Tag Archives: Lenny Kravitz

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Spend the Weekend with Trombone Shorty at Terminal 5

October 10th, 2017

Troy Andrews is a trombone player from way back (although he also more than capably handles the trumpet, organ, drums and more). He graduated from the same New Orleans high school music program as Branford and Wynton Marsalis and Harry Connick Jr. Having grown up in a musical family in NOLA’s Treme neighborhood, Andrews, despite only being 31, has already been playing the trombone for more than 25 years. Getting his start at such a young age earned him the name Trombone Shorty: He first played Jazz Fest, taking the stage alongside Bo Diddley, when he was only four. And these days, he’s got the honor of closing out America’s best festival every year. But it’s Andrews’ talent, not his age (or his height), that’s the reason Trombone Shorty (above, covering the Meters’ “It Ain’t No Use” live in studio for KCRW FM) has toured the world, playing an exhilarating combination of funk, hip-hop, jazz and rock—not to mention working alongside the likes of Foo Fighters and Lenny Kravitz. His fourth studio album, Parking Lot Symphony (stream it below), and first on Blue Note Records, arrived this past April, earning him comparisons to Stevie Wonder and Earth, Wind & Fire. AllMusic said he “fully embraces the organic ’70s-style R&B he’s heretofore only touched on.” Further adding that the album is one of his “most balanced productions, equal parts New Orleans R&B sophistication and loose, block-party fun.” That fun is what makes Trombone Shorty such an engaging, don’t-miss entertainer and performer. Catch him live at Terminal 5 on Friday and Saturday. L.A. four-piece Vintage Trouble open both shows.

Kamasi Washington Collaborator Miles Mosley at Rough Trade NYC

May 25th, 2017

When it comes to a wide range of music, from jazz to rock to soul to hip-hop, Mike Mosley does it all: singing, writing, composing, band-leading, producing and playing multiple instruments, most notably (and inventively) the standup bass, which he describes “as if Jimi Hendrix played upright bass in Prince’s band.” So far, Mosley (above, performing “Abraham”) is best known for his work with others, featuring on big albums like Chris Cornell’s Carry On, Kendrick Lamar’s Pimp a Butterfly and Kamasi Washington’s The Epic, and as part of the influential Los Angeles jazz-fusion collective West Coast Get Down—who’ve been compared to the Wu-Tang Clan—since Mosley, Washington and others were just young teens. So when it came time to do what would become the acclaimed triple album The Epic, as part of a month of 14-hour recording sessions, various West Coast Get Down members pitched in and all came out with new albums, Washington’s getting released first. Earlier this year, Mosley’s solo debut, Uprising (stream it below), arrived second, sounding like “Lenny Kravitz backed by a killer jazz crew,” according to Rolling Stone. “Here, Mosley leads the troupe on a funk, rock and jazz excursion marked by his honest and emotive vocals and deeply metaphorical lyrics.” And just like with Washington’s, Mosley’s work is best experienced live. So go see Miles Mosley and West Coast Get Down tomorrow night at Rough Trade NYC. Antibalas bassist Nikhil P. Yerawadekar & Low Mentality open the show.

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Kick Off the Weekend with Gabriel Garzón-Montano on Friday Night

July 27th, 2016

Gabriel Garzón-Montano is a musician’s musician: He sings, he composes and he plays the violin, guitar, drums, piano and bass, plus he’s even been sampled by Drake. Following the release of the soul-and R&B-inflected Bishouné: Alma del Huila (stream it below) in 2014—about which, CMJ opined, “This promising young artist touches on love and loss, and always buttressed with a sly bit of vintage style”—the multitalented New Yorker toured across Europe opening for Lenny Kravitz. But the energetic performer (above, doing “Everything Is Everything” for Brownswood Basement Sessions) is the headliner when he stays home in Brooklyn to play Music Hall of Williamsburg on Friday night. Nick Hakim and Space People open the show.

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Trombone Shorty, Soulive and Anders Osborne Tonight at SummerStage

July 22nd, 2013

It’s already been quite a year for Trombone Shorty. The party-starting trombone virtuoso has performed at the 2013 Green Inaugural Ball, appeared in a documentary about Lenny Kravitz and, following in the footsteps of Louis Armstrong, Professor Longhair and Fats Domino, he was featured on the 2013 commemorative souvenir envelope for the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation—and Shorty topped all of that with the honor of closing out this year’s Jazz Fest. Of course, none of those things were in New York City, but tonight at SummerStage in Central Park, Trombone Shorty (above, doing “Do to Me” on Conan) headlines a fantastic lineup rounded out by soul-funk-fusion trio Soulive and NOLA (by way of Sweden) guitar god Anders Osborne. This is one not to miss. So don’t!

 

 

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Trombone Shorty Knows What the Crowd Wants

December 10th, 2012

Trombone Shorty – Terminal 5 – December 8, 2012


Trombone Shorty, aka Troy Andrews, has a reputation as an electric performer. And why shouldn’t he? Andrews hails from New Orleans, where his grandfather, Jesse Hill, played with such legends as Professor Longhair and Huey “Piano” Smith. His older brother, James Andrews, is an accomplished trumpet player who has gigged with the likes of Quincy JonesDizzy Gillespie and Dr. John. Shorty, for his part, impressed at an early age. At six years old, he was leading his own band, and in his late teens and early twenties he had already performed with Lenny KravitzGreen Day and U2. He’s also made cameos on Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip and, of course, HBO’s Treme, which chronicles post-Katrina New Orleans.

But a solid résumé means nothing without an equally solid performance, and Trombone Shorty blew this criterion out of the water on Saturday night at Terminal 5. From the very first note, Andrews and his band, Orleans Avenue, sounded tight, funky and heavy all at once. Each player throughout the night demonstrated his overwhelming chops. Pete Murano absolutely shredded on guitar, displaying an incredible proficiency within range of styles from funk to jazz to metal, and “Uncle” Dan Oestreicher shined on a cover of Nirvana’s “In Bloom.” Andrews, though, is a wizard onstage, audibly and visually. He switched with ease between trombone and trumpet, absolutely destroying every song in his path. He also made sure all eyes were on him, often throwing his arms in the air like Maximus in Gladiator. In truth, we were quite entertained.

It’s entirely clear that Andrews knows exactly what the crowd wants. He teased and covered eclectic songs like “Minnie the Moocher” and “I Got a Woman.” The band expertly weaved through a hip-hop medley of “Slow Motion,” “Shake Ya Ass,” “Let Me Clear My Throat” and “Give It Away” to choreographed stepping, complete with head whipping, which the crowd aptly mimicked. When the group was called back for an encore, they played New Orleans favorites “When the Saints Go Marching In” and “Treme Song.” “Who dat!” he screamed as the New Orleans–tinged audience responded with their hometown’s unofficial cheer. On the very last tune, everyone switched instruments and played something ostensibly outside of their comfort zone: Andrews moved to drums, Murano blew a sax, bassist Mike Ballard picked up the trumpet and so on. It was as if they needed to prove to us that, without a doubt, they could do anything. That wasn’t necessary, though. They had already done more than enough to satisfy. —Alex Kapelman

Photos courtesy of Sean O’Kane | seanokanephoto.com