Tag Archives: Bird Dog

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Ryan Bingham – Music Hall of Williamsburg – February 6, 2016

February 8th, 2016

Ryan Bingham - Music Hall of Williamsburg - February 6, 2016

Photos courtesy of Marc Millman Photography | www.marcmillmanphotos.com/music

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Our CMJ Music Marathon Shows This Week

October 12th, 2015

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The 35th annual CMJ Music Marathon kicks off tomorrow and lasts through Saturday. And The Bowery Presents has you covered each night—and during the day on Saturday. Check out the showcases at our venues—plus Pianos—this week (that aren’t already sold out).

Tuesday
Mercury Lounge: Firekid

Rough Trade NYC: Paradigm, Am Only and the Windish Agency present Vaults, Methyl Ethel, Gilligan Moss, Steven A Clark, Leikeli47 and No Wyld

Wednesday
Mercury Lounge: CMJ Official Showcase with Oberhofer, Superfood, Bird Dog, Frankie and Marlon Williams

Thursday
Rough Trade NYC: Rough Trade presents John Grant, Ezra Furman, Georgia, Shopping and Hooton Tennis Club

Rough Trade NYC: BBC Introducing & PRS for Music Foundation present Clean Cut Kid, the Big Moon, Pretty Vicious, Georgia and the Jacques

Friday
Rough Trade NYC: Bella Union and Iceland Airwaves present Mammut, Doomsquad, Landshapes, Fufanu and DJ Flugvel og Geimskip

Mercury Lounge: Ruen Brothers, Susto and Zachary Cale

Rough Trade NYC: Aquarium Drunkard presents: No Jacket Required with Protomartyr, Omni, Lemon Twigs, Drinks, Yoko and the Oh No’s, Mothers, Car Seat Headrest and Modern Vices

Saturday
Pianos (beginning at noon), FREE: the Lemon Twigs, Whitney, Methyl Ethyl, Bayonne, Aquilo, Mild High Club, Ben Abraham, Fraser A Gorman, Zachary Cale, Hooton Tennis Club and Car Seat Headrest

Rough Trade NYC: Levitation & Alisa Loog present Ringo Deathstarr, Shannon and the Clams, Drinks, Mild High Club, Whitney

Mercury Lounge: MezzoForte presents Lev,  Powwowwer, Pompeya, Sphynx, Young Empires, Teen Commandments, Velo and Holiday Mountain

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Before Heading Overseas Houndstooth Play Rough Trade NYC

August 28th, 2015

Katie Bernstein (vocals) and John Gnorski (guitar) originally formed the Portland, Ore., band Houndstooth as a duo doing a subtle take on country rock before adding more members to fill out the band’s sound. Their well-received debut full-length, Ride Out the Dark (stream it below), arrived in 2013. “Houndstooth is a band worth exploring, especially for fans of rock that occupies the mellower end of the spectrum without slopping over into Eagles-style lite rock lameness,” according to PopMatters. “There’s been a lot of good music out of Portland in the past few years. Here’s some more.” Houndstooth (above, performing “No News from Home”) returned earlier this year with their follow-up LP, No News from Home (stream it below), which, per AllMusic, doubles down “on the fuzzed-out, Americana-laced dream pop of their 2013 debut, offering up an evocative ten-track set that skillfully pairs the confectionary with the cerebral.” They’re getting ready to head across the Atlantic to tour Europe, but you can catch Houndstooth tomorrow night at Rough Trade NYC. Modern Merchant and Bird Dog open the show.

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Music as Medicine on Saturday Night at Rough Trade NYC

August 18th, 2014

Bobby Long/Dawn Landes – Rough Trade NYC – August 16, 2014

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It had been one of those weeks when upsetting news and disturbing images across the world seemed to fill an even greater percentage of our consciousness than usual—the kind of week that requires some good, honest music to remind you that there are still beautiful things out there. And thankfully, on Saturday night, Rough Trade NYC hosted a bill filled with acts that were just what the doctor ordered. A band to keep your eye on, Brooklyn upstart Bird Dog, opened the show with intelligent songwriting and innovative genre blending. The band hopped among styles easily: a close approximation of a country honky-tonk, a Latin groove machine and a radio-ready pop group in quick succession. And terrific guitar playing and touches of violin impressively punctuated great songs like “Holiday Season” and “Read My Letter.”

Dawn Landes, a one-woman prescription for whatever ails you, played the middle set. Her newest album, Bluebird, comes off like a newly found timeless classic, filled with golden-era country-inflected folk songs. As luck would have it, Robert Ellis, who also has a best-in-class album out this year, joined her. With Landes leading the way with her sweet-tea voice and easy-to-love charm and Ellis chiming in with an occasional harmony and quick acoustic-guitar fills, the duo melted away worries and evaporated strife. The set was full of highlights, from the cover of the sweetly humorous John Prine/Iris Dement duet “In Spite of Ourselves” to the gorgeous trio (with friend Lauren Balthrop singing harmony) on “Twilight.” But my favorite moment was when Landes sang the new album’s title track, a few minutes of perfection.

Bobby Long, who is from NYC by way of London, closed out the night singing folk the old fashioned way—just a man and his guitar onstage. With hair covering his eyes and a heavy dose of Brit humor, Long was introspective with his music. Songs were introduced with quick jokes and “true story” anecdotes, but seemed to grow in his playing, with vivid emotional imagery and broader themes. Singing solo allowed Long to expand his vocals, repeating choruses each time with different emphasis, filling in nicely with bits of fingerpicked guitar. I thought the set highlight was “Kill Someone”—about “fucking assholes”—which was prefaced with a description of Long’s sister’s ex-husband. His jokey introduction of “serious song, no clapping” made way for a piece with real anger that gave it a lively energy. Long described it as “hitting him with lyrics” as opposed to the real-life swing and a miss that his dad tried to lay on the jerk. That song might have had much more of an impact, but when passionately sung by Long it was a damn good one regardless, which counts for something. If only all the world’s problems could be solved with a great song. —A. Stein