Tag Archives: the Faint

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The Faint Turn Music Hall of Williamsburg into a Dance Party

May 15th, 2014

The Faint – Music Hall of Williamsburg – May 14, 2014

The Faint – Music Hall of Williamsburg – May 14, 2014
I’m a firm believer in the difference between favorite shows and the best shows that one sees over the years. They aren’t mutually exclusive concepts, but the ideas behind them are driven by differing meanings. When I saw the Faint open for Bright Eyes at Webster Hall in 2005, it was the kind of show that landed in both categories, one so memorably loud and fun that it’s stuck with me all these years. And seeing them again last night at Music Hall of Williamsburg for the first time in nine years, not much had changed, in a good way. After taking the stage to thunderous sound effects and slowly whooping sirens, the Nebraska dance rockers launched into an hour-and-a-half set, stretching late into the night.

While their music makes for great listening, the Faint’s live show feeds more senses. Matching and alternating with the dance beat of each song, beams of colored light quickly swept over the band, often while strobe lights popped and patterns flashed on giant LED panels at the back of the stage. Early in the set the band’s relentlessly pulsing club sound was in strong form on new songs like “Animal Needs,” a track off their newest release, Doom Abuse. But the crowd’s fever pitched when the band began reaching back a decade or more by playing their older material, bouncing around at a medium pace during “Posed to Death” before going wild when drummer Clark Baechle got to the machine-gun drum hits that preceded a big “HEY!” shout that everyone joined in on.

And when the Faint followed that with “I Disappear” from their most popular album, 2004’s Wet from Birth, the Music Hall floor started to bounce just like the one at Webster Hall does so often now (and did so memorably at that show in 2005). From that point forward, those kinds of moments escalated, notably during songs like the breakdown “Agenda Suicide”—the opening track to 2001’s epic Danse Macabre—which had fans hollering, and during the encore when singer Todd Fink said, “We’re going to turn this into a dance party now if you don’t mind” (as if that hadn’t already been happening) before the band finally played “Glass Danse,” arguably their biggest hit. By that time, what was left of the crowd obliged, crushing plastic drink cups beneath their feet as they jumped around to the beat. —Sean O’Kane

Photos courtesy of Greg Pallante | gregpallante.com

(The Faint play Webster Hall on Saturday and The Bowery Ballroom on Monday.)

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Three Chances to See the Faint in New York City

May 13th, 2014

The Faint started out making lo-fi indie rock in late-’90s Omaha, Neb., helping that town’s music scene blow up as part of Saddle Creek Records. But over the years both their lineup—now Todd Fink (vocals, keys), Clark Baechle (drums), Michael “Dapose” Dappen (guitar) and Jacob Thiele (keys, vocals)—and their sound have changed. By their second album, Blank-Wave Arcade (stream it below), the Faint (above, doing “I Disappear” for MoshCam) had begun moving toward a more dance-oriented sound, earning comparisons to Devo and the Cure. Next came Danse Macabre (stream it below) in 2001. Although the album, with its heavy-hook-filled dance rock (albeit with some dark material), was influenced by New Wave, it still managed to sound modern rather than retro. The Faint recently released Doom Abuse (stream it below), their first album of new music since 2008, to some considerable acclaim. “The Faint keeps things fresh,” according to the A.V. Club: “Thankfully, Doom Abuse reclaims both the vibrancy and spontaneity of the group’s best work.” They’re currently touring the country in support of their new work, and they’re giving New York City plenty of love, playing Music Hall of Williamsburg tomorrow, Webster Hall on Saturday and The Bowery Ballroom on 5/19. So don’t miss out.

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Going Back in Time with the Faint

December 10th, 2012

The Faint – Terminal 5 – December 7, 2012


Back in 2001 when Omaha, Neb., band the Faint toured behind Danse Macabre, their unique homage to the dark, synth-laden dance music of the ’80s, they performed as if even the most modest of venues were multilevel clubs—throwing their bodies around, bouncing their energy off the ceilings and achieving some of the sweatiest of dance parties. More than 10 years later, having recently reissued a deluxe version of Danse Macabre, the Faint performed the album in its entirety at Terminal 5 on Friday night, complete with the dazzling lights, visuals and sound system their music was always meant for.

Fortunately, time has been kind to the band. Despite the passing of years, they still have their hair and their slick dance moves—and judging from the crowd, a whole generation of new fans. Beneath dizzying strobe lights, the band opened the show with “An Unseen Hand,” a new song that maintains their classic musical reference points and dark themes along with a slight influence from current electronic dance music. After the crowd was warmed up with a selection of songs from more recent albums, the opening bars of Danse Macabre’s “Agenda Suicide” signaled that we had officially begun our descent back to 2001. The band proceeded to burn through favorites like “Glass Danse,” “Your Retro Career Melted” and “Posed to Death,” as the crowd danced along with unceasing abandon. Danse Macabre’s final song, the slow and moody “Ballad of a Paralysed Citizen,” seemed to offer the crowd a respite from dance and a chance to breathlessly Instagram their neon-light laden photos of the band.

The Faint closed out the show by dipping even deeper into their catalog with “Worked Up So Sexual” and “Call Call” (“This one’s from the ’90s!” singer Todd Fink announced with a hint of amazement). Judging by the extreme pleasure the Faint brought to the crowd by revisiting their early material, the band’s longtime devotion to delivering an epic show, no matter what the setting, continues to pay off. —Alena Kastin

Photos courtesy of Greg Notch | notch.org

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Don’t Miss the Faint at Terminal 5 Tomorrow Night

December 6th, 2012

The Faint started out making lo-fi indie rock in late-’90s Omaha, Neb., helping that town’s music scene blow up as part of Saddle Creek Records. But over the years both their lineup—now Todd Fink (vocals, keys), Clark Baechle (drums), Dapose (guitar) and Jacob Thiele (keys, vocals)—and their sound have changed. By their second album, Blank-Wave Arcade, the Faint (above, doing “Glass Danse” for MoshCam.com) had begun moving toward a more dance-oriented sound, earning comparisons to Devo and the Cure. Next came Danse Macabre in 2001. Although the album, with its heavy-hook-filled dance rock (albeit with some dark material), was influenced by New Wave, it still managed to sound modern rather than retro. Recently Saddle Creek remastered and reissued the LP (stream it below), and you can see the Faint play all of Danse Macabre tomorrow at Terminal 5.

The Faint/Ladytron

April 10th, 2009

Each time the guys in the Omaha, Neb., dance-punk band the Faint have made changes—their name, their lineup, their sound, their record label—they somehow seem to grab a little more attention. Their most recent album, the band’s fifth full-length studio effort, the spelling-challenged Fasciination, was released last year. And now the Faint are co-headlining a tour across North America with Ladytron, the Liverpool electronica outfit. See them tonight at Webster Hall, and check out the Faint here, performing “Paranoiattack.”