Tag Archives: Broncho

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Touring Behind New Album, Broncho Play The Bowery Ballroom

June 24th, 2016

Their second studio album, Just Hip Enough to Be Your Woman (stream it below), won over critics: PopMatters claimed that it’s “more than hip, it’s simply glorious and a paean to the good ol’ days when pop was sharp and concise, and music for teenyboppers was actually non-synthesized and infectious. Try it. You just might like it, and find that this sticks to your teeth like sugar.” And somewhat tweaking their sound, just a few weeks ago, Norman, Okla. Pop-punk quartet Broncho—Ryan Lindsey (vocals and guitar), Ben King (guitar), Nathan Price (drums) Penny Pitchlynn (bass)—released their third full-length, Double Vanity (stream it below), which, according to Spin, “finds the group in a slightly different mood: slower, steamier, denser.” And per AllMusic, “It’s like Broncho took all the energy of their faster songs, extracted the immediacy and punch, then slowed it to half speed. Instead of playing the songs slow and dozy, the band sounds tightly coiled and insistent beneath all the gunk. Sharp hooks emerge on a regular basis, sometimes even floating up to the surface in a big shiny bubble.” And touring behind it, the energetic performers (above, doing “Class Historian” for JBTV Music) play The Bowery Ballroom tonight. Los Angeles dream-pop quartet Winter opens the show.

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Summer’s Coming: Four Big Shows Next Week in New York City

May 13th, 2016

Summer doesn’t actually arrive for another five weeks or so, but the summer-music season gets kicked off next week in a very big way.

Bowling Green, Ky., quartet Cage the Elephant’s fourth studio album, Tell Me I’m Pretty (stream it below), produced by Dan Auerbach, came out last December, impressing Exclaim!: “If your sister were Anita Miller from Almost Famous, she might tell you to listen to Tell Me I’m Pretty with a candle burning. Matthew Shultz has hit the mark lyrically and vocally here, inviting listeners into the emotionally charged and honest world that Cage the Elephant inhabit. Although we still hear his lo-fi, distorted vocals throughout the record, many moments are left confidently unadorned and clear.” Known for their fiery live performances, Cage the Elephant play SummerStage, alongside Portugal. The Man and Broncho, on Monday and Tuesday.


From the land of Britpop, in Manchester, England, the 1975 (above, performing “Love Me” earlier this year on Saturday Night Live) have risen up as a band with global appeal. Their second LP, I Like It When You Sleep, for You Are So Beautiful Yet So Unaware of It (stream it below), arrived in February, topping the charts here and across the Atlantic. “When a band conquers the charts with a fun but inoffensive debut album, you don’t expect them to return with a 17-track follow-up that tempers pop tunes with swampy post-rock instrumentals and references mental health, religion, addiction, loneliness and fame. But the 1975, whose self-titled debut hit number one in 2013, aren’t concerned with playing it safe,” raves NME. They bring their arena-ready rock to Barclays Center on Tuesday night. Wolf Alice and the Japanese House open the show.


Another English band to hit No. 1, Rudimental, the London four-piece, have been making shake-it-don’t-break-it electronic music for just a few years, but that hasn’t stopped them from becoming wildly popular. Their sophomore studio album, We the Generation (stream it below), recorded in Jamaica, came out last fall. The Evening Standard noted its “positive vibes” and “their sunny reworking of dingy old drum and bass.” And on Wednesday at SummerStage, they kick off a short tour with the like-minded North London electronic duo Gorgon City. Brooklyn duo Walker & Royce open the show.

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On Saturday Night Broncho Were the Best Band in the World

May 18th, 2015

Broncho – Rough Trade NYC – May 16, 2015

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For just less than an hour on Saturday night at Rough Trade NYC, Broncho, the Norman, Okla., four-piece, were the Best Band in the World. It is one of those titles that hold the subjective and superlative ephemera that made Zane Lowe’s Hottest Record in the World so satisfying. It was destined to be a passing one but the feeling was unmistakable as two fans climbed onstage near the end of the set during “I Don’t Really Want to Be Social,” the more committed of the two grabbing the microphone and screaming, “Broncho is the shit.” Unscientifically, shit said in this fashion was more like shiiiiiiiit. And as much as judgments like these can be, she was right, and the growing mosh pit proved it.

Broncho opened with a run of songs largely from their excellent 2014 record, Just Hip Enough to Be Your Woman. Sounding a bit like a lost Cars album, lead singer Ryan Lindsey mumbled his way through a good Ric Ocasek impression, riding downstroke guitars on “Kurt,” “It’s On” and “What.” The band then played the middle section of Just Hip Enough in order, running through “Deena,” “Stay Loose,” “NC-17,” “I’m Gonna Find Out Where He’s At” and “Stop Tricking” in succession. The crowd crested, creating a mid-’90s mosh pit in the middle of the floor, suggesting a hint of entropy conspicuously absent from so many New York City rock shows. The band appeared to play harder in response, Lindsey’s sweaty, stretched gray T-shirt occasionally slipping off his left shoulder.

Broncho closed with their most marketable song, “Class Historian,” one of those should-be-a-hit jams still waiting for its moment of mainstream recognition. The energetic audience told the tale, too. There was no better band than this one on Saturday night, the special union of a crowd and the performers recognizing a brief, discrete and passing moment. The girl who’d earlier screamed Broncho’s ascendancy from the stage, ended the night high-fiving anyone in sight, the inevitable afterglow of a moment in a band’s career had, lost and had again. —Geoff Nelson | @32Feet