Tag Archives: Nathan Bowles

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Don’t Miss Kurt Vile and the Violators Tomorrow at Terminal 5

December 27th, 2016

Ever since amicably parting ways with the War on Drugs, following the band’s tour in support of their debut album, Wagonwheel Blues, singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Kurt Vile has made a name for himself with a series of stellar EPs and LPs—that have blossomed from fuzzy, lo-fi affairs into spacious, atmospheric endeavors—done solo and as Kurt Vile and the Violators. Wakin on a Pretty Daze (stream it below), out in 2013, built on his earlier work and became a word-of-mouth hit. And with widespread acclaim, Vile’s most recent full-length, B’lieve I’m Goin Down… (stream it below), made waves among critics and fans alike when it arrived last fall. The Guardian called it a “terrific slow-burner,” and the A.V. Club said it’s “easily Vile’s masterpiece to date…. Kurt Vile loosens up as he continues his astounding roll.” And while Kurt Vile and the Violators (above, performing “Pretty Pimpin”) have earned comparisons to Neil Young and Crazy Horse for their recorded material, it’s probably even more apt for their fiery live performances. Catch one of those terrific performances tomorrow night at Terminal 5. Brooklyn psych-folk outfit Woods and multi-instrumentalist Nathan Bowles open the show.

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Guitar Maestro Steve Gunn Celebrates New Album in Brooklyn

October 13th, 2014

Steve Gunn – Rough Trade NYC – October 12, 2014

sg-in-the-park-2There was an old kind of guitar nerd who would go cross-eyed from a solo of Malmsteenian technical skill muttering in awe, “How does he do that?” But nowadays, there’s a new kind of guitar nerd that was out in full force at the Steve Gunn show last night at Rough Trade NYC. These ladies and gentlemen still appreciate the technical skill, which was to be found aplenty throughout Gunn’s set, but along with and really beyond the proficiency, there is an emotional connection that goes deeper. Gunn and his soul-probing band seemed to be performing therapy by six-string, wowing the crowd and then asking, “And how does that make you feel?”

He was an unassuming guitar maestro in denim, his banter was almost accidental and his vocals were understated (part mumble, part moan), but got the job done and counterbalanced the music behind them. The set began with a quick in-line sound check that itself was pretty great, reminiscent of a 1973 Grateful Dead jam, the band tossing around a melody like no big thing. Once the set got swinging, though, it was a cascade of musical emotion, jubilant, cathartic, evocative. The songs were mostly from Gunn’s excellent new album, Way Out Weather—with one or two of the longer jams drawn from older material—the show serving as a release party (with Gunn the type of musician who drinks water at his own Sunday night celebration). Each seemed to evoke a feeling, from the nostalgia of “Wildwood” to the bickering of “Milly’s Garden.” The latter, Gunn explained, was basically about an asshole neighbor, and his guitar and lap steel went back and forth in musical argument, building to an angry crescendo.

Later, those same two instruments overlapped again on “Way Out Weather.” This time the guitars felt like they were in deep, respectful conversation, the jam moving from quiet and beautiful to fiery, the whole band expertly coming together. Whatever the feelings evoked, it was Gunn’s guitar as the source. Impossible amounts of notes poured from his instrument, acoustic and electric, his fingers moving effortlessly up and down his fretboard, like a minimalist masseuse who knows the exact location of each melody’s pressure points. The notes layered into nonlinear masterpieces that stretched out in time and filled the room with a steady hypnosis. After the “session,” a big hug felt appropriate, but a deserved ovation and a soul-searching encore did the trick as well.  —A. Stein