Tag Archives: Photos

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The Sky Is the Limit for Larkin Poe

October 30th, 2014

Larkin Poe – Mercury Lounge – October 29, 2014

Larkin Poe – Mercury Lounge – October 29, 2014
When I saw Conor Oberst play Central Park’s SummerStage back in July, I loved his massive hodgepodge of a backing band, the majority of which was made up of opener Dawes, and there was a horn section. But most notably there were two women tearing it up on slide guitars and singing the Emmylou Harris parts during the Bright Eyes songs that night—and I knew I had to find out who they were.

It turns out they are the sisters who make up Larkin Poe, a country-tinged band from Atlanta that last night set Mercury Lounge ablaze with a pressure-cooked set of songs. Fresh off an appearance backing up Kristian Bush on the Today Show and not far removed from a tour opening as a duo for Elvis Costello (“We got to stay on his tour bus,” admitted older sister Megan Lovell excitedly), they looked and sounded ready to be doing their own thing again. “It feels so good to be back with the full band,” the younger Rebecca Lovell candidly told the crowd. The exposure and experiences the pair were able to rustle up in the last year or two must have been fun, but you could see they are now dead set on focusing that momentum on Larkin Poe.

That starts with their first full-length, Kin, released last week, an album full of sweet melodies juxtaposed with bluesy grit often materialized in the form of Rebecca’s straight guitar licks or Megan’s atmospheric slide-guitar playing. Larkin Poe played most of the album last night, and as good as those songs sound in headphones, they’re even more of a force to hear in person. And if Larkin Poe can find a way to use the sisters’ music-industry momentum to attract more ears, the sky’s the limit. —Sean O’Kane

Photos courtesy of Sean O’Kane | seanokanephoto.com

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SBTRKT Captivates Terminal 5

October 28th, 2014

SBTRKT – Terminal 5 – October 27, 2014

SBTRKT – Terminal 5 – October 27, 2014
Restrained energy perhaps best describes the music the captivated Terminal 5 crowd witnessed last night courtesy of SBTRKT. It was constructed much in the way a wave rolls into its crest, with deliberate forward motion and then unfurling, tumbling over itself as it cascades onto the shore. As if stepping out of a spacecraft wearing his trademark tribal mask, the phantom of electro-soul opera expressed his sonic salutation to the New York City earthlings, greeting them in a convivial British manner along with his strobed-out laser-splashed music from somewhere just outside the stratosphere.

What came across straight away was that SBTRKT commands his own instruments—
and consequently the crowd—deliberately building each movement of a neo-funk symphony through orchestration, elevating each piece to its climactic flourish, adding layer upon layer of percussion loops, further propelled by the accents of the drummer and keyboardist who accompanied him. Just after the first movement, SBRTKT gauged the audience’s temperature, checking to see if everyone was ready to be swept up in his momentous arrangements.

SBTRKT creates epic, soulful soundscapes that hearken back to ’90s R&B that he accentuates with jungle beats and dubstep, and he recruits a diverse assembly of crooners to emphasize his dynamic compositions in the process—a few of whom landed with him last night. This mixture of style and form is most comparable to his American contemporary, Flying Lotus, yet SBTRKT’s individuality is unmistakable, and he demonstrated with reserved confidence why his appeal is expanding. Dancing between his surrounding soundboards and keyboards while eluding the laser beams shooting from the stage behind him, SBTRKT put on a performance that left its intended mark, before jumping back into his spacecraft to look for the next destination and bring new life to the contemporary-music environment. —Charles Steinberg

Photos courtesy of Charles Steinberg

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Weezer – The Bowery Ballroom – October 27, 2014

October 28th, 2014

Weezer - The Bowery Ballroom - October 27, 2014

Photos courtesy of Dana (distortion) Yavin | distortionpix.com

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Angus & Julia Stone – Music Hall of Williamsburg – October 27, 2014

October 28th, 2014

Angus & Julia Stone - Music Hall of Williamsburg - October 27, 2014

Photos courtesy of Mike Benigno | mikebenigno.wordpress.com

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Thurston Moore Band – Rough Trade NYC – October 26, 2014

October 27th, 2014

Thurston Moore Band - Rough Trade NYC - October 26, 2014

Photos courtesy of Greg Pallante | gregpallante.com

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Shoegaze Pioneers Slowdive Reunited and Sounding Fresh

October 27th, 2014

Slowdive – Terminal 5 – October 25, 2014

Slowdive – Terminal 5 – October 25, 2014
The first of many shoegaze moments occurred near the beginning of Slowdive’s sold-out Terminal 5 show on Saturday night. The group—pioneers of a sound that combines loud, fuzzy guitars and ethereal vocals, now emulated by a plethora of contemporary bands—recently reunited after disbanding in the mid-’90s. While strobe lights flickered around them, Neil Halstead and Rachel Goswell began to sing “Catch the Breeze” from 1991’s Just for a Day. As the song progressed, all band members (minus the drummer) were focused intently on their guitars, bass and effects pedals, necks craned downward, rocking gently back and forth amid the dreamy chords—the classic shoegaze stance and sound.

As Slowdive played precise and lovely versions of crowd favorites like “Crazy for You,” “Machine Gun” and “Souvlaki Space Station,” they cycled through an impressive lineup of guitars, even taking a moment to give a nod of appreciation to their guitar tech, a constant onstage presence between songs, swapping and receiving and replacing armfuls of guitars. To their credit, for a band with such intricate guitar arrangements and dynamics, Slowdive’s songs sounded bright and clean, never muddy or muddled, often classic shoegaze stumbling blocks.

“This is a pop song, kind of,” proclaimed Halstead before the band played what may have been the night’s crowd favorite, “Alison.” Indeed, a catchy song on the surface with moderately morose lyrics, it’s a prime example of Slowdive’s signature subtle hypnotic power, a sound that was exhilarating to experience live. By giving us a taste of their classic shoegaze, Slowdive managed to also feel completely modern and fresh—a very successful reunion indeed. —Alena Kastin

Photos courtesy of Adela Loconte | adelaloconte.com

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Foster the People – United Palace – October 24, 2014

October 27th, 2014

Foster the People - United Palace - October 24, 2014

Photos courtesy of Joe Papeo | www.irocktheshot.com

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The Kills – The Bowery Ballroom – October 23, 2014

October 24th, 2014

The Kills - The Bowery Ballroom - October 23, 2014

Photos courtesy of Gregg Greenwood | gregggreenwood.com

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Bombay Bicycle Club – Terminal 5 – October 22, 2014

October 23rd, 2014

Bombay Bicycle Club - Terminal 5 - October 22, 2014

Photos courtesy of Joe Papeo | www.irocktheshot.com

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Allen Stone – Terminal 5 – October 9, 2014

October 10th, 2014

Allen Stone - Terminal 5 - October 9, 2014

Photos courtesy of Joe Papeo | www.irocktheshot.com

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Bastille – Radio City Music hall – October 9, 2014

October 10th, 2014

Bastille - Radio City Music Hall - October 9, 2014

Photos courtesy of Brian C. Reilly | www.briancreilly.com

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Florida Georgia Line – Terminal 5 – October 9, 2014

October 9th, 2014

Florida Georgia Line - Terminal 5 - October 9, 2014

Photos courtesy of Sean O’Kane | seanokanephoto.com

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Foxygen – Music Hall of Williamsburg – October 8, 2014

October 9th, 2014

Foxygen - Music Hall of Williamsburg - October 8, 2014

Photos courtesy of Peter Senzamici | petersenzamici.com

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The Airborne Toxic Event’s Group Effort at Terminal 5

October 8th, 2014

The Airborne Toxic Event – Terminal 5 – October 7, 2014

The Airborne Toxic Event – Terminal 5 – October 7, 2014
I’ve always thought of the Airborne Toxic Event as a band that’s been around far longer than they have. Because there’s something about them that screams comfort and confidence on a big stage like Terminal 5, something that usually only comes from a seasoned band with lots of experience. Although they only formed in 2008, last night the five-piece put on a show with the aplomb of an act that’s been around twice as long.

The Airborne Toxic Event crammed a career’s worth of songs into the show, and even from up close the full-page set list looked like it was written in 12-point font. A feathery 20-foot avian sculpture adorned the stage and provided the production an ethereal quality— drummer Daren Taylor practically looked like he could take flight—as they crisscrossed back and forth among songs from their self-titled debut, 2011’s All at Once and 2013’s Such Hot Blood. Lead singer Mikel Jollett never seemed happy in one place, taking each chance he could to leave his microphone to wail on his guitar or tease the crowd. Within the first half hour of the set, he was hanging from the facade of Terminal 5’s second floor and joking with the crowd he was singing and dangling above.

Anna Bulbrook was lively, too, as she took turns doubling up the vocals, ripping on her violin and tapping away at her keyboard. Guitarist Steven Chen and bassist Adrian Rodriguez put on a show of their own on the opposite side of the stage as they shredded their way through their parts of every song. It was the kind of group effort you expect from a band with decade-spanning experience, and it hopefully means that the Airborne Toxic Event will be around for that long … or more. —Sean O’Kane

Photos courtesy of Sean O’Kane | seanokanephoto.com

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The Afghan Whigs – Music Hall of Williamsburg – October 5, 2014

October 6th, 2014

The Afghan Whigs - Music Hall of Williamsburg - October 5, 2014

Photos courtesy of Gregg Greenwood | gregggreenwood.com