Tag Archives: Lee Fields & the Expressions

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Webster Hall Has You Covered Tonight and Tomorrow

October 17th, 2013

Danny Seim and Justin Harris have been making experimental rock together as Menomena (above, performing “Heavy Is as Heavy Does”) for more than a decade—although they’ve been doing it as a duo only since early 2011. No matter. Last year’s personal and intimate Moms, the band’s fifth LP but first as a twosome, was released to favorable reviews.

While Menomena hail from Portland, Ore., another alternative-rock duo, the Helio Sequence (above, doing “Lately” for KEXP FM), reside not too far west, in Beaverton. Brandon Summers (vocals and guitars) and Benjamin Weikel (drums and keys) teamed up in the late ’90s to do their own take on psychedelic, ambient music. But their sound has evolved over their years becoming more like dream folk on last year’s Negotiations. See both bands, along with Philly rock duo Pattern Is Movement, tonight at Webster Hall.

Lee Fields (above, doing “Ladies” for KEXP FM) has been making music for quite some time. His first album came out in 1969. So he’s been around. He started out in the funk business, earning favorable comparisons to James Brown throughout the ’70s. And while the ’80s were somewhat quiet for him, he returned strong in the ’90s, making bluesy soul music. But since teaming up with local label Truth & Soul and its house band, the Expressions, his music has been reinvigorated. To witness: last year’s excellent Faithful Man, which marries old-school R&B and soul with modern touches.

Nick Waterhouse (above doing “Is That Clear”) may not share the same background as Lee Fields, but the young singer-songwriter-producer from Southern California is still well versed in R&B. His debut album, last year’s Time’s All Gone, reveals an old soul with contemporary style. But truthfully, you’ve got to see him live to take it all in. And you can see him alongside Lee Fields and the Expressions tomorrow night at Webster Hall.

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Lee Fields & the Expressions – Bowery Ballroom – February 15, 2013

February 19th, 2013


Photos courtesy of Jeremy Ross | jeremypross.com

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Five Questions with … Lee Fields

March 16th, 2012


Lee Fields has been making music for quite some time. His first album came out in 1969. So it’s safe to say he’s been around. He started out in the funk business, earning favorable comparisons to James Brown throughout the ’70s. And while the ’80s were somewhat quiet for him, he returned strong in the ’90s, making bluesy soul music. But since teaming up with local label Truth & Soul and its house band, the Expressions, his music has been reinvigorated. To witness: the excellent, just released Faithful Man, which marries old-school R&B and soul with modern touches. Tomorrow, Lee Fields and the Expressions (above, doing “Love Comes and Goes”) play Music Hall of Williamsburg, and in advance of the show, he e-mailed The House List to answer Five Questions.

Over the course of your decades in the music business, what are some of the best changes in the industry?
The creation of e-mail, MP3, YouTube, Facebook and all other social media tools that allow artists to be seen and heard throughout the world at the same time.

Who are your inspirations outside of the music world?
My third-grade teacher, Mrs. Beatrice, who instructed me to learned this poem, and to this day I have never forgotten the words, and these words became my motto of life: “If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. ’Tis the lesson you should heed, try, try again. For then your courage should appear, for you will conquer, never fear. Always keep this rule in view try, try again.”

Do you have any crutches when writing a song—are there certain words or styles you feel you lean on too much?
No, I try to be open-minded and as vigilant as possible regarding public trends, news and whatever affects people’s mindset, because songs are a reflection of the latter.

Do you have to be depressed to write a sad song? Do you have to be in love to write a love song? Is a song better when it really happened to you?
I don’t think a person has to be depressed to write a sad song, but I think a person has to know how it feels to be sad in order to write one. I think in some cases, songs are better when writing about real-life experiences. It mainly depends on one’s ability to write from emotions as distinguished from reason. But in both cases one needs a special talent or skill to chose compassionate words that others may find descriptive of their situations.

At your after-party and there’s an endless jukebox, and The House List gives you a buck. Which three songs are you playing?
Otis Redding, “Security,” Smokey Robinson, “You Really Got a Hold on Me” and James Brown, “Papa’s Got a Brand New Bag.” —R. Zizmor

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Let Your Soul Glow

January 10th, 2011

Lee Fields & the Expressions – The Bowery Ballroom – January 7, 2011

(Photo: Casey Sommers)

(Photo: Casey Sommers)

On Friday night, the Bowery Ballroom audience eagerly awaited Lee Fields, but first an interlude. His very talented backing band, the Expressions—four horns, guitar, bass and drums—took the stage and lit into three tight instrumentals before summoning Fields, 15 minutes later, to the strains of “Gonna Fly Now,” the theme from Rocky. The funk and soul singer, who’s been performing since the ’60s, strutted onstage in a shiny suit and immediately wowed the crowd with his voice and passion and then kept them in shake-it-don’t-break-it mode until the very end.

It was clear that Fields was as happy to be in attendance as those who had paid to be there: With a big smile, he repeatedly shouted, “I love you!” to the audience, and he later called out to his wife, who was sitting upstairs. In between songs, like “Money Is King” and “Ladies,” Fields asked concertgoers close to the stage and the Expressions, who compare favorably to another Brooklyn band, the Dap-Kings, what to play next. With his showmanship, grunts and shouts, it’s easy to liken Fields to James Brown, especially when he covered the Godfather of Soul’s “Bewildered.” —R. Zizmor

Contest

Grow a Pair: Win Free Tickets to See Lee Fields & the Expressions on 1/7

January 4th, 2011

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If you’re into funk, soul and R&B, then you should head to The Bowery Ballroom on Friday. The House List is so sure you’ll like Lee Fields & the Expressions that we’re giving away two tickets. Want to Grow a Pair? Then fill out the form below, including your full name, e-mail address, which show you’re trying to win tickets to (Lee Fields, 1/7) and a brief message explaining why soul music can warm you up on a cold night. Eddie Bruiser, a big Lee Fields fan, will notify the winner by Friday. Good luck.

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