Tag Archives: Photos

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Richard Ashcroft – Terminal 5 – March 27, 2017

March 28th, 2017

Richard Ashcroft – Terminal 5 – March 27, 2017

Photos courtesy of Gregg Greenwood | gregggreenwood.com

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The Regrettes – Rough Trade NYC – March 27, 2017

March 28th, 2017

The Regrettes - Rough Trade NYC - March 27, 2017

Photos courtesy of Silvia Saponaro | www.saponarophotography.com

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Hayley Kiyoko – The Bowery Ballroom – March 27, 2017

March 28th, 2017

Hayley Kiyoko - The Bowery Ballroom - March 27, 2017

Photos courtesy of DeShaun Craddock | dac.photography

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Foxygen – Terminal 5 – March 24, 2017

March 27th, 2017

Foxygen - Terminal 5 - March 24, 2017

Photos courtesy of Mina J

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At the Drive-In – Terminal 5 – March 22, 2017

March 23rd, 2017

At the Drive-In - Terminal 5 - March 22, 2017

Photos courtesy of Adela Loconte | adelaloconte.com

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Bring Me the Horizon – Terminal 5 – March 20, 2017

March 21st, 2017

Bring Me the Horizon - Terminal 5 - March 20, 2017
(Bring Me the Horizon play Terminal 5 again tonight.)

Photos courtesy of Brian C. Reilly | www.briancreilly.com

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Green Day/Against Me! – Barclays Center – March 15, 2017

March 16th, 2017

Green Day/Against Me! - Barclays Center - March 15, 2017

Photos courtesy of Joe Papeo | www.irocktheshot.com

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All Them Witches – The Bowery Ballroom – March 10, 2017

March 13th, 2017

All Them Witches - The Bowery Ballroom - March 10, 2017

Photos courtesy of Silvia Saponaro | www.saponarophotography.com

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The Flaming Lips – Terminal 5 – March 9, 2017

March 10th, 2017

The Flaming Lips - Terminal 5 - March 9, 2017
(The Flaming Lips play the Westburty Theater tomorrow night.)


Photos courtesy of Dana (distortion) Yavin | distortionpix.com

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The Radio Dept. Make It Seem Effortless at The Bowery Ballroom

March 9th, 2017

The Radio Dept. – The Bowery Ballroom – March 8, 2017

The Radio Dept. – The Bowery Ballroom – March 8, 2017
The Radio Dept. speak the wispy language of dream pop, straddling the spaces between badass and poignant, in the middle of My Bloody Valentine jacked up on something and Stereolab with highlights of ’80s-synth sentimentality à la Pet Shop Boys. There’s no question the band’s influences are long and distinguished, it’s just that because of the inflection and swerve, you only hear them. Last night the benevolent Swedes graced The Bowery Ballroom with a methodically expert set. Select songs from their catalog of rock electronica dating back to 2001 were played as an almost continuous DJ set come to life. Their return to New York City promised a devoted turnout, and the room was filled with fans spanning from old faithful to newly enchanted.

“Sloboda Narodu,” the glorious tribal synth anthem from last year’s Running out of Love, opened the proceedings, immediately putting the crowd in the palm of the band’s hands, which were steady as a surgeon’s. A self-assuredness propelled the performance, with members handling their contribution to each song like a tactician whose measures are second nature. This amounted to a natural flow, with attendees instinctually following along. More than anything, the Radio Dept. just wanted to jam—that much was evident. They’ve never been afraid to embellish in flowing blankets of up-tempo, electronically contoured instrumentation. This holds true onstage, and as they leaned into every groove, the Radio Dept. made it seem effortless.

Sometimes frontman Johan Duncanson sounded like Euro contemporary Markus Acher of the Notwist. The messages of political awareness were there yet felt like they were absorbed subliminally, in hushed expression that blended into the nebulous formations of sound. You’re reminded of the import of content amidst the spell they cast when Duncanson momentarily mentioned, “This next one is called ‘Death to Fascism.’” The Radio Dept. quite simply have a knack for pushing out immaculate, steady and uninterrupted rhythms whether on record or onstage. And last night’s winding journey through more than 15 years of vibrant, animated music was a gratifying retrospective. —Charles Steinberg | @Challyolly

Photos courtesy of Charles Steinberg | charlesosteinberg.com

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Grandaddy Prove to Be Worth the Wait at Rough Trade NYC

March 3rd, 2017

Grandaddy – Rough Trade NYC – March 2, 2017

Grandaddy – Rough Trade NYC – March 2, 2017
There are albums that define an individual at a certain time of life, and for me it was Grandaddy’s The Sophtware Slump. I was a recent college graduate figuring out adulthood and working a “dream job” at my local radio station. Something about Jason Lytle’s specific lyrics laid across a series of bleeps and electronic haze struck a chord in me. I was first introduced to them when they opened for a then rising British band, Coldplay. That evening was highlighted by the special guest appearance by a barely recognizable Elliott Smith, whom Grandaddy had toured with prior. When the group disbanded back in 2006, there were morsels released in the form of a solo album by Lytle and side projects in Admiral Radley, but Grandaddy would not resurface until 2012 with a few local California gigs and select festivals in the UK. On the eve of their long-awaited fourth album, Last Place, the Golden State band played a sold-out Rough Trade NYC last night.

Opening their set with an abstract film filled with landscape juxtaposed with pixels, the quintet surfaced to the stage as if no time had passed. The crowd quickly got into it as Grandaddy opened with back-catalog gems “Hewlett’s Daughter” and “El Caminos in the West.” The evening would satisfy longtime fans, while introducing newer material like their first single from their latest, “Way We Won’t,” and follow-up single “Evermore.” The frontman was barraged with several requests midway through their set, but none of them were on the list. One fan graciously offered, “Your choice, Jason,” in which Lytle took the opportunity to segue into the spacey favorite “The Crystal Lake.”

The room erupted when the whimsical intro to “A.M. 180” signaled the audience to bop along to the melody, but it was near the end of the set that Lytle wrapped the night with an extra special bow. Going from new track “I Don’t Wanna Live Here Anymore” to the slow-burner “Jed’s Other Poem (Beautiful Ground),” he initiated the climax with a revved-up “Now It’s On.” Although the set concluded with harp-like keys on “He’s Simple, He’s Dumb, He’s the Pilot,” the enduring bandmates would return to encore with a pair, the new song “The Boat Is in the Barn” and oldie-but-goodie “Summer Here Kids.” Needless to say Grandaddy’s return was so worth the wait. Let’s hope there won’t be another decade-long hiatus. —Sharlene Chiu

Photos courtesy of Gregg Greenwood | gregggreenwood.com

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Dead Coast – Mercury Lounge – March 2, 2017

March 3rd, 2017

Dead Coast - Mercury Lounge - March 2, 2017

Photos courtesy of Silvia Saponaro | www.saponarophotography.com

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The Griswolds – The Bowery Ballroom – February 28, 2017

March 1st, 2017

The Griswolds - The Bowery Ballroom - February 28, 2017

Photos courtesy of Brian C. Reilly | www.briancreilly.com

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K.Flay – The Bowery Ballroom – February 27, 2017

February 28th, 2017

K.Flay - The Bowery Ballroom - February 27, 2017

Photos courtesy of DeShaun Craddock | dac.photography

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Run the Jewels Kick Off Four-Night Run at Terminal 5 with Fiery Set

February 27th, 2017

Run the Jewels – Terminal 5 – February 25, 2017

Run the Jewels – Terminal 5 – February 25, 2017
While New York City was sweating out some of the hottest days on record for a February, on Saturday night, Run the Jewels kicked off their takeover of the city at Terminal 5, the first of four shows in the city El-P calls home. By now you should be well familiar with the group, the greatest buddy rap duo spitting rhymes poised to save the world from the guy with a “bad toupee and a spray tan.” Everyone in the crowd was ready for the takeover, losing their minds to the opening bars of Queen’s “We Are the Champions” as Killer Mike and El-P came to the stage. When the bass dropped in opener “Talk to Me,” it was powerful enough to bounce the crowd up off the vibrating floorboards. “Legend Has It” welcomed thousands of “RTJ” chants, raised finger pistols and fists.

An extra bass-y rendition of “Call Ticketron” had Mike and El-P running around, crisscrossing each other center stage and passing off their verses like a baton. “I’ve been imagining being here with family and friends all tour,” said El-P, nearly choked up. His mother was there for the night, no doubt proud of her son as he pantomimed lines like “You can run backward through a field of dicks” off “Oh My Darling Don’t Cry.” But it was Gangsta Boo who had both Mike and El blushing, coming out to absolutely murder her potty-mouthed verses on “Love Again (Akinyele Back).” She had the crowd chanting “pussy power” before returning the stage to Run the Jewels. “She makes me uncomfortable every night,” said El-P, adding, “I’m so ready to elect Gangsta Boo for President of the United States of America. At least she’s truthful!” Some thoughts were then shared on the current president as El-P introduced the charged “Lie, Cheat, Steal.”

The set ended with the song that began it all, “Run the Jewels.” Killer Mike retold the group’s story, meeting in El-P’s Brooklyn to record his own album, R.A.P. Music, and becoming inseparable ever since. “You done good, Ma,” exclaimed Mike, his arm around El-P. They returned to perform an encore of “Close Your Eyes (And Count to Fuck)” and “Down,” a song about challenges conquered and overcome. The night must have felt like a victory lap for the duo, a return to where it all started just a few years ago, having since taken over the world. Don’t expect them to slow down anytime soon because rappers who speak truth to power are needed now more than ever. —Dan Rickershauser | @D4nRicks

Photos courtesy of Jeremy Ross | jeremypross.com

(Some tickets remain to see Run the Jewels tonight and on Wednesday.)