Tag Archives: Record Store Day

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Evan Dando Celebrates Album Reissue at The Bowery Ballroom

June 23rd, 2017

Evan Dando first burst into the mainstream fronting the Boston band the Lemonheads as the ’90s stalwarts’ singer, songwriter and guitarist—and occasionally as their drummer. Landing in the sweet spot between indie rock and melodic punk, the prolific group put out seven full-length albums between 1987 and 1996 before going on an extended hiatus two years later. Eventually they’d get back together, but before doing so, Dando (above, performing “Hard Drive” live in New York City), mixing power pop and country-rock, put out his solo debut LP, Baby I’m Bored (stream it below), in 2003. “Lots of low-key, three-chord songs, sung in his achingly lovely voice and lasting not a second more than need be,” according to AllMusic. “Even if it seems unassuming and underwhelming upon its first listen, Baby I’m Bored with each spin reveals the uniform strength of the songs and the sweet, understated charms of Dando as a performer.” Earlier this year, on Record Store Day, the album was reissued with the addition of outtakes, covers and B-sides. “The songs on Baby I’m Bored show an artist venturing deeper into himself than ever before to produce some of his most magnetic, vulnerable work,” says Paste. “Once the needle hits the record, it’s hard to imagine any committed listener turning away.” And to celebrate the album’s reissue, Dando plays The Bowery Ballroom on Saturday night. Another Boston singer-songwriter, Jason Lowenstein, opens the show.

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Record Store Day – Rough Trade NYC – April 22, 2017

April 24th, 2017

Steve Earle - Rough Trade NYC - April 22, 2017

Photos courtesy of Silvia Saponaro | www.saponarophotography.com

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The Dandy Warhols – Rough Trade NYC – April 16, 2016

April 18th, 2016

The Dandy Warhols – Rough Trade NYC – April 16, 2016

Photos courtesy of Adela Loconte | adelaloconte.com

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Marco Benevento Leaves Them Smiling at Music Hall of Williamsburg

April 18th, 2016

Marco Benevento – Music Hall of Williamsburg – April 16, 2016

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It’s kinda fun to trace the path that took Marco Benevento from the avant-garde basement of the old Knitting Factory in Tribeca to the point where he was standing atop his piano at Music Hall of Williamsburg on Saturday night, towering over the crowd in a black-and-white-and-Dayglo-striped suit, top hat and pink sunglasses like a live-action Dr. Teeth. But it’s a lot more fun to just fully enjoy the moment. And there were plenty of them to be had when the Benevento’s infectious, happy-go-lucky energy—and his backing duo—turned the Brooklyn crowd on its head and everyone just surrendered to the fun.

Of course, you don’t begin an evening by hopping up on your instrument, that’s something you have to build toward. The set opened with “Dropkick,” off the recently released The Story of Fred Short, Benevento singing through the verses before opening into concentric circles of piano jams. Right off, his bandmates—Andrew Borger on drums and Karina Rykman pinch-hitting on bass (regular bassist Dave Dreiwitz playing with Ween across the river)—established themselves as guardians of the groove for the evening. While the crowd was quick to join the party and dance, no one was enjoying themselves as much as the three musicians onstage.  The highlight mid-section of the show was a performance of the entire B-side of the new album, which is a sort of concept record. Played live, the music was an explosive prog-rock disco, each piece finding a deeper and more open-ended funk. Rykman was a revelation, often leading the charge with splatter-paint fuzz bass accented by head slamming, body gyrations and a Cheshire Cat grin. Benevento was equally as animated, both on and off the piano, finding his way into the crowd during “I Can’t See the Light” to dance and pose for pictures.

The second half of the set was heavy on instrumentals from Benevento’s growing catalog, each song showing off Benevento’s skills at composition and improvisation. Sing-along, earworm melodies opened up into penetrating jams, his piano augmented by synth and samples, the music swerving between grooves and deep rocking, Borger and Rykman providing equal parts push and pull. And yes, there was dancing and strutting and piano hopping, and even a couple of unironic “Take it to the bridge” mentions in there as well. For the encore, Benevento brought out opener Mikaela Davis on harp to accompany a nice version of David Bowie’s “Heroes,” which began as just a pensive duet, but when the band returned, with an additional guest—Katie Jacoby on violin—the mood quickly shifted back to giddy party and the follow-up quintet version of the Rolling Stones’ “Let’s Spend the Night Together” was a perfect we’re-gonna-make-your-cheeks-hurt-from-smiling finish to the night. —A. Stein | @Neddyo

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I Break Horses Gallop into Williamsburg

April 21st, 2014

I Break Horses – Rough Trade NYC – April 18, 2014

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A wide range of Swedish artists, like Robyn, the Knife and Little Dragon, have made some of the most infectious dance music over the past few years. And Maria Lindén and Fredrik Balck continue in that vein as I Break Horses. Following the release of their sophomore effort, Chiaroscuro, earlier this year, the two have embarked on their first-ever headlining tour in North America. Their label, Bella Union, describes the pair’s evocative sound as “a gorgeous Scandinavian croon that’s bathed in an ocean of reverb and tremelo,” and Lindén and Balck are no strangers to performing to huge crowds, having previously opened for M83 and Sigur Rós.

But on the eve of Record Store Day, the Swedes fittingly performed at the intimate Rough Trade NYC in Brooklyn. Lindén raised an arm for the show to commence against the throbbing drums of “Medicine Brush.” And while she later had some synth troubles, the band swiftly recovered with crowd-favorite “Denial” to the delight of concertgoers happily bobbing their heads to the beat. I Break Horses followed with a pair from their debut, Hearts“Load Your Eyes” and the shimmering synth-filled title song—before the set closed with the thumping “Faith.” But the band returned to encore with the swirling “Winter Beats.” —Sharlene Chiu