Tag Archives: Music

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Aquilo Bring Acclaimed New Music to The Bowery Ballroom Monday

March 17th, 2017

Four years ago, in northwest England, Ben Fletcher and Tom Higham teamed up to make atmospheric, melancholy down-tempo electronic pop songs about heartbreak, loss and regret as the band Aquilo. After releasing a series of singles and EPs, the duo’s first studio full-length, Silhouettes (stream it below), arrived this past January. “It’s a work of art sewn together with a mesmerizing voice, a vocal that stops you in your tracks and forces you to listen,” according to Clash. “Crafted to perfection, Silhouettes is outstanding in its audible beauty.” And after a couple of American shows in Los Angeles and at SXSW, Aquilo (above, performing “Sorry”) play The Bowery Ballroom on Monday night.

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Green Day/Against Me! – Barclays Center – March 15, 2017

March 16th, 2017

Green Day/Against Me! - Barclays Center - March 15, 2017

Photos courtesy of Joe Papeo | www.irocktheshot.com

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Spend Saturday Night with Ezra Furman at Rough Trade NYC

March 15th, 2017

Regardless of whether Chicago singer-songwriter Ezra Furman (above, doing “Teddy I’m Ready” live in studio for KEXP FM) is fronting a band or doing solo work, his calling card has become unpretentious music that’s raw and sentimental and what the Guardian calls “lyrics that burst out like water through an opened dam.” His most recent solo release, Big Fugitive Life (stream it below), came out last year. Clash called it “an enthralling EP that contains some of his finest work to date.” And “Ezra Furman maintains his perpetual motion,” added the Line of Best Fit. “The lyrics are endlessly quotable throughout.” Catch the free-spirited performer on Saturday night at Rough Trade NYC. Brooklyn garage-post-wave-psych band Monograms open the show.

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Grow a Pair: Win Free Tickets to See Jens Lekman on 3/18

March 14th, 2017

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Jens Lekman is known across the world for keen pop hooks and a witty sense of humor. With a new album out, Life Will See You Now, the Swedish singer-songwriter has been back on our shores traveling the country, and his tour closes with three shows in NYC. A few tickets still remain for next Monday’s solo show at Rough Trade NYC, but his appearances at The Bowery Ballroom on Saturday and at Music Hall of Williamsburg on Sunday are already sold out. That’s the bad news. However, the good news is that The House List is giving away two tickets to see Jens Lekman on Saturday at The Bowery Ballroom. Want to get in on the fun but got shut out of tickets? Try to Grow a Pair of them. Just fill out the form below, making sure to include your full name, e-mail address, which show you’re trying to win tickets to (Jens Lekman, 3/18) and your favorite thing about Swedish music. Eddie Bruiser, a fan of Scandinavian rock, will notify the winner by Friday. Lycka till.

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The Staves Build Bridges at Music Hall of Williamsburg on Friday

March 13th, 2017

The Staves – Music Hall of Williamsburg – March 10, 2017

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As youngsters in England, Emily, Jessica and Camilla Staveley-Taylor learned guitar from their father and sang heavy folk melodies at the local pub, which has bloomed into something bigger. Their sweet sisterly harmonies have earned the Staves opening slots for the Civil Wars, Bon Iver and Florence and the Machine. The siblings formed such a strong friendship with Justin Vernon that the Bon Iver frontman produced their last album, If I Was. Playing at Music Hall of Williamsburg Friday night, the first of two sold-out weekend shows in Brooklyn, the sisters were a lovely respite after the morning’s snowfall. Don Henley’s “The Boys of Summer” introduced the ladies—and drummer Dave Power—to the stage. The show began with Camilla on ukulele for “Blood I Bled,” while Jessica, on guitar, and Emily, behind keys, offered backing vocals.

Opener Mikaela Davis added harp on the breakup song “No Me, No You, No More” as Jessica’s elfin vocals rang across the room. Midway through the set, when Emily and Camilla needed to swap stage positions, Jessica stalled with some light conversation about Gilmore Girls, which the band had been watching on the bus. This sent the crowd into a tizzy with shouts of “Team Jess,” but it was the sisters’ critical takes on the character Rory as “a nause” (an English term of annoyance) that elicited cheers. Vernon’s influences were obvious once everyone was in the right place and Camilla created an echo chamber with a series of vocal loops on “Train Tracks,” similar to those on Bon Iver songs. The skip-hop cadence of “Black & White” perked up fans and grew for the anthemic “Tired as Fuck” as crowd members clapped along to Camilla’s languid delivery. An encore was inevitable and Davis returned again for a dreaming acoustic cover of Sufjan Steven’s “Chicago.” Jessica prefaced the final song, “Mexico,” with “Don’t build walls, let’s build bridges.” —Sharlene Chiu

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All Them Witches – The Bowery Ballroom – March 10, 2017

March 13th, 2017

All Them Witches - The Bowery Ballroom - March 10, 2017

Photos courtesy of Silvia Saponaro | www.saponarophotography.com

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The Flaming Lips – Terminal 5 – March 9, 2017

March 10th, 2017

The Flaming Lips - Terminal 5 - March 9, 2017
(The Flaming Lips play the Westburty Theater tomorrow night.)


Photos courtesy of Dana (distortion) Yavin | distortionpix.com

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The Radio Dept. Make It Seem Effortless at The Bowery Ballroom

March 9th, 2017

The Radio Dept. – The Bowery Ballroom – March 8, 2017

The Radio Dept. – The Bowery Ballroom – March 8, 2017
The Radio Dept. speak the wispy language of dream pop, straddling the spaces between badass and poignant, in the middle of My Bloody Valentine jacked up on something and Stereolab with highlights of ’80s-synth sentimentality à la Pet Shop Boys. There’s no question the band’s influences are long and distinguished, it’s just that because of the inflection and swerve, you only hear them. Last night the benevolent Swedes graced The Bowery Ballroom with a methodically expert set. Select songs from their catalog of rock electronica dating back to 2001 were played as an almost continuous DJ set come to life. Their return to New York City promised a devoted turnout, and the room was filled with fans spanning from old faithful to newly enchanted.

“Sloboda Narodu,” the glorious tribal synth anthem from last year’s Running out of Love, opened the proceedings, immediately putting the crowd in the palm of the band’s hands, which were steady as a surgeon’s. A self-assuredness propelled the performance, with members handling their contribution to each song like a tactician whose measures are second nature. This amounted to a natural flow, with attendees instinctually following along. More than anything, the Radio Dept. just wanted to jam—that much was evident. They’ve never been afraid to embellish in flowing blankets of up-tempo, electronically contoured instrumentation. This holds true onstage, and as they leaned into every groove, the Radio Dept. made it seem effortless.

Sometimes frontman Johan Duncanson sounded like Euro contemporary Markus Acher of the Notwist. The messages of political awareness were there yet felt like they were absorbed subliminally, in hushed expression that blended into the nebulous formations of sound. You’re reminded of the import of content amidst the spell they cast when Duncanson momentarily mentioned, “This next one is called ‘Death to Fascism.’” The Radio Dept. quite simply have a knack for pushing out immaculate, steady and uninterrupted rhythms whether on record or onstage. And last night’s winding journey through more than 15 years of vibrant, animated music was a gratifying retrospective. —Charles Steinberg | @Challyolly

Photos courtesy of Charles Steinberg | charlesosteinberg.com

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Jesca Hoop Proves to Be a True Original at Mercury Lounge

March 9th, 2017

Jesca Hoop – Mercury Lounge – March 8, 2017

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Jesca Hoop was once a nanny to Tom Waits’ kids, and she’s worked with everyone from Blake Mills and Stewart Copeland to Sam Beam, with whom the singer-songwriter released a gorgeous duets album in 2016 and subsequently toured. Hoop has signed to Sub Pop, and she’s a touch mystical—a vocalist and soothsayer from some faraway, possibly not terrestrial place—but she can tell a bar joke with the best of ’em. She’s accessible and impenetrable at the same time. An artist like that, you’d think, would be someone more written about than listened to, but listening to Hoop’s music is only the beginning of the larger embrace. Live, she’s quietly (and sometimes not so quietly) devastating. She formed a deep and detailed bond with an audience over the course of a 75-minute set at Mercury Lounge last night, framed by the recently released Memories Are Now, a collection of new Hoop songs that reveal more with each subsequent listen.

What do we call this? Hoop arrived as part of a four-piece band that included drums, bass, harmony vocals and other effects. Her music could sound trance-folkie, as in the opening one-two of “Songs of Old” and “Animal Kingdom Chaotic.” It could sound bittersweet and kind of country, as in “Peacemaker.” It could creep up and then, well, overcome you, as in “The Coming,” which thanks to some spectral-sounding guitar in its intro sounded distant and then was upon you. It’s cinematic—panoramic even—as Hoop created little worlds out of lyrics. “I refuse to think that my best friend’s going to hell anymore” is what might be called a classic Jesca Hoop line. So is “And now you gotta get it with what you’ve got/ With what you’ve been given or not” (from the late-in-set standout “Born To”). And so is “You say it’s impossible/ But your dumb computer says no.”

Hoop’s an artist in whom you can hear what you want to in her forbearers and potential influences. The mind drifts to Laurie Anderson, Kate Bush, Björk and plenty of others. When the mind settles, however—and you can really pause to hear and absorb the nuances when in the thrall of Hoop and band in the live setting—you feel like you’re hearing a true original. No one else quite sounds like this, and you’re thirsting for more when an unhurried set still goes by like a finger snap. —Chad Berndtson | @Cberndtson

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Arcade Fire’s Tim Kingsbury Brings His Sam Patch Project to NYC

March 8th, 2017

Following Arcade Fire’s world tour in support of their fourth studio album, Reflektor, Tim Kingsbury—the band’s guitarist and bassist—launched a side project called Sam Patch. Inspired by the likes of Fleetwood Mac, Leonard Cohen and ABBA, Kingsbury released the debut Sam Patch album, Yeah You, and I (stream it below), last month. It’s “a winning, engaging solo project full of analog synths and killer hooks,” according to PopMatters. “The songs have an innocent directness that’s welcoming and refreshing.” Kingsbury recently launched a short North American tour in support of the new tunes, which brings Sam Patch (above, the album’s second single “Listening”) to Mercury Lounge on Friday night. New York City singer-songwriter Miles Francis opens the show.

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Montreal Trio Heat Bring New Music to Mercury Lounge Tomorrow

March 8th, 2017

After doing time in other bands, Susil Sharma (vocals, guitar and synths) recorded the noisy, melodic demos that would become the original basis for the Montreal rock trio Heat, eventually joined by Matthew Fiorentino (guitar and synths) and Raphaël Bussières (bass). Their debut EP, Rooms (stream it below), arrived in 2014 and was rereleased the following year, earning the band comparisons to Pavement and the Jesus and Mary Chain. Taking a sonic leap forward, Heat (above, a video for “Lush”) returned with their debut full-length, Overnight (stream it below)—“heavy on melody and hooks, but with brash, shadowy undertones,” according to AllMusic—in January. And they play Mercury Lounge tomorrow night. NYC pop quintet Navy Gangs open the show.

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Grow a Pair: Win Free Tickets to See the Flaming Lips on 3/9

March 7th, 2017

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About three-and-half years since their last time through, the Flaming Lips return to play Terminal 5 this Thursday night. And just as with their previous visits, this show is also sold out. But not to worry because The House List is giving away two tickets. Don’t have any and want to go? Try to Grow a Pair. It’s easy. Just fill out the form below, making sure to include your full name, e-mail address, which show you’re trying to win tickets to (Flaming Lips, 3/9) and a brief message explaining your favorite song off Oczy Mlody. Eddie Bruiser, who’s just begun playing the album, will notify the winner by Thursday.

(The Flaming Lips also play the Westbury Theater on Saturday night.)

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Springtime Carnivore Plays the Early Show Tuesday at Mercury Lounge

March 6th, 2017

After the breakup of prior bands, singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Greta Morgan began artfully mixing psychedelia with sunny pop and folk rock as Springtime Carnivore a few years ago. A self-titled debut full-length (stream it below) came out in 2014. “This collection of warm, fuzzy indie pop, rock and psychedelic-tinged numbers represents a true new start for Morgan,” according to Paste. “The best of these songs transcend her previous work and hint toward new vistas that she’s clearly hoping to explore, and we’ll happily look in on her journey.” That journey continued with the 2016 release of Midnight Room (stream it below). The A.V. Club compared Springtime Carnivore (above, performing “Nude Polaroids” in studio for KEXP FM) to Neko Case & Her Boyfriends and Jenny Lewis and mentioned the album’s “beautiful, self-assured identity”—adding: “From the opening title track and its delicate blend of subdued synths, a brisk guitar rhythm and a lofty chorus, the record is emotionally adrift, wafting through comfortless heartbreak, warm nostalgia, and the alternative stargazing flourishes of fantasy and fatalistic wariness of delusion. The vehicle for all this is measured, glossy dream pop, polished with smooth, lush electronics and chilled with airy acoustic tones.” In mid-tour form, Springtime Carnivore plays Mercury Lounge tomorrow night. Terribly Yours open the show.

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Grandaddy Prove to Be Worth the Wait at Rough Trade NYC

March 3rd, 2017

Grandaddy – Rough Trade NYC – March 2, 2017

Grandaddy – Rough Trade NYC – March 2, 2017
There are albums that define an individual at a certain time of life, and for me it was Grandaddy’s The Sophtware Slump. I was a recent college graduate figuring out adulthood and working a “dream job” at my local radio station. Something about Jason Lytle’s specific lyrics laid across a series of bleeps and electronic haze struck a chord in me. I was first introduced to them when they opened for a then rising British band, Coldplay. That evening was highlighted by the special guest appearance by a barely recognizable Elliott Smith, whom Grandaddy had toured with prior. When the group disbanded back in 2006, there were morsels released in the form of a solo album by Lytle and side projects in Admiral Radley, but Grandaddy would not resurface until 2012 with a few local California gigs and select festivals in the UK. On the eve of their long-awaited fourth album, Last Place, the Golden State band played a sold-out Rough Trade NYC last night.

Opening their set with an abstract film filled with landscape juxtaposed with pixels, the quintet surfaced to the stage as if no time had passed. The crowd quickly got into it as Grandaddy opened with back-catalog gems “Hewlett’s Daughter” and “El Caminos in the West.” The evening would satisfy longtime fans, while introducing newer material like their first single from their latest, “Way We Won’t,” and follow-up single “Evermore.” The frontman was barraged with several requests midway through their set, but none of them were on the list. One fan graciously offered, “Your choice, Jason,” in which Lytle took the opportunity to segue into the spacey favorite “The Crystal Lake.”

The room erupted when the whimsical intro to “A.M. 180” signaled the audience to bop along to the melody, but it was near the end of the set that Lytle wrapped the night with an extra special bow. Going from new track “I Don’t Wanna Live Here Anymore” to the slow-burner “Jed’s Other Poem (Beautiful Ground),” he initiated the climax with a revved-up “Now It’s On.” Although the set concluded with harp-like keys on “He’s Simple, He’s Dumb, He’s the Pilot,” the enduring bandmates would return to encore with a pair, the new song “The Boat Is in the Barn” and oldie-but-goodie “Summer Here Kids.” Needless to say Grandaddy’s return was so worth the wait. Let’s hope there won’t be another decade-long hiatus. —Sharlene Chiu

Photos courtesy of Gregg Greenwood | gregggreenwood.com

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Dead Coast – Mercury Lounge – March 2, 2017

March 3rd, 2017

Dead Coast - Mercury Lounge - March 2, 2017

Photos courtesy of Silvia Saponaro | www.saponarophotography.com