Tag Archives: Felice Brothers

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Conor Oberst – Celebrate Brooklyn – July 20, 2017

July 21st, 2017


Photos courtesy of Mike Benigno | mikebenigno.com

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Conor Oberst Headlines Celebrate Brooklyn in Prospect Park

July 18th, 2017

What a thrilling ride it’s been to watch Conor Oberst (above, performing “Tachycardia” at the Sydney Opera House) grow up. Beginning his insanely prolific singer-songwriter career, as Bright Eyes, at the ripe age of 13, Oberst’s releases have tested the limits of multiple genres (check out his politically charged punk band Desaparecidos if you need proof) all while strengthening his skills as one of the best lyricists of the past 20 years. And while it might be lazy to throw out the Dylan comparisons, hey, they both grew up in the Midwest. There must be something in the water? Oberst has put out records in the past under his own name accompanied by the Mystic Valley Band, but his 2008 eponymous album (stream it below) was truly his first solo venture. Last year’s Ruminations (stream it below) went further down that path as he stripped down his songs to their ribcages with only Oberst playing guitar, piano and the occasional harmonica. He later released a full-band companion version of that album titled Salutations with Catskill Mountains’ favorite sons the Felice Brothers acting as his backing band. Oberst and the Felice Brothers will bring songs from his entire career to the Prospect Park Bandshell on Thursday for an electrifying night of music. Philly rock royalty Hop Along and Brooklyn’s own Big Thief will open. Show up early so you don’t miss these two great bands for what will be one of the most stacked bills of the summer. —Pat King | @MrPatKing

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Three Nights of Shovels & Rope in New York City

October 14th, 2016

As Shovels & Rope, married singer-songwriters (and multi-instrumentalists) Cary Ann Hearst and Michael Trent make country and bluegrass music from a folk-rock perspective. Thanks to their harmonies, they’ve earned comparisons to Johnny and June Carter Cash. And thanks to early tours with the likes of the Felice Brothers and Justin Townes Earle, the Charleston, S.C., duo became road warriors before entering the studio to record their acclaimed first LP, O’ Be Joyful (stream it below), out in 2012. Their latest LP, Little Seeds (stream it below), just came out last Friday, and it’s “an album of growth in every way,” according to PopMatters. “Hearst and Trent have grown emotionally through the joys and sorrows of recent years. Playing all the instruments here, they demonstrate their continuing growth as musicians. And Trent’s production, too, shows incredible depth and agility. The sound of this record is raw and alive. It’s a hell of a ride.” Find out how the new music sounds live when Shovels & Rope (above, performing “I Know” for KXT FM) play Music Hall of Williamsburg on Monday and The Bowery Ballroom on Tuesday and Wednesday. And as an added bonus, Delta Spirit frontman Matthew Logan Vasquez opens each show.

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Deer Tick Don’t Need a Reason to Throw a Party

December 29th, 2014

Deer Tick – Brooklyn Bowl – December 28, 2014

Deer Tick – Brooklyn Bowl – December 28, 2014
If Deer Tick have proved anything over the past 10 years, it’s that they don’t need an excuse to celebrate: Their shows are always equal parts rock concert and private party. So when there really is a reason to throw a bash, like, say, their 10-year anniversary this month, well, they really go all out. Sunday night found them halfway into a six-night New Year’s run at Brooklyn Bowl, each date featuring special guests and album covers and plenty of surprises. Last night’s first set was Deer Tick’s take on Meet the Beatles, an interesting selection to say the least. Wearing matching custom bowling shirts commemorating the anniversary, they got things moving with spot-on renditions of the opening one-two of “I Want to Hold Your Hand” and “I Saw Her Standing There.” McCauley’s Providence, R.I., growl provided a Deer Tick warmth to the well-known songs. He joked that he would sing the Lennon parts, Ian O’Neil would sing the McCartney parts, but they had no George Harrison, so they invited the night’s first guest, Taylor Goldsmith of Dawes, to sing “Don’t Bother Me.” His manic presence on vocals loosened the band a little. Later the Felice Brothers’ James Felice played accordion to the same effect, punctuating a set that was equally fun for the band and packed house alike.

Following a short break, just McCauley and Goldsmith returned to play as “Little Brother,” performing material from the Middle Brother collaboration they were involved in a few years ago. The audience went quiet at once, savoring the special treat while the duet spun a stellar four-song mini-set that included “Daydreaming,” “Thanks for Nothing” and “Million Dollar Bill,” the stage dappled in colored lights adding to the special feeling in the room. By the time Deer Tick proper took the stage to play their own material, it felt like we’d already been treated to a celebration worthy of 10 years, but of course the guys had plenty more in the tank, pulling out rarities like “Hand in My Hand” and crowd-favorite sing-alongs like “Main Street,” which anchored the strongest stretch of the evening.

Just when things felt like they were winding down, Deer Tick brought out the Replacements’ Tommy Stinson to lead a couple of songs, including a barn-burning version of the Who’s “The Kids Are Alright” that had Dennis Ryan impressively going all Keith Moon behind the kit. It didn’t seem possible to top that, but Deer Tick had no problem trying, bringing about a dozen guests onstage, including Stinson, Goldsmith, Felice as well as Robert Ellis and opener Joe Fletcher, all in their own bowling shirts, I might add. They led the crowd in a rousing version of “Goodnight, Irene” that was appropriately epic to end a weeklong celebration. But it really only marked the midway point of the week and, who knows, maybe their career. But one thing’s for sure, Deer Tick are just getting started.
—A. Stein | @Neddyo

Photos courtesy of Joe Papeo | www.irocktheshot.com

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The Felice Brothers Bring New Music to Webster Hall Tomorrow

July 8th, 2014

The Felice Brothers—led by brothers Ian (vocals, guitar), James (accordion, organ and vocals) and Simone (drums, guitar and vocals)—originally from the Catskills in upstate New York, first got started by playing their dad’s barbecues. Eventually they made their way to Brooklyn and began busking in various New York City subway stations. Since then, their roots-rock sound has taken them to Mountain Jam, Bonnaroo even Levon Helm’s barn for one of his now-legendary Midnight Rambles. But as the group has grown in size and stature (although Simone has departed to front his own band), there’s been no shortage of recorded music. On their previous studio release, Celebration, Florida (stream it below), the group successfully mined new musical terrain, employing electronic and synth sounds (think: less Basement Tapes and more hip-hop). But the Felice Brothers (above, doing “Meadow of a Dream”) return to their earthy roots with the recently released Favorite Waitress (stream it below), out last month. American Songwriter declares, “This is challenging Americana that never takes its audience, or its influences, for granted.” And Consequence of Sound calls the album “a return to their bare-bones roots music,” while adding, “the Felice Brothers have elevated their songwriting without losing their rambunctious charm.” Of course, these guys are most well known for their rollicking live performances, and they just so happen to play Webster Hall tomorrow night. Gifted singer-songwriter Robert Ellis opens the show.

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Shovels & Rope & You Tomorrow Night

September 11th, 2013

As Shovels & Rope, married singer-songwriters (and multi-instrumentalists) Cary Ann Hearst and Michael Trent make country and bluegrass music from a folk-rock perspective. Thanks to their harmonies, they’ve earned comparisons to Johnny and June Carter Cash. And thanks to early tours with the likes of the Felice Brothers and Justin Townes Earle,
the Charleston, S.C., duo became road warriors before entering the studio to record their acclaimed first LP, O’ Be Joyful (stream it below), out last year. According to the Observer: “Their debut album is a delight, from the uncomplicated bluesy strut of ‘Tickin’ Bomb’ to the brass inflections on the knowingly tongue-in-cheek ‘Hail Hail.’” But it all comes together best live. So go see Shovels & Rope (above, performing “Lay Low” at Electric Lady Studios for WFUV FM) onstage tomorrow night at Webster Hall.

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Diamond Doves Lead Packed Bill Tonight at Mercury Lounge

July 18th, 2013

Chances are you’ve already seen Diamond Doves before and didn’t even know it. Maybe it was when they were Elvis Perkins’ bitchin’, bendable backing band, In Dearland. Or maybe it was as the special-guest horn section for My Morning Jacket or Bon Iver (amongst others) … or opening for Marco Benevento or the Felice Brothers. Not an accident that these guys are called upon to play with the best, but they’re much more than just someone else’s horn section. On their own, they’re a fully hyphenated folk-psych-rock multi-instrumentalist trio, equal parts the Beatles and the Band. They top a jam-packed bill, including Brooklyn’s Caged Animals, tonight at Mercury Lounge. —A. Stein

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Josh Ritter Returns to Terminal 5 Tomorrow Night

May 17th, 2013

Growing up in Idaho, Josh Ritter heard the Bob Dylan/Johnny Cash version of “Girl from the North Country” on his parents’ copy of Nashville Skyline and knew he wanted to become a songwriter. Some dreams do come true, because years later, Ritter was named one of the 100 Greatest Living Songwriters by Paste magazine. The folk-leaning singer-songwriter has earned favorable comparisons to Dylan, Bruce Springsteen and Leonard Cohen (or as Mary-Louise Parker says, he “is usually compared to the legends, the ones you have been listening to since you were 15, the ones you love most”), and he’s put out a considerable amount of material on EPs and full-length albums. The most recent of which, The Beast in Its Tracks, written in the wake of the dissolution of his marriage, came out earlier this year. In praising it, American Songwriter calls it “a gracious, relentlessly honest, post-breakup record.” And Josh Ritter (above, playing “Joy to You Baby” on Late Show with David Letterman) has been out on the road, touring with the Royal City Band, ever since. See them tomorrow night at Terminal 5. And as an added bonus, the Felice Brothers, on their last night on the tour, will open the show.

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Modest Mouse/Felice Brothers – The Wellmont Theatre – July 20, 2012

July 23rd, 2012

Modest Mouse

Photos courtesy of JC McIlwaine | jcmcilwaine.com

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The Felice Brothers – Webster Hall – September 29, 2011

September 30th, 2011


Photos courtesy of JC McIlwaine | www.jcmcilwaine.com