Tag Archives: Forest Hills Stadium

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My Morning Jacket Return to NYC to Play Forest Hills Stadium

July 12th, 2017

Louisville, Ky., road warriors My Morning Jacket are known for their wildly entertaining, energetic live performances deftly covering material from their seven studio albums, including 2015’s The Waterfall (stream it below), with a well-placed cover or two sprinkled throughout their set. They have a sum-of-their-parts sound—with each performer locked in unison—that still allows all five members room to shine. Frontman Jim James and guitarist Carl Broemel—perhaps the band’s secret weapon, at the very front of the stage, his hair furiously swaying in harmony with his slashing guitar—play in, at and around each other over the course of the entire two-plus-hours show, oftentimes face to face. But despite the fiery duo’s considerable presence, it’s Patrick Hallahan’s ferocious drumming, Tom Blankenship’s forward-thrusting bass (no more so than on “The Dark”) and Bo Koster’s subtle keys work that drive everything forward, one song into the next, often with an effortless-sounding segue. On Saturday at Forest Hills Stadium, My Morning Jacket (above, performing “Phone Went West” at Red Rocks), who have played New York City shows at rooms as small as Mercury Lounge and as big as Madison Square Garden, roll into Queens in mid-tour form. Guitar hero Gary Clark Jr. opens the show.

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The Replacements – Forest Hills Stadium – September 19, 2014

September 22nd, 2014

The Replacements - Forest Hills Stadium - September 19, 2014

Photos courtesy of Joe Papeo | www.irocktheshot.com

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Spend the Last Friday of Summer with the Replacements

September 17th, 2014

Bob Stinson (guitar), his brother Tommy Stinson (bass) and Chris Mars (drums) were already in a garage-punk outfit when Paul Westerberg (guitar and vocals) joined the band in 1979. The quartet changed their name to the Replacements since under the previous name, the Impediments, they’d been banned from some local Minneapolis clubs, thanks to rowdy behavior. Initially they were compared to another Twin Cities band, Hüsker Dü. But as the Replacements became increasingly known for their wild (drunken?) live performances— and as their sound drifted from punk to jangly alternative rock, including elements of pop and folk—they made a name for themselves, unquestionably emerging as one of the most influential, trailblazing bands of the ’80s, thanks in large part to their energetic live shows and the seven terrific albums they released between 1981 and 1990: Sorry Ma, Forgot to Take Out the Trash (stream it below), Hootenanny (stream it below), Let It Be (stream it below), Tim (stream it below), Pleased to Meet You (stream it below), Don’t Tell a Soul (stream it below) and All Shook Down (stream it below). But eventually things began to go off the rails. They were banned from Saturday Night Live in 1986, and Bob Stinson left the group later that year (and died in 1995). Mars departed in 1990, and then the Replacements closed up shop in the summer of 1991. And that’s where the story would have ended, except that seemingly out of nowhere, Westerberg and Tommy Stinson, joined by other musicians, played six shows last year. Buoyed by the response, they’ve teamed up with drummer Josh Freese and guitarist Dave Minehan to play several shows this year, including Coachella and Boston Calling. And on the heels of triumphantly playing their first hometown show in 23 years, which Billboard called “an absolutely stellar performance from start to finish,” they Replacements (above, performing “Alex Chilton” on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon) are coming to New York City to play Forest Hills Stadium on Friday night with a pair of like-minded, don’t-miss bands, the Hold Steady and Deer Tick. It’s the last Friday of summer, and this is one not to skip.

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Mumford & Sons Revitalize Forest Hills Stadium

August 29th, 2013

Mumford & Sons – Forest Hills Stadium – August 28, 2013


Clouds sat heavily over Forest Hills Stadium last night as thousands of concertgoers filled the seats and standing room of the historic venue to see Mumford & Sonsthe Vaccines and Bear’s Den for the venue’s first concert since 1997. We couldn’t have cared less about the raindrops falling throughout the night, as this inaugural show since the stadium’s reopening was going down in music history. Excitedly, the crowd settled in for lively sets from Bear’s Den and the Vaccines. “I can’t tell you how excited we are to be here,” said Vaccines frontman Justin Young, beaming between songs. Highlights from their set included “Blow It Up,” “Wetsuit,” “All in White” and “I Always Knew.”

As night fell, the crowd jockeyed for the best possible stage view. It seemed as if not a single seat or patch of standing room was empty. Fog filled the stage and the lights dimmed as we heard Mumford & Sons tuning in the dark. Uproarious applause and cheering ensued as the lights came up on the band playing “Lovers’ Eyes,” followed by “Babel.” Marcus Mumford greeted the sold-out stadium: “We just can’t believe you all came—17,000 people on a tennis court? That hasn’t happened for a long time!” The set moved along swiftly, and additional string and brass instruments joined the mix to create an orchestral vibrancy that escalated Mumford & Sons’ anthemic music.

“We’re going to play a song that’s extremely inappropriate considering the humidity,” said Mumford with a chuckle before the band played “Winter Winds.” The foggy low light suited the band well during their subdued numbers, and gleaming spotlights electrified the up-tempo moments. “Timshel,” “Little Lion Man” and “Hopeless Wanderer” had the crowd singing along, entranced. For their encore, the band covered Bruce Springsteen’s “I’m on Fire,” which had many singing along. Mumford & Sons took a break between songs to hit some tennis balls into the crowd using their instruments as tennis racquets. Paying tribute to their initial success, the band played closed the show with “The Cave” and bid the audience a cheerful adieu, cheering on the team that worked so hard to restore the stadium. Judging by the success of last night’s show, Forest Hills Stadium will be home to more sold-out shows in the years to come and reclaim its reputation as a famed music venue. —Schuyler Rooth

Photos courtesy of Diana Wong | dianawongphoto.com