Tag Archives: Lorde

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Grace Mitchell Makes Her NYC Headlining Debut at Mercury Lounge

August 1st, 2017

Portland, Ore., singer-songwriter and mult-instrumentalist Grace Mitchell (above, peforming “Kids (Ain’t All Right)”) quickly earned comparisons to Halsey, Lorde and Lana Del Rey when, still in her mid-teens, she put out a pair of EPs, Design (stream it below) and Raceday (stream it below), in 2014-15, filled with electronic- and R&B-fueled pop. The genre-bending musician has recently been releasing singles, and with a debut long-player due to arrive later this year, she makes her New York City headlining debut tomorrow night at Mercury Lounge. Local electro-pop duo Frances Rose open the show.

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Hana Plays the Late Show at Mercury Lounge on Friday Night

June 15th, 2016

Singer-songwriter and producer Hana burst onto the scene last year with the single “Clay,” which earned her shout-outs from Lorde and Grimes and moved Nylon to proclaim, “Meet the Internet’s newest music obsession” and that the song “was an intimate, stripped-down piece of synth-pop perfection, with a hook that burrows itself into your head and refuses to get out.” Of course, it turns out that Hana (above, doing “Chimera”) wasn’t new at all. Hana Pestle had been releasing EPs since 2008, including this year’s five-track self-titled effort (stream it below). She’s toured with Grimes and Lana Del Rey and now you can see her play Mercury Lounge on Friday night. Electro-pop duo Frances Rose open the show.

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Disclosure Headline a Terrific Bill at Forest Hills Stadium on Saturday

June 14th, 2016

Brothers Guy and Howard Lawrence grew up surrounded by music in South East England. Guy began playing drums when he was just three years old while Howard waited until he was eight years old to pick up the bass. Before either of them reached the ripe old age of 20, they’d already begun making shake-the-floor dance music and uploading it to MySpace. The first Disclosure full-length, Settle (stream it below), arrived in 2013, wowing critics across the globe. PopMatters called it “as perfect a summertime house-party soundtrack as we’re likely to get in 2013. If that’s what you’re looking for—pure pleasure-center appeal—you can stop reading, put the record on, and guiltlessly enjoy Settle on that level alone. But like all great pop musicians, Disclosure knows how to tongue around the edges of genre, subtly exploring a wide range of sounds without ever interrupting the dopamine stream at their music’s center. There are pleasures for the head here, too, along with the heart and the hips.” Following a worldwide tour, Disclosure (above, performing “Magnets” with Lorde on Saturday Night Live) returned last fall with their follow-up, Caracal (stream it below)—notable for collaborations with the Weeknd, Lorde, Miguel and Sam Smith—again winning over critics and fans alike. “Caracal’s inherent pop appeal is in songs underscored by soul and R&B tones that are written with the collaborators in a traditional manner,” according to the A.V. Club. “These are later reimagined into the dance floor–friendly Disclosure-shaped mold.” And when they play Forest Hills Stadium on Saturday night, they won’t be doing it alone. Instead, they’ll be joined by Anderson .Paak & the Free Nationals, Mobb Deep, Dusky and Justin Jay.

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Disclosure Close Out Tour Tomorrow Night at Madison Square Garden

October 23rd, 2015

Brothers Guy and Howard Lawrence grew up surrounded by music in South East England. Guy began playing drums when he was just three years old while Howard waited until he was eight years old to pick up the bass. Before either of them reached the ripe old age of 20, they’d already begun making shake-the-floor dance music and uploading it to MySpace. The first Disclosure full-length, Settle (stream it below), arrived in 2013, wowing critics across the globe. PopMatters called it “as perfect a summertime house-party soundtrack as we’re likely to get in 2013. If that’s what you’re looking for—pure pleasure-center appeal—you can stop reading, put the record on, and guiltlessly enjoy Settle on that level alone. But like all great pop musicians, Disclosure knows how to tongue around the edges of genre, subtly exploring a wide range of sounds without ever interrupting the dopamine stream at their music’s center. There are pleasures for the head here, too, along with the heart and the hips.” Following a worldwide tour, Disclosure (above, performing “Latch” with Sam Smith for AmEx Unstaged) returned just about a month ago with their follow-up, Caracal (stream it below)—notable for collaborations with the Weeknd, Lorde, Miguel and Sam Smith—again winning over critics and fans alike. “Caracal’s inherent pop appeal is in songs underscored by soul and R&B tones that are written with the collaborators in a traditional manner,” according to the A.V. Club. “These are later reimagined into the dance-floor-friendly Disclosure-shaped mold.” And they close out their American tour in style, tomorrow night at Madison Square Garden—and Claude VonStroke, Pomo and Lion Babe open the show.

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At Terminal 5 Banks Proves That Her Star Is Still on the Rise

October 1st, 2014

Banks – Terminal 5 – September 30, 2014

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“New York, I’d die for you,” shrieked Banks last night to the sold-out Terminal 5 crowd, almost in disbelief to be playing her biggest headlining show in the city to date. And rightly so—it’s been barely 18 months since the once mysterious Californian chanteuse began dropping tracks on Soundcloud and gaining traction after Zane Low featured her on BBC Radio 1. Now, it’s clear that Jillian Rose Banks is a star in the making, building more than just a solid Internet following.

Playing off the theme of her recently released debut album, Banks revealed the growth of a real Goddess. There’s an intimacy to each of her gigs, which makes those in the audience feel like they’re the only ones in the room, as she reveals deeply personal lyrics about love and heartbreak. But don’t be fooled, this is one strong woman who makes it known that she’s a force to be reckoned with through her haunting don’t-fuck-with-me vocals. In fact, Banks went all boss during the title track, “Goddess,” flipping the bird at the crowd as if she were M.I.A. at the Super Bowl.

Having attracted some heavyweight producers for her first record, Banks’ live show really brought the likes of TEED’s production work on “Warm Water” to life. One of the night’s clear highlights was her live take on the brooding track with Sohn, “Waiting Game,” and a surprising rendition of a Fugees’ classic, “Fu-Gee-La.” On a final note, Bank’s hipster-Goth-awkward-dance game is something to rival Lorde’s epic double claw. Just saying. —Pip Cowley

 

 

 

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Tina Dico Brings New Music to The Bowery Ballroom Tonight

September 30th, 2014

Inspired by the likes of Bob Dylan and Leonard Cohen, Danish singer-songwriter Tina Dico is most well know for what AllMusic calls “heavenly vocals and a poignant writing style.” After discussions with several labels around the turn of the century proved to be underwhelming, she formed her own label, Finest Gramophone to put out her first album, Fuel (stream it below), back in 2001. Since then, Dico (above, performing “Drifting”) has remained an important presence on the Copenhagen music scene and across Europe. Her most recent release, Whispers (stream it below), came out about a month ago to some fairly high praise, including from the Boston Globe: “As a new generation of smoldering young songstresses, including Lana Del Rey, Lorde and Banks, reaches a wide mainstream audience, it’s the perfect time for the reemergence of Danish singer-songwriter Tina Dico. Her latest studio effort is a richly rewarding, complex reflection on love, loss and acceptance.” See this big-voiced, engaging live performer tonight at The Bowery Ballroom. Josh Mease’s Lapland opens the show.

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The Best Summer Festival Starts Tomorrow Night

September 4th, 2014

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While it might seem like summer ended on Labor Day, not only does it last nearly another three weeks, but also the summer festival with the best lineup kicks off tomorrow night in Boston. That’s right: Boston Calling is back, and how. On Friday night, things get started with the National, Neutral Milk Hotel and Future Islands. And then the rest of the weekend is absolutely packed with Lorde, Childish Gambino, Girl Talk, Volcano Choir, the Hold Steady, Bleachers, Sky Ferreira, S. Carey and Clifflight on Saturday. Plus Sunday brings something for everyone with Nas, the Roots, the Replacements, Spoon, the 1975, Twenty One Pilots, Lake Street Dive, the War on Drugs, White Denim, San Fermin and Gentlemen Hall. So do yourself a favor and ship up to Boston this weekend.

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Boston Calling: Summer Starts Tonight

May 23rd, 2014

Summer this year officially lasts from 6/21 to 9/21, but the summer season runs differently, bracketed by two fantastic Boston Calling festivals—over Memorial Day weekend and the weekend after Labor Day. This Saturday and Sunday are already sold out, but the good news is that this year Boston Calling packs in even more music and kicks off a night earlier, with a full-on folk attack beginning tonight at 6 p.m. with Jack Johnson, Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros and Cass McCombs.

And as things begin winding down at beaches across the land, Boston Calling returns with another fantastic three days and nights of nonstop music in early September: the National, Neutral Milk Hotel and Future Islands on 9/5, Lorde, Childish Gambino, Girl Talk, Volcano Choir, the Hold Steady, Bleachers, Skey Ferreira, S. Carey and Clifflight on 9/6, and Nas, the Roots, the Replacements, Spoon, the 1975, Twenty One Pilots, Lake Street Dive, the War on Drugs, White Denim, San Fermin and Gentlemen Hall on 9/7.

(Take a look at last year’s inaugural Boston Calling, above.)

 

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Infamous Stringdusters Celebrate New Album at The Bowery Ballroom

March 25th, 2014

The Infamous Stringdusters, those noted purveyors of groove-friendly bluegrass, formed in Nashville in 2006. According to PopMatters, they “take traditional bluegrass and old-timey music and use it as a launching pad to explore other, more improvisational, free-flowing forms.” And while the band’s lineup hasn’t been exactly free flowing, there have been a few personnel changes over the ensuing years: Guitarist Andy Falco joined when Chris Eldridge departed to join Punch Brothers, and several years later, the man on the mandolin, Jesse Cobb, left the band. But Travis Book (upright bass), Jeremy Garrett (Fiddle), Andy Hall (dobro) and Chris Pandolfi (banjo) have all been around since the start. And together, they’ve put out five albums (one of them a live LP), the last of which, Silver Sky (stream it below), came out in 2012. But their newest full-length, the highly anticipated Let It Go, arrives next Tuesday. And the Infamous Stringdusters (above, performing “Let It Go” and, below, covering Lorde’s “Royals”) are already out on the road in support of it. Their tour brings them to New York City to play The Bowery Ballroom on Thursday night.

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Broods Just Might Be the Next Big Thing in New Zealand Music

March 4th, 2014

Broods – Mercury Lounge – March 3, 2014

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Last night at Mercury Lounge you could have run directly into the future with the New Zealand band Broods making their debut New York City appearance. Two of the vice presidents for alternative and Top 40 radio promotion from Capitol Music Group stood in the back, almost unavoidable if also hidden in plain sight. Representing the two pathways forward for the band—alternative radio and heavy-rotation at Top 40—a Capitol signee at the close of last year, these two wizards of the radio dial likely control as much of the group’s future as a major commercial act as the duo themselves. It was hard to avoid this sense of becoming from a group that by virtue of sharing producer Joel Little, Oceania and a digital snare drum, recall something of the mercurial, stupefying success of Lorde.

R&B aesthetics in alternative circles may well be a bubble, but Capitol has already doubled down on brother-sister-act Broods. Although for the 200 new converts packing the room, theirs was a different sort of business, a chance to buy low on—to buy intimacy from—a band seemingly about to head for your radio dial and living room. This was like listening to Chvrches in Glasgow two years ago or Lorde in Brooklyn last spring. Everyone arrived chasing some form of the future. Broods opened with “Never Gonna Change,” Georgia Nott’s vocals oozing fecundity if not outright sex, a mixture of footnotes from Dido to Imogen Heap. The sound registered somewhere between the aforementioned Ella Yelich-O’Connor and James Blake—slow-dance music for kids who hate to slow dance. Broods moved through “Pretty Thing” and “Sleep Baby Sleep,” the first owing much to Moby’s Play, the second featuring stirring vocals that would easily be at home on No Angel.

The closing movement of the set, a pithy eight songs, was highlighted by “Taking You There” (think: Avicii’s “Wake Me Up filled up with cold medicine), “Coattails,” another Dido-indebted jam, and “Bridges,” the song that earned the Capitol Records signing. “Coattails” featured the lyric of the evening, “a hit between the eyes,” before the whirring downbeat engaged, one of those literal and figurative direct hits that lays the foundation for buildings like Capitol’s 5th Avenue headquarters. Despite only one more day in America, Nott said they loved it here and would return. The feeling proved mutual, this much was obvious. Nott and the audience were both right, the set closed with a quiet new number, the future lying inside for a moment before it moved out there to Houston Street and into the American commercial night. —Geoff Nelson

 

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A Young Talent on the Rise

October 1st, 2013

Lorde – Webster Hall – September 30, 2013


It is no surprise that Lorde drew a sold-out crowd to Webster Hall on a Monday night. The audacious young singer-songwriter from New Zealand has already made an undeniably strong impression on the music scene. The audience waited patiently as Pete Lawrie Winfield, the man behind the moniker Until the Ribbon Breaks, stepped out first to deliver a striking set. A haunting, bass-heavy rendition of “Pressure,” anchored the performance. Audience members who weren’t familiar with Until the Ribbon Breaks likely left the venue last night eager to listen to more of Winfield’s material.

By the time Lorde took the stage, Webster Hall was filled to capacity with fans of all ages. Ella Yelich-O’Connor, 16, has attracted a diverse array of fans. This is unsurprising, given that her music is defiant, infectious and, above all, smart. Yelich-O’Connor’s backlit figure commanded the stage flanked by a drummer and a keyboardist. Her voice is a bit rougher around the edges in a live setting, which suits her music very well. She kicked off her hour-long set with a deliciously subdued version of “Bravado.”

“Thanks for coming, I really appreciate it,” coyly said the singer before launching into “Tennis Court” and “Buzzcut Season.” A dark and rapturous cover of Kanye West’s “Hold My Liquor” had the crowd leaping. “Royals” gave everyone in the packed venue the opportunity to sing along, as the single had been most people’s first taste of her music. The end of Lorde’s set had a decidedly somber tone as she explored the lyrics of “400 Lux” and “The World Alone.” Lorde delivered her set with astounding conviction and compelling confidence. And we can only hope her talent gets better with age. —Schuyler Rooth

Photos courtesy of Gregg Greenwood | gregggreenwood.com