Tag Archives: Music

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S. Carey Thrills Rough Trade NYC with New Music on Thursday Night

March 30th, 2018

S. Carey – Rough Trade NYC – March 29, 2018


Growing up in Wisconsin, Sean Carey was literally born into music as a son of a music teacher and singer. Upon graduating from the college in 2007, he was in the right place at the right time having heard a little album by fellow Wisconsinan Justin Vernon and was inspired to learn all of the songs. He got the opportunity to sing for Vernon backstage and then his acceptance into Bon Iver was complete. A musician in his own right, Carey wrote his first album, All We Grow, under the moniker S. Carey, during a break in touring. After the release of his debut in the fall of 2010, Carey joined the Tallest Man on Earth as his opener. Since then, Carey has put out his third record, Hundred Acres, last month, and he landed at a sold-out Rough Trade NYC last night to serenade fans with the new material.

Following her opening slot, the very talented Gordi joined Carey and his band for the headlining set. Fitting in like she’d been in the group all along, her vocals nicely rounded out their harmonies. “Hideout” and the new single “Yellowstone” kicked off the show, and most of the set was comprised of the latest release. Carey took his comfortable seat behind the drum kit first on “Emery,” but would swap with guitarist Zach Hanson throughout the night. The evening’s supporting-player award went to Ben Lester on pedal steel, as his mastery of the instrument wove a sultry country twang throughout.

While Carey was tuning his guitar, Lester led the band in a rendition of Santo & Johnny’s “Sleep Walk,” which instantly drew applause from the crowd. A trio of back-catalog gems, the Yosemite-inspired “Fleeting Light,” a bittersweet “Alpenglow” and oldie but goodie “In the Stream,” came toward the tail end of the set to the glee of longtime fans. An encore included Gordi’s “I’m Done” with the frontman dueting from behind the drums, and a cover of Tom Waits’s “Take It With Me” by a solo Carey. —Sharlene Chiu

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Dashboard Confessional – Brooklyn Steel – March 29, 2018

March 30th, 2018


Photos courtesy of Brian C. Reilly | www.briancreilly.com

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Albert Hammond Jr. – Brooklyn Steel – March 28, 2018

March 29th, 2018


Photos courtesy of Chloe Gifkins | www.chloegifkinsphoto.com

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Get Ready Because Noisey Weekend: Brooklyn Is Coming Your Way

March 29th, 2018


The end of this workweek isn’t just a regular weekend, and it’s not because of Easter and Passover. The Bowery Presents has teamed up with Noisey to bring eight diverse shows to four Brooklyn venues that you won’t want to miss. It’s Noisey Weekend: Brooklyn.
 

Brooklyn Steel

Friday: Los Angeles rapper Lil Xan (above, performing “Betrayed”) alongside $teven Cannon and Lil Gnar
Saturday: L.A. hip-hop producer Tokimonsta (below, stream Lune Rouge) with Leikeli47 and Deem Spencer

 

Music Hall of Williamsburg

Friday: Brooklyn rapper Young M.A. (above, the video for “I Get the Bag Freestyle”) alongside Creek Boyz, Yerr Eli, Koreleone and Funk Flex
Saturday: Atmospheric-psychedleic act Amen Dunes (below, stream Love) with Mike, plus a Margaret Chardiet DJ set

 

Brooklyn Bowl

Friday: Acclaimed Americana-Southern rockers Drive-By Truckers (above, performing “What It Means”) alongside Heartless Bastards frontwoman Erika Wennerstrom
Saturday: Dean Ween Group (below, stream Rock2) with Delicate Steve and Keith Kenny

 

Rough Trade NYC

Friday: California blues-rocker Hanni El Khatib (above, doing “Paralyzed”) alongside the Buttertones and Fascinations Grand Chorus
Saturday: Los Angeles (by way of Chicago) MC Open Mike Eagle (below, stream Brick Body Kids Still Daydream) with Tierra Whack

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Darlingside Embrace Four-Part Harmonies at Rough Trade NYC

March 29th, 2018

Darlingside – Rough Trade NYC – March 28, 2018


The power of multiples was on display last night in Williamsburg. Instead of playing just one show, Boston quartet Darlingside decided two would be better and so we found ourselves at a late set at Rough Trade NYC on Wednesday night. Because it was the later show, they announced it would be the “loose” one, and the crowd definitely did their best to lighten the mood with plenty of whoops and call-outs. Still, with the way the band played, sharp and composed, the music felt anything but loose. The group employed multiple permutations of sounds and instruments over a variety of genres and influences to deliver a set that could best be described as harmonious.

Early on, “Eschaton”—off their new album, Extralife—combined violin and guitar with a harrowing synthesizer to create a cool room-filling effect. But it was the vocal harmonies of the group’s four voices that enraptured the audience, almost unnaturally pure, if you didn’t see them singing, engaging as a group around a single microphone, you might not even believe it was real. Those voices echoed a multitude of influences, evoking the past and the present, the Beach Boys, the Postal Service, Sufjan Stevens.

The combinations of instruments worked different moods and feels into the set. “Hold Your Head Up High” pulsed with violin and kick drum into ethereal spaces, while “Harrison Ford” felt light and limber on a mandolin melody and “Orion” was pensive in cello, violin, bass and banjo. While the band stayed loose, the music was tight, instruments and voices locked in like the perfect studio take. This extended even to the lights, the band bringing their own rig. When they sang about “white horses,” the stage was awash in the brightest white, and when they sang about the “yellow sun,” well-timed rays of yellow streamed between their faces. At times, the lights cast patterns on the ceiling, flowers and squiggles, transforming the room into an otherworldly place to match the voices resonating off the walls, a harmonious multiplicity of sight and sound. —A. Stein | @Neddyo

 

 

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The Strypes Do Their Part to Keep Rock Alive at Rough Trade NYC

March 28th, 2018

The Strypes – Rough Trade NYC – March 27, 2018

Photos courtesy of Silvia Saponaro | www.saponarophotography.com

During the initial explosion of British rock bands in the early ’60s, it was pretty common for young groups to begin as carbon copies of the influences they were desperately trying to emulate. The first few Stones records, after all, leaned heavily on Chicago-blues covers, and the majority of the Who’s first album was a love letter to Motown. Each of these bands had templates they referenced before they mastered their crafts and created something completely different. The Strypes, out of Cavan, Ireland, started similarly. They experienced early success thanks to their throwback style that owed a huge debt to the early British pub-rock scene that predated the punk explosion of ’77. Bands like Dr. Feelgood, Nick Lowe and Dave EdmundsRockpile, and Graham Parker and the Rumour were all the template for them—and what made it most impressive was that these kids were all in their early teens. And man could they play.

Their newest album, last year’s Spitting Image, finds the Strypes expanding their sound a little bit more with a focus on lyric-heavy pop-conscious songcraft—not unlike their heroes Lowe, Parker and Elvis Costello. And it brought them to Rough Trade NYC last night in Williamsburg. To put it lightly: I was not prepared for what I was about to witness. The band tore into their set by absolutely pulverizing the classic blues standard “Rollin’ and Tumblin’.” They’re such a tightly wound force with drummer Evan Walsh thunderously dismantling his kit with each hit, bassist Peter O’Hanlon constantly pacing and jumping all over the stage, lead guitarist Josh McClorely stoically unleashing one perfect solo after another and lead singer Ross Farrelly—clad in a workman’s jumpsuit and big black sunglasses—commanding the crowd with a calm and cool I’ve-seen-it-all demeanor. The Strypes had it down, an image they could present and the skills and tunes to back it up.

The set flew by as they played material from across their catalog. You could tell each era of the young band’s career was specifically defined, as the pop hooks of new songs like “Behind Closed Doors” jumped out in the middle of their older bluesy rave-ups. The Strypes played for about an hour and a half before coming out for a brief encore that began with an incendiary version of Nick Lowe’s “Heart of the City.” If you are familiar with the Rockpile’s live versions of this song, then you know that I am not saying it lightly that the Strypes did it justice. The final number of the night was their early hit “Blue Collar Jane” before the band bid Brooklyn goodnight and turned off their blazing hot amplifiers. Maybe rock isn’t dead after all? —Pat King | @MrPatKing

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Dan Auerbach – Brooklyn Steel – March 27, 2018

March 28th, 2018


(Dan Auerbach & the Easy Eye Sound Revue play the Capitol Theatre tonight.)

Photos courtesy of Gregg Greenwood | gregggreenwood.com

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Albert Hammond Jr. Comes Home to Play Brooklyn Steel on Wednesday

March 27th, 2018

Albert Hammond Jr. (above, performing “Muted Beatings” on Conan) first came to fame around the turn of the millennium as the rhythm guitarist for the Strokes. But the son of singer-songwriter Albert Hammond (of “To All the Girls I’ve Loved Before” fame, among many other credits) has been releasing his own music—which according to AllMusic, “diverged entirely from the garage sensations, with jaunty, Beatlesque pop”—since his first solo effort, Yours to Keep (stream it below), debuted in 2006. “This album is far better than it has any right to be; an intimate, frequently beautiful and consistently surprising record that gets better with every listen,” said NME. He’s remained busy ever since, recording and touring with the Strokes while still finding time to release and play more of his own music. To that end: Albert Hammond Jr.’s fourth studio long-player, Francis Trouble (stream it below), came out a few weeks ago to rave reviews. According to Pitchfork, “The guitarist continues his 2010s hot streak with some of the brightest, scrappiest music he’s ever made as a solo artist,” while Rolling Stone called it “his best music in a decade.” But how does it sound live, you ask? Find out for yourself tomorrow night at Brooklyn Steel. Los Angeles psychedelic-soul five-piece the Marías open the show.

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Grow a Pair: Win Free Tickets to See James Bay on 4/3

March 27th, 2018

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English singer-songwriter James Bay’s new album, Electric Light, doesn’t drop until May, but he’s already out on the road crisscrossing North America in support of it, which brings him to Brooklyn Steel next Tuesday night. The show is sold out, but if you don’t already have tickets, you can still try to Grow a Pair of them from The House List. It’s easy. Just fill out the form below, making sure to include your full name, email address, which show you’re trying to win tickets to (James Bay, 4/3) and a brief message explaining who you think will win the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament. Eddie Bruiser, who will neither confirm nor deny that he’s got at least two month’s rent riding on the outcome, will notify the winner by Friday afternoon. Good luck.

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Lostboycrow Plays Public Arts with Prelow Tomorrow Night

March 27th, 2018

As Lostboycrow (above, doing “All My Lives at Once” for Jam in the Van), Chris Danks has been releasing introspective-dance singles at the intersection of R&B, pop and electronic music, highlighted by his soulful croon, since moving to L.A. several years ago. More recently, he’s patiently put out a three-part LP, Traveler—with Traveler: The First Legend (stream it below) and Traveler: The Second Legend (stream it below) arriving last year while Traveler: The Third Legend (stream it below) dropped last month. “For better and for worse everything is consumed instantly and with such accessibility. The most logical thing in my mind, being an artist who just wants to weave stories into albums, was to release EPs with singles that would make up a much larger story,” he tells the Young Folks. “A compromise for lack of a better word but also a way to keep releasing music constantly throughout the year and still give listeners those stories and colors connecting it all.” The engaging live performer has teamed up with electro-pop duo Prelow—onetime NYU classmates Jesse Aicher and Matt Walsh—to hit the road, and they come to the Lower East Side to play Public Arts on Wednesday night.

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MGMT – Brooklyn Steel – March 25, 2018

March 26th, 2018


Photos courtesy of Adela Loconte | adelaloconte.com

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Marlon Williams Brings His Stellar Second Album to Williamsburg

March 26th, 2018

Influenced by bluegrass, country, pop, rock and soul, New Zealand singer-songwriter Marlon Williams (above, performing “Nobody Gets What They Want Anymore” live on KCRW FM) has been making dark, atmospheric Americana music as a genre-spanning solo artist since his self-titled debut LP (stream it below) arrived two winters ago. “The national acclaim he’s had is hardly surprising: It only takes a split-second to be won over by the power of his unusually well-crafted country voice. He recalls the likes of Elvis, and Willie Nelson and Neil Young without aping any of them,” raved Drowned in Sound. While Paste added: “The fact that this record was made in the Aughts and not in the ’60s is mind-boggling. Williams’ voice may as well have time-traveled and spent an extended vacation with classic rock’s finest. It’s an album that leaves you wanting another nine songs so you can hear the end of the ‘story.’” Following a breakup, he returned last month with his second solo studio album, Make Way for Love (stream it below). “Williams explores the full gamut of emotions, and that rich and resonant voice is the perfect vehicle,” said Exclaim. “The result is a stunning work that will draw you back to repeated, if oft intense, listening.” The people at American Songwriter were also impressed: “It’s a bold, eclectic and audacious approach to the bulging catalog of breakup ruminations; one that emerges from the crowded field and shows Marlon Williams’ talents are just beginning to blossom.” In mid-tour form, he rolls into Brooklyn to play Music Hall of Williamsburg tomorrow night. Another New Zealand singer-songwriter, Tiny Ruins, opens the show. (Marlon Williams also opens for Brandi Carlile at the Beacon Theatre 4/5-7.)

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Miguel – Terminal 5 – March 23, 2018

March 26th, 2018


Photos courtesy of DeShaun Craddock | dac.photography

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Lucius Soar at Town Hall on Thursday Night

March 23rd, 2018

Lucius – Town Hall – March 22, 2018


Jess Wolfe and Holly Laessig of the band Lucius struck quite an arresting image onstage at Town Hall during last night’s sold-out show, with their matching platinum-blonde wigs aglow under a large, color-changing neon sign bearing the band’s name. Incredible aesthetics aside, Lucius’ real impact comes the moment that Wolfe and Laessing begin to sing. As they stepped up to a shared microphone center stage to perform their first song, “Go Home,” they immediately created a sense of intimacy within the large concert hall.

That sense of intimacy is a key element to the band’s new record, Nudes, featuring acoustic and reimagined versions of songs from their catalog, along with some covers, which the musicians recorded with the goal of drawing listeners in and furthering the connection between the artist and listener. Last night, songs like “Tempest,” “Right Down the Line” and “Turn It Around,” were adorned by nothing more than acoustic guitars and drums, with Wolfe and Laessig’s unison vocals and harmonies soaring throughout the room. Cover songs were also prominently featured in the set list, including a sweet version of Elvis Presley’s “Can’t Help Falling in Love,” plus the Kinks’ “Strangers” and Daniel Johnston’s “True Love Will Find You in the End,” which the band blended into a rendition of their own “Two of Us on the Run.”

It was clear that the commitment to creating a connection with the audience was foremost on the band’s mind, and Wolfe and Laessig also devoted several minutes during the show to speak frankly to the crowd, expressing their gratitude, reflecting on the importance of their collaboration in their career as a band, and sharing some personal experiences, both happy and sad, that had recently touched their lives. By night’s end, Lucius seemed to have achieved their goal—delivering an impactful performance in sound, style and sentiment. —Alena Kastin | @AlenaK

 

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Moby – Rough Trade NYC – March 20, 2018

March 21st, 2018


Photos courtesy of Adela Loconte | adelaloconte.com