Tag Archives: TV on the Radio

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Metric Play Intimate Hometown Show at Music Hall of Williamsburg

November 30th, 2016

Metric – Music Hall of Williamsburg – November 29, 2016

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Before the 21st century, a musical collective out of Toronto formed by the name of Broken Social Scene and spawned such acts as Feist, Stars and Metric. The environment was a supportive one, nurturing a space where each band could thrive. The founding duo of Metric, Emily Haines and James Shaw, moved to New York City in the late ’90s and recorded early demos that would provide material for their first studio album. Fast-forward a decade and some change, the indie-rock band released a sixth studio album, Pagans in Vegas, last fall. And last night they returned to Brooklyn for a sold-out Music Hall of Williamsburg show as part of the Steve Madden Music series.

Fashioning a black cap, the lead singer took center stage kicking off the evening with a rousing rendition of “Speed the Collapse,” followed by the up-tempo “Youth Without Youth” as guitarist Ward added Auto-Tuned choruses. Haines had a few wardrobe changes, with the most notable being a luminescent cape that glowed against the black lights. (Added kudos to the lighting tech for her mastery of the syncopation of pulsating white shocks to several songs.) For crowd favorite “Dead Disco,” Haines turned up the showmanship, thrusting her fist and engaging the crowd from right to left. Bassist Joshua Winstead drove in the throbbing introduction to “Front Row,” as Haines took over with her melodic chants of “Burned out stars they shine so bright.”

The frontwoman noted that it was a hometown show for the band and great to “rekindle memories of North 6th.” A lot has changed since Haines and Ward moved here and shared a Williamsburg loft with soon-to-be members of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Liars and TV on the Radio. As the singer stripped down “Combat Baby” to a shortened a cappella interlude, I couldn’t help but relate the lyrics to a recent presidential candidate’s resilience. Following up that with “Gold Guns Girls” seemed to emphasize the formation further with Haines donning a guitar to jam with Winstead and Shaw, who closed out the song with an electrifying solo. The evening came to a close with singer and guitarist paired for a stripped-down “Gimme Sympathy,” before Winstead and drummer Joules Scott-Key rejoined the band for the finale, “Breathing Underwater.” —Sharlene Chiu

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Foals Play United Palace on Friday Night

November 1st, 2016

Formed in Oxford, England, more than a decade ago, FoalsYannis Philippakis (vocals and guitar), Jack Bevan (drums), Jimmy Smith (guitar, synths and vocals), Walter Gervers (bass and vocals) and Edwin Congreave (keys, synths and vocals)—are well-known for their unique mix of post-punk, dance music and New Wave. Following the release of several singles that earned them buzz-band status, Foals’ debut full-length, the melancholic Antitdotes (stream it above), produced by TV on the Radio’s Dave Sitek, came out in 2008. AllMusic called it “not merely a lesson in post–New Wave noodling, but evidence of the power and excitement of the genre and music itself.” The band’s been busy recording and touring ever since. Their most recent full-length, What Went Down (stream it below), arrived last year, impressing the folks at Rolling Stone: “Their fourth and best album plays up a dark, bracing urgency.” And while their albums are terrific, Foals (above, doing “What Went Down” at this year’s Lollapalooza) are most known for their live performances. So go see them play United Palace on Friday night. Bear Hands and Kiev open the show.

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TV on the Radio Light Up Kings Theatre

May 21st, 2015

TV on the Radio – Kings Theatre – May 20, 2015

(Photo: Charles Steinberg)

(Photo: Charles Steinberg)

For all of their prowess and earned accolades, TV on the Radio have always come across as a neighborhood band, the kind you’d see watching a Knicks game at local bar, coming up with their songs. It’s because of their familiarity and accessibility that you feel closer to them when they perform, and this mood was apparent last night at Brooklyn’s Kings Theatre, a place that reinforces the intimacy of sharing song and expression. “Thank you very much for coming to this beautiful fucking theater,” said frontman Tunde Adebimpe, “It’s very nice to be home.” The band had been relatively quiet the past three years, turning inward and out of sight to process the passing of bassist Gerard Smith, but they have been eager to tour behind their newest record, Seeds, and this enthusiasm was felt from the start.

The first block of the show was almost entirely dedicated to flaunting their new work, but the introduction of “Young Liars,” rolling in gradually with the meditative sprawl that brought to mind Talk Talk or Yo La Tengo then building to exultation, let concertgoers know how far this group has come. Adibempe’s vocal refrain of “Thank you for taking my hand” absorbed all in attendance. Through lyrics that have always revealed a search to measure and understand the fluctuation of emotions connected to modern romance and meaningful rumination, Adebimpe is able to sound vulnerable without sounding soft. You can hear the seasoning of the soul that comes with experience of tangled relationships, and while he may have been hurt, he ain’t no punk, able to resurface and revisit his past through music that carries the tonal gravity substantive enough to meet the profundity of his offerings of existential observation.

The thing about live performance is that the room is open to be filled as much as the band can push out. Songs can be expanded on parts that are contained in a recording, and new tempos can be assigned to make tunes more suitable for live format—“Careful You” and “DLZ” were such examples, the latter rocked out in a manner that recalled Living Colour. The intention of Seeds was to make you want to sing along, and that took on a particular significance in TV on the Radio’s hometown. The songs echoed and resonated. With much of the new material covered, “Wolf Like Me” brought a howling response from the audience. The classic “A Method” began like a baseball-stadium organist made to play at gunpoint, and the home team, TVOTR, was joined onstage by opening act Bo Ningen, with everyone banging on anything they could find, bottles, loose cymbals, all pulsing against the venue’s walls. Witnessing TV on the Radio on the Kings Theatre stage last night, still united and in sync after more than a decade of comings and goings of countless other rock-fusion groups, brought both warmth and chills, and the triumphant feeling that some bands will always be there with us, right around the corner. —Charles Steinberg

(TV on the Radio play Terminal 5 tonight.)

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Double Your Pleasure with TV on the Radio Twice This Week

May 19th, 2015

Three years ago, TV on the Radio experienced incredibly happy and sad milestones just nine days apart, when they put out their fourth full-length, Nine Types of Light (stream it below), not even two weeks before bassist Gerard Smith succumbed to lung cancer. But the beloved hometown band has been back in a big way, busily touring and promoting their fifth album, Seeds (stream it below), since its release last fall. The LP explores a different sound. “Their old experimental noises have now taken a back seat to 4/4 beats, jangling guitars, punky power chords and immediate dance grooves,” per the Guardian. “A band emerging from the darkness to throw open the curtains.” Of course despite a different recorded sonic direction, TV on the Radio (above, doing “Happy Idiot” for KCRW FM) are still a band that brings it live every night. And you’ve got two chances to see them this week, tomorrow night at Kings Theatre in Brooklyn and on Thursday at Terminal 5.

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TV on the Radio End Tour at Home at Music Hall of Williamsburg

November 24th, 2014

TV on the Radio – Music Hall of Williamsburg – November 22, 2014

TV on the Radio – Music Hall of Williamsburg – November 22, 2014
There was a time when Williamsburg was still an affordable place to live, before New York City’s music scene exploded with a handful of bands that would go on to define indie-rock music at the turn of the millennium—the Strokes, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Interpol and TV on the Radio. That last group had their gestation period take place in Williamsburg, so it makes sense that they’d wrap up their latest tour in their home base. Still absolutely adored here, the band easily sold out three local shows (plus a free in-store appearance at Rough Trade NYC), with their final appearance taking place at a packed Music Hall of Williamsburg on Saturday night. The performance kicked off with one of TV on the Radio’s very first songs, an unraveling expansive soundscape that slowly evolved its way toward the introductory vocal coos of “Young Liars.” Its energy notched up incrementally until dissipating into the taut funkiness of “Golden Age.”

Singer Tunde Adebimpe was a stage-performing spectacle. Whichever hand wasn’t holding his microphone was almost always miming out the song, sometimes reaching out to the audience as if to lend them a hand into the tune. “The age of miracles/ The age of sound/ Well there’s a Golden Age/ Comin’ round, comin’ round, comin’ round,” Adebimpe sang in “Golden Age,” spiraling his hand in the air before extending it out to the audience: Grab my hand, hop on board and let’s check it out. Then there was the near constant harmonizing with Kyp Malone, and if there’s one thing that’s instantly recognizable as TV on the Radio, it’s the two of them singing together, with Malone always several octaves higher in the highest of falsettos. It splits the expressive possibilities of their songs in half, and in it’s best moments the two of them sing the same lyrics with different emotions. On “Careful You,” off their new album, Seeds, one seems to be singing a statement and the other a plea.

The older numbers had a more abrasive edge than the newer ones. “I Was a Lover,” with all its jittery, stuttering rhythm, encapsulates the Bush-era anxieties of the mid-’00s as well as any other song of that time. On “Wolf Like Me,” the band made things as loud as possible. Dave Sitek even brought out a four-foot wind chime, rattling the hell out of it as the song finished. Contrast that with the new tune that followed, “Trouble,” and its reassurances in the chorus of “‘Everything’s gonna be OK/ Oh, I keep telling myself, ‘Don’t worry, be happy’/ Oh, you keep telling yourself.” TV on the Radio’s encore kicked off with “Forgotten,” off Nine Types of Light, Adebimpe leading the audience in chanting, “Light,” to combat life’s darkness. The set closed with “Staring at the Sun,” their first single, the perfect finish to a tour-ending show in their hometown, where once upon a time it had all begun. —Dan Rickershauser | @D4nRicks

Photos courtesy of Gregg Greenwood | gregggreenwood.com

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Grow a Pair: Win Free Tickets to See TV on the Radio on 10/22

November 18th, 2014

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Local favorites TV on the Radio release their fifth studio album, Seeds, today. And they’re celebrating its release with sold-out shows tonight at the Apollo Theater and Friday and Saturday at Music Hall of Williamsburg (plus an in-store appearance at Rough Trade NYC tomorrow). But the good news is that The House List is giving away two tickets to see TV on the Radio on Saturday night in Brooklyn. Want to go? Try to Grow a Pair. Just fill out the form below, making sure to include your full name, e-mail address, which show you’re trying to win tickets to (TV on the Radio, 11/22) and a brief message explaining your favorite tune on the new album. Eddie Bruiser, who’s already got his favorites, will notify the winner by Friday. Good luck.

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A Celebration Record-Release Party at Mercury Lounge

September 25th, 2014

Married couple Katrina Ford (vocals and percussion) and Sean Antanaitis (multiple instruments) began making music together in Ann Arbor, Mich., before trying out Chicago and then New Orleans prior to settling into Baltimore’s rich local music scene. Once there, they teamed up with David Bergander (drums) to form Celebration—Tony Drummond (keys), Tommy Rouse (guitar) and Walker Teret (bass) have since joined the band. The group’s brooding self-titled debut album, produced by TV on the Radio’s Dave Sitek, came out in 2005. AllMusic weighed in: “Theatrical and heartfelt, Celebration is a fully realized debut that promises even better things to come.” Last month the six-piece (above, doing “Tomorrow’s Here Today” for WTMD FM) released their fourth studio LP, Albumin (stream it below), filled with psychedelic rock and soul. AllMusic said, “They take their massive sound in directions that show they can do much more than glowering post-punk and glowing dream pop.” Join the party when Celebration, well, celebrate the new album’s release tomorrow night at Mercury Lounge. Keeping it in Charm City, Ed Schrader’s Music Beat opens the show with a heavy dose of drum, bass and reverb.

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Two Big Local Bands Take the Stage at Barclays Center

September 19th, 2013

Earlier this year, art-punk trio Yeah Yeah Yeahs—frontwoman Karen O, drummer Brian Chase and guitarist Nick Zinner—released their fourth full-length, Mosquito (stream it below). The album includes production work from LCD Soundsystem’s James Murphy and TV on the Radio’s Dave Sitek among others, and in praising it, the A.V. Club says the album “takes a much more open-ended, and less studied, approach to Yeah Yeah Yeahs’ electric eccentricity.” Of course, Yeah Yeah Yeahs (above, performing “Sacrilege” on Late Show with David Letterman) are most known for the fiery live performances, and you can see these hometown musical heroes tonight at Barclays Center. But do yourself a favor and get there early enough to see Har Mar Superstar.

Another big local band, Vampire Weekend—college buddies Ezra Koenig (vocals and guitar), Chris Baio (bass and vocals), Rostam Batmanglij (keys and vocals) and Chris Tomson (drums)—also put out an acclaimed new album this year, Modern Vampires of the City (stream it below). The band’s much-praised third LP is a bit of a departure, abandoning the post-college themes of their previous work, but gaining plaudits in the process, with Rolling Stone winningly comparing the quartet’s new tunes to Paul Simon and Tom Petty. But, like Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Vampire Weekend (above, doing “Diane Young” on Saturday Night Live) are best experienced live. And alongside Solange and Sky Ferreira, they play Barclays Center tomorrow night.

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Five Questions with … Brian Cherchiglia of the Bottom Dollars

September 5th, 2012

(Photo: Ky DiGregorio)

 

With lush harmonies layered over a booming rhythm section, the Bottom Dollars play the kind of blues- and soul-infused rock that’s best experienced live. The Brooklyn five-piece’s second album, Good News, Everyone!, comes out on 9/18. (Listen to their new single, “Pieces” and its B-side, “Work,” below.) And in support of it, they’re getting ready to launch a cross-country tour, which kicks off on Saturday at Mercury Lounge with the Nuclears and the Naked Heroes. Ahead of the show, we caught up with Brian Cherchiglia (vocals, guitar), who answered Five Questions for The House List.

Which New York City musician—past or present—would you most like to play with?
Wow, that’s a pretty intense question. I’d love to collaborate with the guys from TV on the Radio, a cowrite with Tunde Adebimpe would be a dream come true. And then there’s the whole Bob Dylan thing. David Byrne, Method Man, Eugene Hütz … shit. I’m going Bob Dylan for the win with Tunde as a close second, so long as I can blaze with Method Man and Redman at some point in this fictional scenario.

When it comes to new songs, do you always work them out first in the studio? Or do they sometimes come together live onstage?
You know, we’ve been really fortunate to receive such great praise on our recordings but none of our songs are ever composed in a studio setting. They kind of teleport between my bedroom and our rehearsals. Normally, I’ll write these songs acoustically and just mess with them until I can present them to the band once they’ve evolved into more of a complete thought. That way, we can work on the arrangement as a group and let them take shape into something that’s more “big picture,” and that’s really where Evan [Berg, drums and vocals] shines as a composer. He’ll subconsciously understand where the song needs to go, and within one or two runs through it’s there.

And does new material ever continue to evolve when played live so that it becomes something different than the recorded version?
One of the best things about the Bottom Dollars is that we’re very much a “live band.” Each show is different. Set lists vary. The arrangements are fairly elastic and purposefully so, because when you’re performing, and a great transition or segue presents itself, it’s really important to capitalize on that and put yourself in that zone where it’s up to the collective rather than the individual. Improvisation is really important to accentuate a particular performance of a song (if the arrangement calls for it), and guitar solos are fucking badass. Plain and simple.

Do you have to be depressed to write a sad song? Do you have to be in love to write a love song? Is a song better when it really happened to you?
Wow. Every songwriter is different, so I can really only speak for myself here, but yes and no. I think it’s more important to be cognitive and pay attention to what’s actually happening around you (and to you), absorb what’s truly going down and then remember it in a way that makes you comfortable. I think it’s really important to just let yourself be happy, let yourself be sad and know what that’s actually like so when you write about it, it isn’t too abstract that someone can’t connect to it.

Does Good News, Everyone! differ from your previous work in tone or content? Or is it just a natural progression from one album to the next?
It’s definitely louder than The Halcyon Days, and I feel like it might be a bit riskier. It’s definitely a bigger sound, because now we have Shappy [Dan Shapiro, lead guitar] and Chris [Urriola, bass] to round out the sound. It’s definitely more intelligent, the production is cooler. So I’d say it’s definitely a natural progression. We’re growing, and Good News, Everyone! definitely shows that. —R. Zizmor

EXCLUSIVE VIDEO: Metric Unplugged at the Bowery Hotel

June 21st, 2012

Mere hours after unveiling tunes off their just-released fifth album, Synthetica, for a horde of adoring fans inside the cozy Music Hall of Williamsburg, Emily Haines and Jimmy Shaw of Metric invited us into a posh suite at NYC’s Bowery Hotel to tape a performance for The Bowery Presents Live channel on YouTube, which posts awesome sessions like this one every week (see them all here).

At the hotel, the duo stripped away the electric throb of their new single, “Youth Without Youth,” down to two-part harmonies, acoustic guitar and harmonica (!). All that remained from the original was a spare, digital beat, saddled up through Shaw’s iPhone.

After performing, the duo talked about their origins in NYC and Brooklyn, hanging with members of Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Stars and TV on the Radio, and how NYC helped shape the sound of Synthetica. Watch the interview here.

Metric returns to town September 23 at Radio City Music Hall. Tickets are still available.

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TV on the Radio, Back in Brooklyn

April 13th, 2011

TV on the Radio – Music Hall of Williamsburg – April 12, 2011

TV on the Radio - Music Hall of Williamsburg - April 12, 2011
Just after 10 last night, as TV on the Radio took the stage at a sold-out Music Hall of Williamsburg, the pouring rain on North 6th Street began to dissipate. And bathed in dim blue light, Tunde Adebimpe sang the opening line of “Killer Crane”: “After the rain, a killer crane, after the rainbow….” With the crowd beginning to dry off, it was a weather-appropriate choice of song to segue into the band’s hotly anticipated performance in support of their new record, Nine Types of Light, released the same day.

Large photographic lighting umbrellas and lights adorned the stage, and TV on the Radio experimented with more than nine types of light as they played. The upbeat “Young Liars” punctuated with a bright, almost sunny yellow, deep reds during the catchy new song “Keep Your Heart” and complete darkness broken up by flashes of strobe light during the aggressive moments in “Dancing Choose.” TV on the Radio seemed happy to be celebrating their album’s release (and warming up for their show at Radio City Music Hall tonight) with a hometown performance, and they whipped the crowd into a frenzy with the energy of old favorites like “Wolf Like Me,” “Blues from Down Here” and “Staring at the Sun,” and alternately, set a more subdued tone during downtempo new numbers “Will Do” and “You.”

Throughout the show, the complementary interplay between singers Adebimpe’s and Kyp Malone’s distinctive voices, flourishes from trombone and the subtle addition of a small set of wind chimes dangling from the neck of Dave Sitek’s guitar added to the complexity of the band’s sound. The set seemed to effortlessly emphasize TV on the Radio’s uncanny ability to touch upon various genres and influences in their music and yet come across sounding like nothing else out there. And almost as an unplanned encore to the group’s live exploration of Nine Types of Light, shortly after the show, the rain came back, and some of the first lighting of the season flashed across the Brooklyn sky. —Alena Kastin

Photos courtesy of Greg Notch | notch.org

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Try to Win Tickets to Themselves/Buck 65 on Sunday

April 28th, 2010

The Northern California musical duo Themselves—rapper Adam Drucker (Doseone) and producer Jel (Jeff Logan)—got started in the late ’90s, bringing heady lyrics to underground hip-hop. They’ve since put out three full-length albums, the most recent of which, CrownsDown, came out last year, following a six-year hiatus.

Richard Terfry, straight out of Nova Scotia, Canada, is a radio host, turntablist and MC who performs under the name Buck 65. He’s got a deep background in hip-hop but touches it up with blues, country, folk and rock influences. And he’s prolific, having released a slew of albums, EPs and singles since 1995.

Why is this important? Because Themselves (above, performing “Gold Teeth Will Roll”) and Buck 65 (below, doing “Dang”), along with Jel and Odd Nosdam and Stabbing Eastwood (featuring Tunde Adebimpe of TV on the Radio), play The Bowery Ballroom on Sunday. Want to go? Then hit up Eddie@BoweryPresents.com, telling him why you deserve a free Sunday night out. He’ll get in touch if you win.

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TV on the Radio – Prospect Park Bandshell – August 11, 2009

August 12th, 2009

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Photos courtesy of Gregg Greenwood | www.gregggreenwood.com

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The Rain Can’t Put a Damper on TV on the Radio’s Central Park Show

June 8th, 2009

TV on the Radio/Dirty Projectors – SummerStage – June 5, 2009

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TV on the Radio

Friday night, despite the inclement weather, Dirty Projectors and TV on the Radio played to a faithful crowd of rain-soaked onlookers at SummerStage. Although their two monikers suggest technical difficulty, the show went off almost without a hitch. Led by Dave Longstreth, Dirty Projectors, the constantly fluctuating outfit, has hit its stride in its current formation, churning out tunes that shuttle from a cappella to free jazz to afrobeat without missing a step. The group’s X-factor lies in the vocal contributions from Angel Deradoorian, Amber Coffman and Haley Dekle. Their tight, otherworldly harmonies had no trouble rising above Longstreth’s Graceland riffs and Brian McOmber’s erratic drum beats. The set included several cuts from the upcoming Bitte Orca, out tomorrow. Highlights included the new and stellar “Cannibal Resource” and “Stillness Is the Move.”

TV on the Radio began its set just as the last sun rays filtered through the Western skyline. The band launched into an hour-long set, opening with “Love Dog,” while front man Tunde Adebimpe split his time between dancing a samba-like rhythm and manning the loop pedals. As the technologically synesthetic name suggests, TVOTR does not constrain itself to conventional instrumentation. For much of the set, guitarist Dave Sitek played with chimes hung from the tuning peg of his high-E string, occasionally colliding them with Jaleel Bunton’s cymbals. The band played cuts from its three studio albums, evenly dividing the material among each. The show ended with a spectacular rendition of Return to Cookie Mountain’s “A Method.” Adebimpe banged on a cymbal plucked from Bunton’s drum set while Sitek thumped on a drum with two shakers, sending rainwater flying. As the last electronic bursts fizzled, Adebimpe voiced a thank you to New York City with a shout-out to Brooklyn in particular. —Theo Spielberg

Contest

Grow a Pair: Win Free Tickets to TV on the Radio on 6/5

June 2nd, 2009

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“A lot of bands have something to say,” says TV on the Radio’s David Sitek. “We have something to ask.” And here at The House List, so do we: Want to Grow a Pair of free tickets to TV on the Radio’s red-hot, sold-out show this Friday, June 5th, at SummerStage? Since you’ve read this far, your answer is probably yes. So fill out the form below, listing your name, e-mail address, which show you’re trying to win tickets to (TV on the Radio, 6/5) and a brief message telling us which TVOTR song is your favorite and why. Eddie Bruiser, who loves TV, the radio and Central Park, will e-mail the winner by noon on Friday, June 5th. Good luck.

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