Tag Archives: Photos

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Allen Stone – Terminal 5 – October 9, 2014

October 10th, 2014

Allen Stone - Terminal 5 - October 9, 2014

Photos courtesy of Joe Papeo | www.irocktheshot.com

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Bastille – Radio City Music hall – October 9, 2014

October 10th, 2014

Bastille - Radio City Music Hall - October 9, 2014

Photos courtesy of Brian C. Reilly | www.briancreilly.com

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Florida Georgia Line – Terminal 5 – October 9, 2014

October 9th, 2014

Florida Georgia Line - Terminal 5 - October 9, 2014

Photos courtesy of Sean O’Kane | seanokanephoto.com

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Foxygen – Music Hall of Williamsburg – October 8, 2014

October 9th, 2014

Foxygen - Music Hall of Williamsburg - October 8, 2014

Photos courtesy of Peter Senzamici | petersenzamici.com

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The Airborne Toxic Event’s Group Effort at Terminal 5

October 8th, 2014

The Airborne Toxic Event – Terminal 5 – October 7, 2014

The Airborne Toxic Event – Terminal 5 – October 7, 2014
I’ve always thought of the Airborne Toxic Event as a band that’s been around far longer than they have. Because there’s something about them that screams comfort and confidence on a big stage like Terminal 5, something that usually only comes from a seasoned band with lots of experience. Although they only formed in 2008, last night the five-piece put on a show with the aplomb of an act that’s been around twice as long.

The Airborne Toxic Event crammed a career’s worth of songs into the show, and even from up close the full-page set list looked like it was written in 12-point font. A feathery 20-foot avian sculpture adorned the stage and provided the production an ethereal quality— drummer Daren Taylor practically looked like he could take flight—as they crisscrossed back and forth among songs from their self-titled debut, 2011’s All at Once and 2013’s Such Hot Blood. Lead singer Mikel Jollett never seemed happy in one place, taking each chance he could to leave his microphone to wail on his guitar or tease the crowd. Within the first half hour of the set, he was hanging from the facade of Terminal 5’s second floor and joking with the crowd he was singing and dangling above.

Anna Bulbrook was lively, too, as she took turns doubling up the vocals, ripping on her violin and tapping away at her keyboard. Guitarist Steven Chen and bassist Adrian Rodriguez put on a show of their own on the opposite side of the stage as they shredded their way through their parts of every song. It was the kind of group effort you expect from a band with decade-spanning experience, and it hopefully means that the Airborne Toxic Event will be around for that long … or more. —Sean O’Kane

Photos courtesy of Sean O’Kane | seanokanephoto.com

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The Afghan Whigs – Music Hall of Williamsburg – October 5, 2014

October 6th, 2014

The Afghan Whigs - Music Hall of Williamsburg - October 5, 2014

Photos courtesy of Gregg Greenwood | gregggreenwood.com

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La Roux – Terminal 5 – October 4, 2014

October 6th, 2014

La Roux - Terminal 5 - October 4, 2014

Photos courtesy of Mina K

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Real Estate – Terminal 5 – October 2, 2014

October 3rd, 2014

Real Estate - Terminal 5 - October 2, 2014

Photos courtesy of Jeremy Ross | jeremypross.com

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Lenka – Rough Trade NYC – October 2, 2014

October 3rd, 2014

Lenka - Rough Trade NYC - October 2, 2014

Photos courtesy of Lina Shteyn | www.linashteyn.com

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Brazilian Girls – Brooklyn Bowl – October 1, 2014

October 2nd, 2014

Brazilian Girls - Brooklyn Bowl - October 1, 2014

Photos courtesy of Lina Shteyn | www.linashteyn.com

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Delta Spirit Prove That Three Is Better Than One

October 2nd, 2014

Delta Spirit – The Bowery Ballroom – October 1, 2014

Delta Spirit – The Bowery Ballroom – October 1, 2014
Why celebrate the release of your new album with one show when you can do it with three? That was the mindset of Delta Spirit, who last night played the second of three sold-out shows at three different venues. This one was in The Bowery Ballroom, which was buzzing after a rollicking opening set from Streets of Laredo. The stage was set up with long floor-to-ceiling white slats reminiscent of a giant picket fence. Nothing more simple, quaint America than a white picket fence, but the reality was much more interesting as the slats became a segmented screen for a series of on-the-fly projections that alternated between arty, dreamlike and full-on psychedelic. Similarly, the band taking the stage: guitars, drums, bass and a little keyboard—nothing more simple, quaint American rock and roll than that. Again, the truth was infinitely more interesting, as Delta Spirit proved to be a force, putting on one of the better rock and roll shows I’ve seen this year.

They opened with a one-two punch of “From Now On” and “Tear It Up,” the former from their new album, Into the Wide, and the latter from their 2012 self-titled release. It was the equivalent of kicking down the door and bursting into the room guns a-blazing. There was a constant churl of electric guitar from William McLaren as Matt Vasquez riled up the crowd like only the best frontmen can. If things seemed a bit more intense during that second song, they were. As Kelly Winrich hopped on a second drum kit, joining Brandon Young in kicking things up a few notches. From there, the crowd was completely in the band’s hands, compelled to sing and clap along as the five-piece mixed up new material and old. As the digital projections spiraled behind them, Vasquez and Co. kept things intriguing without falling back on long guitar solos or extended rock jams. It was a combination of great songs, choreographed interplay among bass, guitar, drums and keys, and just pure manic energy that proved to be totally irresistible.

A highlight middle section centered on “Live On” seemed propelled almost entirely on Jonathan Jameson’s superlative bass playing. Around the time when most Bowery headliners announce their last song, Vasquez informed the excited audience that they were about halfway done. And while that wasn’t exactly true, the next 30 minutes, kicked off by “Language of the Dead,” played out like one long epic closing number: a master course and total deconstruction of how to put on a great rock show. “Children” was the highlight of the closeout, a great display of dynamics, the band waxing and waning as little digital mites buzzed around a surreal cityscape behind them. The encore centered on the new LP’s fiery title track, Vasquez belting out the lyrics with plenty of emotion left in his tank. Of course, the encore featured a trio of rockers total, because why close a show like that with one song when you can do it with three? —A. Stein

Photos courtesy of Sean O’Kane | seanokanephoto.com

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Black Lips – Music Hall of Williamsburg – October 1, 2014

October 2nd, 2014

Black Lips - Music Hall of Williamsburg - October 1, 2014

Photos courtesy of Greg Pallante | gregpallante.com

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Augustines Take to the Streets

September 30th, 2014

Augustines – The Bowery Ballroom – September 29, 2014

Augustines – The Bowery Ballroom – September 29, 2014
Augustines have become synonymous with the tricky combination of moral victories and abject failures, if not unique, certainly associated with living in New York City. Theirs is a story of name changes, near misses and eventual triumph: Pela splitting into We Are Augustines and Thieving Irons, and then We Are Augustines becoming Augustines. After a performance on his show, it was finally David Letterman—a guy who appreciates tragicomedy—who suggested the band’s debut LP, Rise You Sunken Ships, as a bromide with which to face down struggle. The band took the stage at The Bowery Ballroom last night with a Billboard-charting second record, a movie about their ascendancy recently funded on Kickstarter, Rise, and maybe a bit of a crisis about transitioning from the band that could never get it right to the one that seemingly couldn’t miss.

Lead singer Billy McCarthy kicked off the show with “Headlong into the Abyss,” a song he closed with the coda “It’s good to be home. We’re going the distance.” But this was no conversational promise: The show would end more than two hours later out in front of the venue on the Delancey St. sidewalk. The band marched through their brand of underdog rock, playing “Chapel Song” and the pointed “Cruel City.” The latter prompted McCarthy to issue a pseudo-apology: “I might say some bad things about this town in the songs, but I got love for you all.” The New York City focus rarely left the band’s focus. In fact, McCarthy introduced “Waiting on the Stairs” by yelping, “This one’s for New York”—as if there were anything else to say.

The frontman launched himself from the top edge of the kick drum and brandished the neck of his guitar like a Tommy Gun to the delight of the assembled. An increasingly soft-at-the-edges McCarthy reaching for the top of the room proved to be something of an allegory. If the National stormed out of the NYC market with their willingness to replicate and repeat being miserable despite all evidence to contrary, Augustines continue to mine the against-the-odds narrative, even while the band approaches becoming an overdog. McCarthy still desired connection, perhaps the band’s enduring truism, first taking to the center of the room and then the street outside for an acoustic encore. This commitment to New York City was more than an aesthetic choice, McCarthy, sweating profusely, shed down to his undershirt in the unseasonable humidity of the Lower East Side, surrounded by his people. —Geoff Nelson

Photos courtesy of Greg Pallante | gregpallante.com

(Augustines play Rough Trade NYC on Friday.)

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Kasabian – Terminal 5 – September 27, 2014

September 29th, 2014

Kasabian - Terminal 5 - September 27, 2014

Photos courtesy of Gregg Greenwood | gregggreenwood.com

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Uncle Acid & the Deadbeats – Bowery Ballroom – September 26, 2014

September 29th, 2014

Uncle Acid & the Deadbeats - The Bowery Ballroom - September 26, 2014

Photos courtesy of Brian C. Reilly | www.briancreilly.com