Tag Archives: Dave Schools

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Catch Jerry Joseph & the Jackmormons Tuesday at Rough Trade NYC

February 5th, 2018

Jerry Joseph is an old-school rock iconoclast, the type for whom opinionated is a politely remote descriptor, but then fades away into a hail of guitar and the spiked delivery of a particularly on-point lyric. And when he’s on—and with his trio, the Jackmormons, there’s no fear of off—he’s a ferocious live show, like Bruce Springsteen or Tom Petty fronting Crazy Horse, and with a world-weary purview that’s emotional, heavy and leaves just enough room for slivers of optimism. Joseph is above all prolific. He has more than 30 albums to his name and some 250 potent original songs, which will form the bulk of what’s sure to be a barn burner of a set at Rough Trade NYC tomorrow night. This time around, he and his Jackmormons (above, performing “Savage Garden”)—Steven James Wright on bass and Steve Drizos on drums—come slinging Weird Blood (stream it below), Joseph’s third album in as many years with Widespread Panic’s Dave Schools as a shrewd producer. Joseph is the first to admit the Weird Blood songs evoke a time of year and a state of mind. “I rented a tiny house about a mile from my home so I could write but be home for dinner and kid bedtime,” he writes in the album’s accompanying notes. “I ended up writing a fistful of songs. It was cold early January but a perfect place to write. Weird stuff was happening in general, one of those weeks where I had my copy of Black Star and David Bowie died. I tend to do the mad scribble thing when I write.” Indeed, Weird Blood runs the Josephian gamut: “Sweet Baba Jay” and its spooked folk rock, “3-7-77,” which feels like it’s trying to escape from its own untidy blues-rock framework, “Wild Wild West,” a tune of his that’s been around for more than two decades and really unfolds live, and “Think On These Things,” a common Joseph show opener but tender enough an anthemic rock song that it’s willing to let in just enough light to be called uplifting. You’ll get a range of styles, plus snatches of songs from one or more of Joseph’s constellation of influences, from Leonard Cohen to Bob Marley. But most of all you’ll get Joseph, who’s earned the right to be called an original, and if you’re in the right frame of mind, could front the best band in the world on any given night. —Chad Berndtson | @Cberndtson

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Jerry Joseph Pulls No Punches at Mercury Lounge on Sunday Night

May 1st, 2017

Jerry Joseph and the Jackmormons – Mercury Lounge – April 30, 2017


Jerry Joseph isn’t one to sugarcoat: As longtime friend Widespread Panic bassist (and sometime bandmate) Dave Schools has put it, his music can be “an absolute emotional slaughterhouse.” Which is not to call it dour—a Jerry Joseph show is a master class in old school, highly emotional rock and roll energy—just that when you experience it you’re often in for a scorched-earth kind of evening, no-holds-barred, no-punches-pulled, no-edges-filed-down, no phony sanctimony. He’s an iconoclast, for sure, and the less he seems to care about how some take to his abrasive sentiments, the more his music deepens and becomes more soulful. It can sound ferocious and cynical, tender and fragile, world-wise and world-weary. And he’s crazy prolific. Each time Joseph returns to New York City he’s got new songs that sound of a piece with everything he’s done over a 30-plus-year career—and yet don’t repeat himself.

One of Joseph’s masterstrokes was finding bandmates who could be an extension of this personality and translate it into feral rock—jammy and shape-shifting. The Jackmormons, now again a trio after a stretch as a quartet, returned to Mercury Lounge Sunday night for a rare local long-play, meaning it wasn’t over and done within a tight hour and had ample room to stretch out, welcome friends and do what they do best: rough-scuffed folk rock played at times with Crazy Horse–like abandon and paint-stripping guitar. Whether it was the anthemic, gospel-y “Think on These Things” to open or the roiling “Soda Man” or a long, gnarly jam out of Bob Marley’s “Positive Vibration” that burrowed its way into the metal-scraping “Brother Number One,” every tune took its time, unhurried, and yeah, with incendiary guitar solos, chunky bass and crashing drums but none of it out of place or feeling extra. A lot of bands jam because they want to expand a song with improvisational solos or groupthink, but Jackmormons jams seem to go long because the emotional weight of a lot of this material commands a full workout. As an audience member, you’d rather be drained instead of left too heavy.

This show was a benefit for Joseph’s forthcoming trip to Iraq to work with refugee, cultural and educational organizations—a very Jerry Joseph think to do—and summoned some extra friends to accompany Joseph, bassist Steven James Wright and drummer Steve Drizos. Among them were the sage Mookie Siegel, dappling the music with heavenly organ and piano, and the ace Jamie McLean, bringing a red-meat blues-rock sensibility as a foil for Joseph’s own teeth-bared guitar playing. Especially remarkable was how well both of them became an extension of the Jackmormons, a trio that at times couldn’t seem to possibly hold more personality, and yet, there they were as part of the band, deep in its thrall. Potent stuff, you’d say with a chuckle, like calling an erupting volcano “potent stuff.” —Chad Berndtson | @Cberndtson

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More Than Just a Creative Name

January 24th, 2014

Hard Working Americans – The Bowery Ballroom – January23, 2014


Last night at The Bowery Ballroom was, as frontman Todd Snide mentioned several times, only the second gig the Hard Working Americans had ever played. Second gig together, that is: As individuals, the members—Snider, Dave Schools (Widespread Panic) on bass, Neal Casal (the Cardinals, Chris Robinson Brotherhood) on guitar, Chad Staehly (Great American Taxi’) on keyboards and Duane Trucks on drums—have logged probably closer to a zillion shows, and this kind of pedigree and professionalism made all the difference during show No. 2.

The supergroup primarily played songs off their self-titled debut, released earlier this week, comprised mostly of well-curated covers of the bluesy rock and roll variety. They opened, as the album does, with “Blackland Farmer,” a slow-build take that featured the thick-paste bottom layer of Schools, playing a four-string Fender, and the tasteful electric guitar chops of Casal. With Snider holding court up front, the music felt like what it was: old vets playing dress-up as up-and-comer kids. Each song seemed to unfold into multiple sections, like a sandwich cookie with a tasty substantial cover hiding a creamy, change-of-direction center. “Run a Mile” had the band clicking against a heavy duty bass beat with some counterpoint slide guitar, the whole band building into a slamming coda, each musician comfortably in his element.

Hard Working Americans had a lot of emotions in their arsenal, but they excelled with the dark and moody—as in the highlight, “I Don’t Have a Gun,” with low and slow smoking rock—and the high-energy ecstatic, as in “The Mountain Song” with its gliding cheerful Casal guitar solo and one to match from Staehly on organ, leading into a jam reminiscent of the Grateful Dead’s “I Know You Rider.” Snider was on point all night, seemingly happy to shed his singer-songwriter cloak and just “watch people dance.” Still, the encore brought out the best in him as he sang a great heartfelt version of Drivin’ N Cryin’s “Going Straight to Hell” and matched that with a terrific take on the Bottle Rockets’ “Welfare Music.” As the crowd thinned out, the band returned for a surprising second encore, Snider owning a take on Gillian Welch and David Rawlings’ “Wrecking Ball,” which also closes the album, the remaining audience swaying and singing along. It was pretty clear that the Hard Working Americans wasn’t just a clever name. —A. Stein

 

 

 

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Hard Working Americans Launch Tour Tomorrow at Bowery Ballroom

January 22nd, 2014

Singer-songwriter Todd Snider’s newest project is the folk-hippie supergroup Hard Working Americans, which sees him teamed up with Widespread Panic’s Dave Schools on bass, the Chris Robinson Brotherhood’s Neal Casal on guitar and vocals, Great American Taxi’s Chad Staehly on keys and Duane Trucks on drums. They came together last year to record an eponymous album of covers (stream it below) by the likes of Randy Newman, Lucinda Williams and Hayes Carll. Schools, who produced it with Snider in Bob Weir’s TRI Studios in Northern California, said to American Songwriter “that the idea was for a sort of dream-team band to basically deconstruct and reconstruct these cover songs in our own image.” Their LP came out yesterday and Hard Working Americans kick off a nine-date tour tomorrow night at The Bowery Ballroom.

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Sunday Shows Bring Out the Fervent Fans

September 13th, 2010

Stockholm Syndrome – Brooklyn Bowl – September 12, 2010

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Last night Brooklyn Bowl was perhaps the only place where you could simultaneously watch the football game, a Tim Burton flick, rock your ass off and bowl a few rounds (when you should have been in bed). Stockholm Syndrome—a supergroup/side project featuring Jerry Joseph, Dave Schools, Eric McFadden, Wally Ingram and Danny Louis—had the honor of extending the weekend. Watching these guys mesh together onstage was much like watching Donovan McNabb hand off to Clinton Portis while both wearing Redskins jerseys. With each musician coming from a distinct background, their joint effort was like a virtual Venn diagram with the music coming out of that small sliver of dark, overlapping area, which, in this case, was a vicious, funked-up rock and roll with Joseph spitting out powerful lyrics like they’d left a funny taste in his mouth.

The crowd was moderate in size but fanatical in spirit; the types of folk who would follow Joseph to the dankest Lowest East Side bar or Schools to the most backwater of Southern towns. There’s rarely a casual fan out on a Sunday night, and the audience was full of vigor watching Schools going chiropractic on his bass all night and Joseph and McFadden dueling on guitar. The two six-strings seemed like different instruments, with McFadden leaving muddy footprints behind each frenetic note played and Joseph, literally bouncing on bare feet, unleashing edgy but clean runs on his Fender. The spirit was loose and jammy, although the jams were direct and concise, lasting just long enough to breathe with democratic solos from all participants. —A. Stein

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