Tag Archives: Skittish

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A Double Dose of Mike Doughty This Weekend

March 1st, 2017

Mike Doughty—who at one time worked the door at the Knitting Factory—fronted the NYC quartet Soul Coughing in the ’90s. But when they broke up in 2000, he decided to go it alone, releasing his first solo LP, Skittish (stream it below), which he’d actually recorded four years earlier. Doughty has been a busy man ever since, touring, putting out more albums and even finding time to become a blogger and author known for his sense of humor. Last October, Doughty (above, performing “Madeline and Nine” live at Paste Studio) released his ninth studio album—and 19th overall—The Heart Watches While the Brain Burns (stream it below), the first he’s recorded since leaving behind NYC for Memphis, Tenn. “Whether it be the influence of age, Memphis, or a musical phase, The Heart Watches While the Brain Burns finds a relatively more mature and steady Doughty, both in sound and tone, and it suits his often world-weary observational sketches,” according to AllMusic. The singer-songwriter is currently on the road with the biggest band he’s ever toured with: a cello/bass player, drums, a second guitarist, an organist, plus a backing vocalist. The show consists of basically live remixing. Using hand gestures, Doughty improvises changes in what the musicians in the band are doing—stopping, starting, getting louder or quieter, changing their parts, repeating their parts. The songs are Soul Coughing songs and Doughty solo songs, but none are ever performed the same way twice. Don’t miss Mike Doughty on Friday at Music Hall of Williamsburg and on Saturday at The Bowery Ballroom. Brooklyn six-piece Wheatus open both shows.

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Mike Doughty Plays Soul Coughing on Saturday at Webster Hall

November 22nd, 2013

Mike Doughty—who at one time worked the door at the Knitting Factory—fronted the NYC quartet Soul Coughing in the ’90s. But when they broke up in 2000, he decided to go it alone, releasing his first solo LP, Skittish, which he’d actually recorded four years earlier. Doughty (above, performing a solo take on “Super Bon Bon,” for A-Sides) has been a busy man ever since, touring, putting out more albums and even finding time to become a blogger and author known for his sense of humor. But after years of not playing Soul Coughing material, he’s currently busy reliving his full-band catalog, playing entire shows comprised of songs from the band’s Ruby Vroom (stream it below), Irresistible Bliss and El Oso. And you’ve got one last chance to see Doughty performing these Soul Coughing gems because he closes out his tour on Saturday at Webster Hall.

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Low and Mike Doughty Come to Music Hall of Williamsburg Tonight

June 19th, 2013

Known for slow-paced instrument-driven music and layered vocals, Low formed in Duluth, Minn., 20 years ago. Their debut album, I Could Live in Hope, came out in 1994 and won over fans thanks to its minimalist sound and its delicate harmonies from husband and wife Alan Sparhawk (vocals and guitar) and Mimi Parker (drums and vocals). The two originally teamed up with high school–student John Nichols (bass), who was ultimately replaced by Steve Barrington. Over the years, Low (above, doing “Monkey” live on KEXP FM) have added electronic-music flourishes to their work as they’ve continued to record new material, including this year’s acclaimed Jeff Tweedy–produced The Invisible Way (stream it below), all while remaining known for their live performances.

Mike Doughty—who at one time worked the door at the Knitting Factory—fronted the NYC quartet Soul Coughing in the ’90s. But when they broke up in 2000, he decided to go it alone, releasing his first solo LP, Skittish, which he’d actually recorded four years earlier. Doughty (below, performing “Na Na Nothing,” also for KEXP) has been a busy man ever since, touring, putting out more albums and even finding time to become a blogger and author known for his sense of humor. But currently, he’s on the road with Low. And you can see them both tonight at Music Hall of Williamsburg.