to help on Bill Monroe’s “Working on a Building,” yellow spotlights emanating from the stage like beams from the sun, before jamming out admirably on a David Grisman number. Throughout the second set, Greensky Bluegrass started in a place that felt recognizably connected to bluegrass but would then venture far into something different. The closing song was a prime example, the music dipped into an almost trance jam before returning to the theme and then running off again exploring in impressive fashion. The encore seemed designed to ground everyone again, Greensky calling out Krasno once more to help with a cover of the Allman Brothers’ “Midnight Rider,” the crowd singing along at full volume, and the bluegrass band doing a pretty good Southern rock impression with a little help from their friend.—A. Stein | @Neddyo

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Bowlive 5 Kicks Off Tomorrow Night at Brooklyn Bowl

March 12th, 2014

The soul-funk trio SouliveAlan Evans (drums), Neal Evans (Hammond B3) and Eric Krasno (guitar)—formed in the late ’90s and have been bringing their own bluesy, jammy brand of jazz, funk, classic rock and R&B to the dancing masses ever since. Krasno joined the brothers Evans for a recording session in Woodstock in 1999, which eventually became their first EP, Get Down! A host of studio albums, EPs and live discs followed, including 2010’s instrumental take on the Beatles, Rubber Soulive. But despite the trio’s recorded virtuosity, far and away the best way to experience these guys is live. Which works out great because with Bowlive 5 beginning tomorrow, you’ve got eight chances to see them in person. That’s right: Soulive (above, covering “Soul Serenade” with guests) play Brooklyn Bowl eight times between tomorrow and 3/22.

And as always, there will be special guests galore, like Nigel Hall, DJ Logic and the Shady Horns tomorrow, George Porter Jr., Nicki Bluhm, Leroy Justice and the Shady Horns on Friday, the London Souls, George Porter Jr., Nicki Bluhm and the Shady Horns on Saturday, John Scofield, Jon Cleary and the Shady Horns on 3/18, Susan Tedeschi, Joe Russo, Jon Cleary and the Shady Horns on 3/19, DMC (of Run DMC), Talib Kweli, Alan Evans Trio and the Shady Horns on 3/20Marco Benevento, Roosevelt Collier, Sonya Kitchell and the Shady Horns on 3/21, and finally Bill Evans, Wolf! featuring Scott Metzger and the Shady Horns on 3/22.

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Lettuce Make an Impression at Brooklyn Bowl

December 23rd, 2013

Lettuce – Brooklyn Bowl – December 20, 3013

(Photo: Jared Levy)

Words can’t explain funk. A groove is felt, but when the music stops the feeling fades away. Any attempt to remember the sounds and reflect on the experience is doomed to muddle the truth: that some musical moments happen and then vanish. What can be related, though, is the impression, the lingering feeling, before it’s lost to time. And what can be remembered about Lettuce at Brooklyn Bowl on Friday night is that it felt perfectly right.

For those unfamiliar with Lettuce, the band name doesn’t give much insight, nor does it relate to anything in particular. Instead, the musicians who perform under the name bring their own meaning to the leafy vegetable: playful, soulful and fresh. More plaudits can be applied, but again, this is the cheap press for a band that is better heard than explained. Whether its Eric Krasno’s chatty guitar solos with his mouth moving, half-speaking words to notes, or the playful rhythm section of Erick Coomes on bass and Adam Deitch on drums, there is much to see and hear, and less to write in response.

Except there are those moments that a watchful eye can observe and report, how Neal Evans, who plays with Krasno in the prodigious funk-jazz trio Soulive, directed the horn section for blazing renditions of “Lettansanity” and “Madison Square.” Or how Alecia Chakour and Nigel Hall brought their vocal talents to soul songs from the ’70s to the present. It’s a glimpse into the performance, a snapshot from moving picture. It’s the best that can be done. Now it’s up to you: Go out, hear and see for yourself. —Jared Levy

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Soulive – Brooklyn Bowl – March 16, 2013

March 18th, 2013


Photos courtesy of Michael Jurick | music.jurick.net

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Get Ready for Bowlive IV: Eight Crazy Nights in Brooklyn

March 6th, 2013

The soul-funk trio Soulive—Alan Evans (drums), Neal Evans (Hammond B3) and Eric Krasno (guitar)—formed in the late ’90s and has been bringing its own bluesy, jammy brand of jazz, funk, classic rock and R&B to the dancing masses ever since. Krasno joined the brothers Evans for a recording session in Woodstock in 1999, which eventually became their first EP, Get Down! A host of studio albums, EPs and live discs followed, including 2010’s instrumental take on the Beatles, Rubber Soulive. But despite the trio’s recorded virtuosity, far and away the best way to experience these guys is live. Which works out great because with Bowlive IV beginning tomorrow, you’ve got eight chances to see them in person. That’s right: Soulive (above, in highlights of last year’s Bowlive) play Brooklyn Bowl eight times between now and 3/16.

And as always, there will be special guests galore, like Luther and Cody Dickinson of the North Mississippi Allstars on Thursday, Robert Randolph, Lee Fields and the Expressions, and Sister Sparrow & the Dirty Birds on Friday, Nigel Hall, DJ Logic and the Alecia Chakour Band on Saturday, a tribute to Stax Records with Booker T. Jones on 3/12Los Lobos frontman David Hidalgo and the London Souls on 3/13, George Porter Jr. and the Shady Horns on 3/14, Leo Nocentelli, George Porter Jr. and the Shady Horns on 3/15, and the Alecia Shakour Band and the Shady Horns on 3/16. Plus, this is Bowlive, and the only way to know which unannounced special guests will show up is if you show up yourself.

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Come Shake It at the Royal Family Ball on Saturday Night

October 18th, 2012

New York City’s own Royal Family Records is having a party on Saturday night at Terminal 5, and you’re invited. Two of the label’s acts, funk-jazz trio Soulive and the band’s even funkier offshoot, Lettuce, will headline the show. But what’s a party without guests? And this fiesta’s guests are pretty special: sax legend Maceo Parker (perhaps best known for his work alongside James Brown in the ’60s and Parliament-Funkadelic in the ’70s), pedal-steel virtuoso Robert Randolph and soulful singer Ledisi. It’ll be a night of tight funk, cool jazz, choice covers and great sit-ins. So do yourself a favor: Check out the video, above, to know what kind of music you can expect, and then come join the party. Just be prepared to get down.