Tag Archives: Tom Petty

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A Top Five Look Back at 2014

December 31st, 2014

Colourful 2014 in fiery sparklers

Top Five Albums
1. The War on Drugs, Lost in the Dream
2. Total Control, Typical System
3. Run the Jewels, Run the Jewels 2
4. Coldplay, Ghost Stories
5. Parquet Courts, Sunbathing Animal —Charles Steinberg

Top Five Memorable Shows
1. Feist, Tarrytown Music Hall, 4/10
When I heard Feist was doing a tiny solo acoustic tour, I forked over ducats for this one. There were bits of stand-up-like banter with the audience as she stripped down the material. But what really made the night was a mini-reunion with former bandmate (and ex) Kevin Drew as they dueted on the Broken Social Scene classic “Lover’s Spit.”
2. (tie) Rhye, Webster Hall, 2/21
This performance was a bit misleading because although singer Milosh and producer Robin Hannibal are the members in Rhye, the latter member doesn’t tour. But Milosh’s ethereal voice really is the heart and soul of the pair, and it shone greatest for the hit “Open.” His deceptively androgynous voice sounds at times like Sade or even Antony Hegarty.
(tie) Max Richter, The Bowery Ballroom, 12/7
When I saw that the German-British composer was playing Bowery, I had to hop to it. As Richter usually plays symphony concert halls, it was an interesting choice to play such a smaller venue. The Ballroom felt like a recital hall with the audience entranced. What can I say: I’m a sucker for artists playing unorthodox venues.
3. Glass Animals, The Bowery Ballroom, 7/7
I was recently reminded of this concert when my yoga instructor played “Gooey” in class. Pretty fitting, right? In addition to infectious dance melodies, frontman Dave Bayley’s gangly limbs flayed erratically that evening, bringing to mind another dude named Thom Yorke. The two lads have great music and dance moves to boot. Coincidence? I think not.
4. Phox, Knitting Factory, 7/22
The buzz swirling around this Wisconsin band post-SXSW had me tuned into their album all spring and into the summer. Frontwoman Monica Martin was definitely a bit tipsy, but that didn’t detract from her lush vocals or onstage camaraderie. (Check out Schuyler Rooth’s review of their Mercury Lounge gig.)
5. (tie) Mr. Little Jeans, Rough Trade NYC, 5/10
Opening for Sohn, Norwegian singer Monica Birkenes, aka Mr. Little Jeans, overshadowed the headliner for me. It’s rare when that happens, but this lady has a knack for übercatchy dance-pop songs that streamed through my head all summer. She mentioned how she often came here as a child and was really craving a good slice of pizza. What’s not to love?
(tie) Alvvays, Rough Trade NYC, 7/28
New York City summers are packed with free outdoor gigs throughout the boroughs, but this in-store performance with Alvvays stood out amongst the rest. Their infectiously happy songs illuminated the dark back room of Rough Trade but had folks departing into the night with an extra bounce in their step. —Sharlene Chiu

Top Five Just a Man and His Guitar Solo Sets (chronological order)
1.
Dustin Wong (opening set), The Bowery Ballroom, 4/21
2. Plankton Wat, Trans Pecos, 5/8
3. Steve Gunn, Mercury Lounge, 5/18
4. Willie Watson, Mercury Lounge, 5/21
5. Leif Vollebekk (opening set) The Bowery Ballroom, 11/21 —A. Stein | @Neddyo

Top Five Memorable Shows
1. Sylvan Esso, Rough Trade NYC, 9/11
Both my favorite album and my most memorable live show of 2014 came from Sylvan Esso. Amelia Meath and Nick Sanborn possess unwavering emotive energy, and every single lyric and beat has sunk into my psyche . I saw the duo perform live twice this year, most recently at their headlining show at Rough Trade NYC. The duo’s erudite electronica boosted the audience as they performed the entirety of their self-titled debut album plus and few clever covers.
2. Broods, Mercury Lounge, 3/3
Comprised of New Zealander siblings Caleb and Georgia Nott, Broods blend melodic melancholia with sparkling synths and glitchy beats. After getting wrapped up in their self-titled debut EP, I simply had to see them live. Broods played their first NYC show to an incredibly enthusiastic sold-out crowd at Mercury Lounge.
3. Hozier, The Bowery Ballroom, 5/13
Hozier’s rich voice and ardent lyrics sit front and center in his compositions. When he headlined The Bowery Ballroom back in May, he was flanked by equally talented musicians who created dazzling harmonies with choral echoes and rock hooks. Hozier and his bandmates mesmerized the audience, including me.
4. Dan Croll, The Bowery Ballroom, 4/17
Dan Croll’s brand of pop is highly addictive, and his live show is equally intoxicating. He fuses lilting pop, wonky electronica and tribal beats and tops it all off with clever lyrics and airy vocals.
5. Kishi Bashi, The Bowery Ballroom, 6/4
Kishi Bashi has what so many musicians seek, and that is an astounding live presence. It’s as if this guy belongs onstage. Kishi Bashi played back-to-back sold-out New York City shows this past June and stunned audiences with his whimsical finesse and astute lyrics. This picture and my review prove that Kishi Bashi’s live performance is one big euphoric dream sequence. —Schuyler Rooth | @Schuylerspeak

Top Five Albums
1. Under the Pressure, the War on Drugs
Channeling Dylan and Springsteen beneath Adam Granduciel’s vocals and personal struggles to stunning effect, this Philly six-piece put out, for me, far and away the top album of the year.
2. Benjamin Booker, Benjamin Booker
From the very first listen, Benjamin Booker’s self-titled debut sounds familiar, not like you’d previously heard its influences, but rather you’d actually already heard this album. The music is lived in and alive and a joy to listen to again and again.
3. 77, Nude Beach
Eighteen songs that sound like the love children of late-’70s Tom Petty and Elvis Costello. You’ll smile the whole time you listen to it.
4. Dancin’ with Wolves, Natural Child
Recording for the first time as a five-piece, and moving away from gritty garage rock to
a more full-band bluesy country sound (with a side of boogie), these Nashville boys took a huge step forward.
5. Morning Phase, Beck
Six years removed from his previous offering, Beck’s slow-building emotional relative of Sea Change captures you from the very first note. —R. Zizmor | @Hand_Dog

Top Five Memorable Shows
1. Pearl Jam, I Wireless Center (Moline, Ill.), 10/17
Playing a small (for them) venue (for the first time) on a Friday night in the middle of nowhere, Pearl Jam put on the best show by any band I’ve seen in the past four years. They performed No Code in its entirety and covered Pink Floyd, John Lennon, Van Halen and Neil Young. Frontman Eddie Vedder put it best, comparing the appearance to a blind date: “You get there and she opens the door, and it’s like, she’s hot!”
2. My Morning Jacket, One Big Holiday (Riviera Maya, Mexico), 1/29
I could’ve chosen any of MMJ’s performances from this run, but the last night was the longest show and it particularly stood out thanks to the perfect weather, the we’re-on-vacation-in-the-middle-of-winter party vibe and carefully chosen covers (including Jim James singing, “Something, something, something” in “Rock the Casbah.”)
3. the War on Drugs, The Bowery Ballroom, 3/20
I absolutely loved, loved, loved Under the Pressure and was extremely excited to hear it live. The War on Drugs did not disappoint, plus they even threw in a stellar rendition of “Mind Games” to boot. (As an added bonus, the night began with Drive-By Truckers at Terminal 5 and closed with green sauce and salt-baked goodness at New York Noodletown.
4. Jonathan Wilson, Music Hall of Williamsburg, 2/14
It was a Friday night and Valentine’s Day. But if you were expecting something quiet and romantic, you’d have been way off. Jonathan Wilson and Co. delivered 16 jammed-out (but not self-indulgently) songs over the course of two-and-a-half hours.
5. Deer Tick, Allen Room, 3/6
As part of the American Songbook series, Deer Tick played an incredibly intimate, seated show in front of a wall of windows revealing Columbus Circle below. It was one of those moments that makes you grateful to live in New York City. —R.Z.

 

 

 

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The Men Celebrate a New Album Tomorrow at The Bowery Ballroom

March 4th, 2014

They began making punk(-ish) music back in 2008, but with the release of New Moon (stream it below), last March, the Men moved in a different sonic direction: still tapping into feedback and distortion, but doing so over more classic-rock sounds, or what Allmusic calls “creating a sound akin to Dinosaur Jr. on a serious Tom Petty kick.” But that was 12 whole months ago, an eternity to a prolific group like this Brooklyn five-piece. So, naturally, they return with the ambitious Tomorrow’s Hits (stream it below), their fifth album in five years, out today. This time, according to Rolling Stone, “the band reinvent themselves yet again as a slamming blue-eyed soul group.” “We had been kickin’ the horns idea around for a little while,” singer-guitarist Mark Perro told the magazine, “thinking about Fun House by the Stooges, Exile on Main Street by the Stones and all those old classics Stax and Motown records.” Band members—Perro, singer-guitarist Nick Chiericozzi, guitarist Kevin Faulkner, bassist Ben Greenberg and drummer Rich Samis— share singing duties, and while performing live, the guys in the Men (above, playing “Settle Me Down” for KEXP FM) occasionally get lost in a solo, with their back to the crowd, but it doesn’t mean they’ve lost focus. Instead, they’re just caught up in the music. Get caught up in the music yourself when the Men celebrate their new album tomorrow night at The Bowery Ballroom.

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The Men Play Music Hall of Williamsburg Tonight

November 5th, 2013

They began making punk(-ish) music back in 2008, but with the release of New Moon (stream it below), their fourth full-length in as many years, in March, the Men have moved in a different sonic direction: still tapping into feedback and distortion, but doing so over more classic-rock sounds—or what Allmusic calls “creating a sound akin to Dinosaur Jr. on a serious Tom Petty kick.” Band members share singing duties, and while performing live, the guys in the Men (above, playing “Jennifer” for KEXP FM) occasionally get lost in a solo, with their back to the crowd, but it doesn’t mean they’ve lost focus. Instead, they’re just caught up in the music. And you’ll be, too, tonight at Music Hall of Williamsburg. And while you’re at it, make sure you arrive early enough to catch Purling Hiss and Pampers.

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Two Big Local Bands Take the Stage at Barclays Center

September 19th, 2013

Earlier this year, art-punk trio Yeah Yeah Yeahs—frontwoman Karen O, drummer Brian Chase and guitarist Nick Zinner—released their fourth full-length, Mosquito (stream it below). The album includes production work from LCD Soundsystem’s James Murphy and TV on the Radio’s Dave Sitek among others, and in praising it, the A.V. Club says the album “takes a much more open-ended, and less studied, approach to Yeah Yeah Yeahs’ electric eccentricity.” Of course, Yeah Yeah Yeahs (above, performing “Sacrilege” on Late Show with David Letterman) are most known for the fiery live performances, and you can see these hometown musical heroes tonight at Barclays Center. But do yourself a favor and get there early enough to see Har Mar Superstar.

Another big local band, Vampire Weekend—college buddies Ezra Koenig (vocals and guitar), Chris Baio (bass and vocals), Rostam Batmanglij (keys and vocals) and Chris Tomson (drums)—also put out an acclaimed new album this year, Modern Vampires of the City (stream it below). The band’s much-praised third LP is a bit of a departure, abandoning the post-college themes of their previous work, but gaining plaudits in the process, with Rolling Stone winningly comparing the quartet’s new tunes to Paul Simon and Tom Petty. But, like Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Vampire Weekend (above, doing “Diane Young” on Saturday Night Live) are best experienced live. And alongside Solange and Sky Ferreira, they play Barclays Center tomorrow night.

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Morning Teleportation and Desert Noises Together at Mercury Lounge

August 9th, 2013

Tiger Merritt (vocals and guitar), Tres Coker (drums), Travis Goodwin (keyboards) and Paul Wilkerson (bass) met in Bowling Green, Ken., and formed Morning Teleportation. The psychedelic four-piece, with the “combined energy of a basement party, a back-room jam session and a futuristic hootenanny,” recorded their debut album, Expanding Anyway (stream it below) over 12 days in Modest Mouse frontman Issac Brock’s home studio. The result, according to Consequence of Sound, is “driving four-on-the-floor beats, a glimmering polyphonic mix of synthesizer and electric guitar lines and a variety of crazed, Coltrane-esque guitar solos or trumpet lines.” But their album is just a start because Morning Teleportation (above, playing “Salivating for Symbiosis” for Audiotree) are quickly becoming known for their high-energy live shows.

Another four-pack of friends—Kyle Henderson (vocals and guitar), Brennan Allen (guitar), Patrick Boyer (drums) and Tyler Osmond (bass)—formed Desert Noises. You can pick up some of the Orem, Utah, outfit’s influences in their music, which is kind of a folkie Americana (think: Tom Petty and Fleetwood Mac) with some unpredictable twist and turns (think: Tame Impala). Thanks to an intense touring schedule, Desert Noises (above, performing “27 Ways”) built a loyal following even before their first LP, the melodious Mountain See (stream it below) came out in late 2011. They’re currently working on their second release, but you can see Desert Noises alongside Morning Teleportation tomorrow night at Mercury Lounge.

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Lose Your Inhibitions Tomorrow Night with Nude Beach

January 17th, 2013

Singer-guitarist Chuck Betz, drummer-singer Ryan Naideau and bassist Jimmy Shelton all grew up on Long Island’s North Shore, but they began playing music together in Brooklyn. At first it was “just a really fun way to get together on the weekends and get drunk and play music,” said Naideau. But it eventually became something more. In 2008 the power-pop trio took the name Nude Beach and began making rock music in the vein of Tom Petty, the Replacements and Elvis Costello, or as Consequence of Sound puts it: “Nude Beach echoes the past without drooling in the rearview mirror.” This becomes totally clear upon listening to last year’s II (stream it below) just once. Check out Nude Beach, above, doing “Walkin’ Down My Street,” and then do yourself a favor and go see them play the late show tomorrow night at Mercury Lounge.

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Cut Loose with the Music of Tom Petty Tonight at Webster Hall

October 24th, 2012

You know who has a million great songs you probably already know by heart? Tom Petty. The guy’s a legendary hitmaker who’s been making music to raucously sing along to since 1976. Blues, roots, rock, country. You name it, he’s done it. And tonight at Webster Hall, the Cabin Down Below Band—the same guys behind Dylan Fest and Stones Fest—are having a party to celebrate his music. And they won’t go it alone. Far from it! Expect guests galore, like Father John Misty, Andrew W.K., Justin Townes Earle, Delta Spirit, Karen Elson, Ryan Miller of Guster, Jody Porter of Fountains of Wayne, Caveman, Petter Ericson Stakee of Alberta Cross and lots, lots more. As an added bonus, 100 percent of ticket proceeds will benefit the Sweet Relief Musicians Fund and the Musicians Cancer Fund. And a word of advice: You might want to take a sick day tomorrow.