Tag Archives: Mumford & Sons

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Bear’s Den Headline The Bowery Ballroom Tomorrow Night

July 30th, 2014

Thanks to their modern take on throwback folk—and their use of a banjo—Bear’s Den have garnered comparisons to Mumford & Sons and the Avett Brothers. And although they’ve only released a few singles and EPs, hitting the road in support of bands like Of Monsters and Men and Daughter, has already earned the young London three-piece—Andrew Davie (vocals and guitar), Joey Haynes (banjo and guitar) and Kev Jones (drums and Communion cofounder with Ben Lovett)—a growing reputation as a band not to miss. Following on the heels of last year’s Agape (stream it below), Bear’s Den (above, doing “Don’t Let the Sun Steal You Away” for Sideshow Alley TV) put out a second EP, Without/Within (stream it below), earlier this year. “The songs were in many ways our most personal yet and also our most ambitious sonically,” Davies told Rolling Stone. A proper full-length is due later this year, but on the heels of playing the esteemed Newport Folk Fest this past weekend, Bear’s Den headline The Bowery Ballroom tomorrow nightLittle Racer, a local four-piece, open the show

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Mumford & Sons Revitalize Forest Hills Stadium

August 29th, 2013

Mumford & Sons – Forest Hills Stadium – August 28, 2013


Clouds sat heavily over Forest Hills Stadium last night as thousands of concertgoers filled the seats and standing room of the historic venue to see Mumford & Sonsthe Vaccines and Bear’s Den for the venue’s first concert since 1997. We couldn’t have cared less about the raindrops falling throughout the night, as this inaugural show since the stadium’s reopening was going down in music history. Excitedly, the crowd settled in for lively sets from Bear’s Den and the Vaccines. “I can’t tell you how excited we are to be here,” said Vaccines frontman Justin Young, beaming between songs. Highlights from their set included “Blow It Up,” “Wetsuit,” “All in White” and “I Always Knew.”

As night fell, the crowd jockeyed for the best possible stage view. It seemed as if not a single seat or patch of standing room was empty. Fog filled the stage and the lights dimmed as we heard Mumford & Sons tuning in the dark. Uproarious applause and cheering ensued as the lights came up on the band playing “Lovers’ Eyes,” followed by “Babel.” Marcus Mumford greeted the sold-out stadium: “We just can’t believe you all came—17,000 people on a tennis court? That hasn’t happened for a long time!” The set moved along swiftly, and additional string and brass instruments joined the mix to create an orchestral vibrancy that escalated Mumford & Sons’ anthemic music.

“We’re going to play a song that’s extremely inappropriate considering the humidity,” said Mumford with a chuckle before the band played “Winter Winds.” The foggy low light suited the band well during their subdued numbers, and gleaming spotlights electrified the up-tempo moments. “Timshel,” “Little Lion Man” and “Hopeless Wanderer” had the crowd singing along, entranced. For their encore, the band covered Bruce Springsteen’s “I’m on Fire,” which had many singing along. Mumford & Sons took a break between songs to hit some tennis balls into the crowd using their instruments as tennis racquets. Paying tribute to their initial success, the band played closed the show with “The Cave” and bid the audience a cheerful adieu, cheering on the team that worked so hard to restore the stadium. Judging by the success of last night’s show, Forest Hills Stadium will be home to more sold-out shows in the years to come and reclaim its reputation as a famed music venue. —Schuyler Rooth

Photos courtesy of Diana Wong | dianawongphoto.com

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Treetop Flyers Celebrate Album Release Tomorrow at Mercury Lounge

June 25th, 2013

Friends Reid Morrison (vocals and guitar), Sam Beer (guitar and vocals), Tomer Danan (drums and vocals), Laurie Sherman (guitar) and Matthew Starritt (bass and vocals) were playing in different London bands—although Danan is the lone American among them—when they teamed up to form the folkie, Americana-tinged Treetop Flyers in 2009. That they play cool, roots-y music should come as no surprise considering Morrison cites My Morning Jacket, Jonathan Wilson and Matthew E. White as influences. As a live band, Treetop Flyers (above, playing “Things Will Change” for FaceCulture) burst onto the scene by winning the Glastonbury Emerging Talent Competition in 2011, putting them on the venerable festival’s main stage and setting them up to open for bands like the Lumineers. As for their recorded material, they put out a few singles and an EP on Communion Records (co-owned by Mumford & Sons’ Ben Lovett) before switching over to Brooklyn’s Partisan Records for debut full-length, The Mountain Moves (stream it below), out today. Join in on the celebration when they celebrate its release tomorrow at Mercury Lounge.

 

 

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Sixth Season of Venerable Live-Music Show on PBS Begins Soon

June 19th, 2013

This July, the sixth season of one of the best live-music shows, Live from the Artists Den, premieres on public television across the land, kicking off with Mumford & Sons, winners of this year’s Grammy for Album of the Year. From there, some more of our favorite bands, including Soundgarden—with their first-ever televised concert—the Killers, Ed Sheeran and the National round out the season’s impressive lineup, with each show filmed live in a different, nontraditional setting in the U.S. The season will air in the New York City area on Saturdays at 11 p.m., beginning 7/6, on WLIW21 (and late-night Saturdays/early Sundays at midnight, beginning 7/7, on THIRTEEN, plus Sundays at 10 p.m., beginning 7/7, on NJTV). For other cities, check your local listings here.

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Don’t Miss Little Green Cars Tonight at Music Hall (Seriously)

March 26th, 2013

They’re barely out of their teens, but the five members of Dublin’s Little Green Cars—Stevie Appleby (vocals and guitar), Faye O’Rourke (vocals and guitar), Dylan Lynch (drums and vocals), Adam O’Regan (guitar and vocals) and Donagh Seaver O’Leary (bass and vocals)—have already been making music together for five years, a lively brand of folk-tinged rock filled with five-part harmonies and stirring melodies. But it’s an urban brand of roots rock, according to The Guardian, “more Brooklyn than Nashville or Texas.” Their debut album, Absolute Zero, arrives this summer on Glassnote, home to Mumford & Sons, Phoenix and Two Door Cinema Club. But you don’t need to wait that long to hear some of their new tunes because Little Green Cars (above, doing a soaring a cappella version of “Red” for The Bowery Presents Live) play Music Hall of Williamsburg tonight.

(Watch an interview with Little Green Cars and see them perform “The Consequences of Not Sleeping” exclusively for The Bowery Presents Live.)

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Mumford & Sons Soar in Brooklyn

February 13th, 2013

Mumford & Sons – Barclays Center – February 12, 2013

(Photo: Joe Papeo)

Mumford & Sons began to break in the United States with a run of shows during the 2009 CMJ Music Marathon, including a memorably half-full show at Music Hall of Williamsburg. How little we all knew then. A few months later they appeared on our TVs at the Grammy Awards. Last night, in their second grand return to the borough in as many weeks, this time on the heels of their Grammy win for Album of the Year, the four-piece Mumford & Sons, the band that launched a thousand banjos, took the stage at a sold-out Barclays Center. As the curtain whipped away, the band launched into “Babel,” a song that bears at least nominal reference to the moment in Biblical history when man was unified and spoke a common language.

And it was in this temple of unity, the Barclays Center, the big tent of eminent domain and gentrification, microbrewed beers, suspenders and beards, that Mumford opened with a string of songs off their recent Grammy-winning album, Babel. After the band soared through the album’s title track, they moved on to “I Will Wait,” “Winter Winds,” a first-album favorite, and “Below My Feet.” It was equal parts elegy and ebullience as the general-admission floor alternated between silence and carbonated bouncing, and the sections near the rafters produced reverence and reverie. This, of course, marked the brilliance and mainstream appeal of Mumford: to package the unremembered kitsch and nostalgia of folk melodies with explosive, life-affirming moments of musical elevation. The quartet then switched between the collective, quiet appeal of “Timshel” and the unstoppable, “Little Lion Man,” which first launched this band into the hearts and minds of many of these assembled thousands.

The middle of the set was highlighted by “Lover of the Light,” which sounds a great deal like a sustainably raised, NPR-listening Dave Matthews Band song in its latter half, and comprised both elements of the somber and the celebratory—its final banjo line and lyrics transformed into the screaming marching orders. The main set closed with “Whispers in the Dark” and “Dust Bowl Dance,” the former a song with which the band closed their 2009 Music Hall performance. It was then unrecorded: “Something from the next album,” they said that night. But last night, things were in sharper focus, the benefit of time and perspective. “Whispers” was the second track off a hit album, its edict of “live while we’re young” repeated and screamed back from a basketball arena of adoring fans. It was about unity to be sure, a moment of mass collective experience before the band receded into the darkness of stage left and the empire built on a tower of four-part harmonies and emotive evocation. It wasn’t a night about prayer, a common complaint about the band, but it was about rebuilding the temple and speaking in one voice. —Geoff Nelson

Photo courtesy of Joe Papeo | www.irocktheshot.com

Congratulations to the Winners

February 11th, 2013

The Bowery Presents extends warm congratulations to every 2013 Grammy winner (and nominee). And if you take a look at those who took home awards, it’s like a who’s who list of acts that have recently played our venues, including:

the Black Keys: Best Rock Performance, Best Rock Song, Best Rock Album
Gotye: Record of the Year (featuring Kimbra), Best Pop Duo/Group Performance (featuring Kimbra), Best Alternative Music Album
fun.: Song of the Year (featuring Janelle Monáe), Best New Artist
Skrillex (featuring Sirah): Best Dance Recording, Best Dance/Electronica Album
Frank Ocean: Best Urban Contemporary Album, Best Rap/Sung Collaboration (Kanye West and Jay-Z featuring Frank Ocean and the-Dream)
Mumford & Sons
: Album of the Year
Adele: Best Solo Pop Performance
Bonnie Raitt: Best Americana Album
Dan Auerbach: Producer of the Year, Non-Classical
Miguel: Best R&B Song
Kelly Clarkson: Best Pop Vocal Album
the Civil Wars (and Taylor Swift): Best Song Written for Visual Media
Halestorm: Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance

 

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The Sky Is the Limit

December 17th, 2012

Haim – Music Hall of Williamsburg – December 15, 2012


“This is the best birthday I will ever have in my life,” Alana Haim told Saturday’s sold-out Music Hall of Williamsburg crowd. It was her 21st, and she still hadn’t had her first legal drink. Along with playing guitar and keys, she’s the baby of Haim. “I don’t think I could breathe without everyone on this stage,” she later revealed. “Everyone on this stage” included oldest sister Este (bass and vocals) and middle sister Danielle (lead guitar and vocals). And with drummer Dash Hutton, they played the best show I’ve seen all year.

Haim’s destiny seems almost preordained. Their parents (known as “Mama and Papa Haim” by the sisters) were both musicians—Mama played acoustic guitar and sang while Papa was a drummer. For 10 years, the Haim sisters played in a cover band, Rockinhaim, with their parents. This experience proved integral to their development as accomplished musicians in their own right. (Este studied Brazilian music and percussion at UCLA, and Danielle has toured with Jenny Lewis and Julian Casablancas.) And it brought them all so close together that, to this day, Haim still bring Mama and Papa on tour with them.

This grounding influence readily appears onstage in a couple of ways. First, they’re incredibly comfortable under the lights. Este, Danielle and Alana are witty, charming and hilarious, and they banter like friends entertaining guests. Second, their live show absolutely rocks. Their two outstanding EPs display a penchant for electro pop, and live, they seamlessly blend classic rock, ’80s pop, country and rockabilly. They’ve opened for such diverse acts as Mumford & Sons, Florence and the Machine and No Age. Danielle especially impresses on vocals and guitar. She channels her inner Melissa Etheridge and shreds on her Gibson SG, the iconic axe used by legendary lead guitar players like Angus Young and Derek Trucks. Although stylistically, she sounds more like David Gilmour, picking and choosing each note with deliberate care.

But in the end, it was Alana’s night. And before they played what happened to be their first ever encore, Mama handed Alana a cupcake lit by a leftover menorah candle, and the family led the crowd in a verse of “Happy Birthday.” “It’s officially Alanukah!” announced Mama. Alana closed her eyes for a few seconds to conjure a wish. And after she blew out the candles, the band became Rockinhaim, playing a stunning rendition of “Mustang Sally,” with Mama impressing on lead vocals and Papa banging a heavily funky beat. Though we’ll never know what it was, Alana’s wish will almost certainly comes true: For this band, the sky is the limit. —Alex Kapelman

 

Little Green Cars Are Ireland’s Next Big Thing

November 6th, 2012

They’re each just 20 years old, but the five members of Dublin’s Little Green Cars have already been making music together for five years, a brand of folk-tinged rock filled with layered harmonies and stirring melodies. But it’s an urban brand of roots rock, according to The Guardian, “more Brooklyn than Nashville or Texas.” Watch their acoustic version of “The Consequences of Not Sleeping” done exclusively for The Bowery Presents Live channel on YouTube. Their debut album will arrive in early 2013 via Glassnote, the label that brought us Mumford & Sons, Two Door Cinema Club and the Temper Trap.

In an interview, also filmed at the Tibet House, Stevie Appleby and Faye O’Rourke reminisce about the band’s beginnings, their childhood influences and why writing happy music is a challenge. Watch the interview: http://tbp.im/VP1Bnt. And subscribe to The Bowery Presents Live to watch more performances and interviews like these, and the latest info on our upcoming live-streaming shows.

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Don’t Miss Dry the River Tomorrow Night at The Bowery Ballroom

September 19th, 2012

Peter Liddle (guitar and vocals) originally started Dry the River as a solo project. But wanting a bigger sound, he invited Will Harvey (violin and keys), Scott Miller (bass and vocals), Matt Taylor (guitar and vocals) and Jon Warren (drums and percussion) to join him in making what he calls “folkie gospel music played by a post-punk band.” Appearances at Glastonbury and SXSW last year earned Dry the River (above, doing “Bible Belt” on a boat in an Amsterdam canal for Face Culture) comparisons to Fleet Foxes and Mumford & Sons. And following the release of their debut LP, Shallow Bed, this past spring, the English five-piece has hit the road. See them, alongside Houndmouth and Yellowbirds, tomorrow night at The Bowery Ballroom.

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Alt-J Are Worthy of the Buzz

September 13th, 2012

Alt-J – The Bowery Ballroom – September 12, 2012


There was a certain geometric incoherence in play as hotly buzzed UK band Alt-J took the stage at a very sold-out Bowery Ballroom last night. Everyone was jammed together in this glorified square to see a band that insisted they were a triangle. See, Alt-J contend their name is more than a collection of letters, instead representing the outcome of a keyboard command, the combination of “Alt” and “J,” which on a Mac makes the shape of a triangle, making their very name an unspeakable symbolic iconography. Every face in the audience pointed toward four faces onstage offering seemingly infinite possibilities. This would all seem overwrought, if it weren’t for the uncommon quality of the band’s debut, An Awesome Wave, and their bizarre and brilliant live show. Somehow helpless against their insistence on three-way vanishing points—or how affected and silly this would seem in less capable hands—the audience and the band intersected over and over, creating a cohesive, if pleasantly limited, little world inside these invented boundaries.

The band opened with “(Interlude 1),” with a choir joining them to offer the band’s Baroque-ish two-part harmonies a chilling and elegiac varnish. One part Mumford & Sons and one part the xx, Alt-J slid between slow-drive, sexy arrangements and these warm duets between guitarist Joe Newman and keys player Gus Unger-Hamilton. “Something Good” and “Dissolve Me,” mid-album and middle-set songs expanded this notion of austere vocals and ebullient keyboard-driven arrangements, accented brightly with tactile guitar picking and high-fret work. The band played their best song, “Breezeblocks,” near the end, the track’s punching vocals and guitars ringing through the balconies as the audience shuffled around chanting lines like “Do you know where the wild things go?” The song’s conclusion, a collision of the lyrics “Please don’t go, I love you so” and “I’d eat you whole,” an awesome and approachable angle to a band that values its weirdness as much as its beautiful arrangements.

“This is the last song on the album,” Unger-Hamilton mumbled over the din as Alt-J returned to play “Taro” as the encore. At least one person in the crowd made the reference that is as controversial as it is possibly correct: “Radiohead.” This is a bit of branding too loaded even for a band currently touring with a gigantic neon triangle as their backdrop. However, there was something undeniable happening here. Alt-J finished the haunting last chords of “Taro” and held up a slightly altered version of the “diamonds in the sky,” triangle-ish hand sign that Jay-Z and Kanye West initiated with a straight face in 2005. The crowd returned it in kind having fully embraced this iconography of two lines and three points. The audience and the band made two of these three, one of the year’s best albums brought to the stage made the third at The Bowery Ballroom, a tidy and discrete geometric universe, a triangle inside a square. —Geoff Nelson

 

 

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Mumford & Sons Keep Getting Bigger

August 2nd, 2012

Mumford & Sons – Pier A Park – August 1, 2012


During the CMJ Music Marathon in October 2009, Mumford & Sons played Mercury Lounge and Music Hall of Williamsburg. It was still almost four months before their smash debut LP, Sigh No More, came out here, but the crowd already knew most of the words. And then as the album was ringing up accolades and awards a year after its U.S. release, the London four-piece lit up the Grammys with a lively performance of “The Cave” and an absolutely rollicking version of “Maggie’s Farm” alongside Dylan and the Avett Brothers.

From there, Mumford & Sons became road warriors and their popularity bloomed as they worked their way up to big stages at big festivals like Bonnaroo, Coachella and Glastonbury. Along the way, they fleshed out and road-tested new material, which will come in the form of Babel in late September. With that comes a new tour, and while Mumford & Sons got their start playing the kind of instruments and music that are often heard while gathered round a fire, last night at Pier A Park in Hoboken, they did so for thousands assembled along the banks of the Hudson River.

As the remains of a lovely sunset lingered in front of the stage and the lights of Manhattan twinkled behind it, Mumford & Sons launched into “Lover’s Eyes,” a new one, and the crowd exulted. “We’re very happy to be playing our first ever gig in New Jersey,” said frontman Marcus Mumford. It was also the band’s first show of the tour, and they didn’t shy away from the new songs—playing “I Will Wait,” “Lover of the Light,” “Whispers in the Dark” and “Ghosts That We Knew” in addition to the opener—which sounded different than the first album’s tunes: bigger, more electrified and amplified (and a lot more drums).

Their previous time through, Mumford & Sons played Terminal 5, but last night they had no trouble riling up the big crowd in the large grassy venue with their increasingly bigger sound. Witness the scattered groups of people, arms aloft, jumping up and down together, lustily singing along to the likes of “Little Lion Man,” “Roll Away Your Stone” and “Dust Bowl Dance” at a volume usually reserved for alone time in the shower or a car. Mumford & Sons do things in a big way; so a four-song encore followed their set: “Winter Winds” on the heels of a horn-section instrumental “New York, New York,” fittingly on Sinatra Avenue in Hoboken. And then after Mumford professed his love for America and remarked on having come “a long way from the Mercury Lounge,” they closed with a terrific version of Simon and Garfunkel’s “The Boxer” and “The Cave.” But, of course, it couldn’t end like that. We needed something bigger, and then fireworks, launched from the Hudson, lit up the sky. —R. Zizmor

Photos courtesy of Joe Papeo | www.irocktheshot.com

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Communion Comes to New York City

March 30th, 2012

Communion: Austin to Boston Tour – Mercury Lounge – March 29, 2012


Communion’s name has risen to prominence in recent months due in part to the involvement of Ben Lovett from Mumford & Sons, but mostly because of the English label’s consistently stellar folk-singer-songwriter (and everything in between) lineups and releases. And last night its Austin to Boston tour, featuring Bear’s Den, Nathaniel Rateliff, the Staves and Ben Howard, came to Mercury Lounge. Something I love (and have always loved, since Communion’s London club nights way back) is the fact that you can arrive at an event knowing none of the acts and leave a fan of all of them.

Bear’s Den, featuring longtime London favorite frontman Andrew Davie, started off the night. Davie’s beautiful, unique voice mixed with earnest lyrics made for a perfect beginning. And songs like “Stubborn Beast” and “Pompeii” are sure to be floating around blogosphere soon. Next, Rateliff, a solo performer with a great sense of melody and melancholy, seemed somewhat darker but equally as beautiful.

After Rateliff the Staves, an all-female harmonizing trio with a killer sense of humor, told the audience they had used Midnight Cowboy’s “Hey, I’m walkin’ here” line at least once that day. And then Ben Howard closed the show with his beautiful brand of upbeat British folk. Communion may only recently be receiving attention Stateside but the label’s been chugging along quietly in the UK, building up a fantastic roster of talent and, thankfully, they’re ready to share it with us now. —Lauren Glucksman

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Mumford & Sons – Terminal 5 – November 15, 2010

November 16th, 2010

Mumford & Sons - Terminal 5 - November 15, 2010

Photos courtesy of Greg Notch | notch.org

(Tonight’s Mumford & Sons show is sold out.)

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Grow a Pair: Win Free Tickets to See Mumford & Sons on 11/15

November 11th, 2010

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Next week Mumford & Sons play two sold-out shows at Terminal 5. But it’s not all bad news because The House List is giving away two tickets to the English quartet’s Monday show. Want to Grow a Pair? Then fill out the form below, listing your full name, e-mail address, which show you’re trying to win tickets to (Mumford & Sons, 11/15) and a brief message explaining why Monday is the best night to go out. Eddie Bruiser, who likes to go out on any night that ends in day, will notify the winner by Monday. Good luck.

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