Tag Archives: The Midnight Organ Fight

cat_preview

Frightened Rabbit Celebrate a Milestone Anniversary in Williamsburg

February 26th, 2018

Frightened Rabbit – Music Hall of Williamsburg – February 24, 2018

Photos courtesy of Silvia Saponaro | www.saponarophotography.com

After their first LP, Sing the Greys, didn’t make a lot of noise, Frightened Rabbit’s breakthrough release, The Midnight Organ Fight, arrived a decade ago as a low-key masterpiece of a breakup album. Without any marketing push, its tales of love lost, failure and self-loathing slowly spread by word-of-mouth. Each song a lonely, emotional gut punch that doubles as a catchy, danceable earworm. The raw, vulnerable words sound so intimate through headphones in a solitary listen but when heard live bloom into a big communal catharsis amidst a flurry of guitars and onlookers belting out dark lyrics—like “I think I’ll save suicide for another day” or “It takes more than fucking someone you don’t know to keep warm”—like they’re the only ones in the room.

Celebrating The Midnight Organ Fight’s 10th anniversary, the Scottish five-piece—Scott Hutchison (vocals and guitar), Grant Hutchison (drums and vocals), Billy Kennedy (bass, keys and vocals), Andy Monaghan (guitar and keys) and Simon Liddell (guitar and keys)—rolled into Brooklyn on Saturday to perform it in order. But first they did four songs from other albums, including The Winter of Mixed Drinks“Swim Until You Can’t See Land,” which earned the night’s first hoots and hollers. The loud crowd eagerly sang along to Organ Fight’s opener, “Modern Leper,” drinks held aloft at “You must be a masochist.” The affable frontman’s Glaswegian-accented banter had everyone listening with rapt attention between songs, and at times he conducted the crowd with his hand and guitar. “You guys are fucking great. Thank you for this. It’s amazing how happy a sad album can make you,” he said, laughingly adding, “but to each their own.”

After spirited takes on “My Backwards Walk” and “Keep Yourself Warm,” plus the album’s second short instrumental, “Extrasupervery,” done in darkness onstage, the singer did a solo take on the evocative “Poke” with everyone in the room singing at full volume. The full band returned for “Floating in the Forth” and “Who’d You Kill Now?”—“In a normal live show we wouldn’t be so stupid as to put these songs together,” said Scott—to finish The Midnight Organ Fight. After a short break, they returned for a three-song encore, capped off by The Winter of Mixed Drinks“The Loneliness and the Scream” and its stomping, clapping, sing-along finale. It was the kind of shared personal experience you hope for every time you leave the house to see a band. —R. Zizmor | @Hand_Dog

Contest

Grow a Pair: Win Free Tickets to See Frightened Rabbit on 2/24

February 20th, 2018

grow_03_sm

Scottish five-piece Frightened Rabbit are celebrating the 10th anniversary of their breakthrough album, The Midnight Organ Fight, with a world tour that brings them to Brooklyn to play Music Hall of Williamsburg on Saturday night. The show sold out immediately, but if you didn’t get any tickets, you may be in luck because The House List is giving away two of them. Want to go? Try to Grow a Pair. Just fill out the form below, making sure to include your full name, email address, which show you’re trying to win tickets to (Frightened Rabbit, 2/24) and a brief message explaining your favorite song on The Midnight Organ Fight. Eddie Bruiser, who always listens to it start to finish, will notify the winner by Friday afternoon. Good luck.

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Subject

Your Message

cat_preview

Five Questions with Frightened Rabbit’s Scott Hutchison

May 26th, 2017

For more than a decade, Frightened RabbitScott Hutchison (vocals and guitar), brother Grant Hutchison (drums), Billy Kennedy (guitar and bass), Andy Monaghan (guitar and keys) and Simon Liddell (guitar)—have been making global noise on the strength of soaring, melancholic arena rock with resonant lyrics that stay with you. Since then, the Scottish rockers (above, doing “I Wish That I Was Sober” live for KTBG FM) have become as equally well known for their fiery live performances as for their recorded output. The band’s fifth LP, Painting of a Panic Attack (stream it below), which came out last spring, was produced by the National’s Aaron Dessner. “Though Hutchison’s talent for crafting beautifully dark stories hasn’t changed much, Frightened Rabbit’s sound most definitely has, thanks in part to Dessner behind the mixing desk,” said the Line of Best Fit. “The usual aching melancholy that has the capability to flip to captivating exuberance at a moment’s notice is ever present but Dessner’s experience with the National gives a whole new, often gloomy, depth to their sound.” Frightened Rabbit play Brooklyn Steel next Tuesday. And ahead of the band’s North American tour, The House List contacted the frontman to answer Five Questions.

Painting of a Panic Attack features electronics more than your other albums. Was that a conscious choice ahead of time or is that just the way things went as you wrote? I think we all wanted to move in that direction a little more with this album, but it wasn’t forced. Through necessity, I was figuring out how to use music software for the first time and exploring the raft of sounds held in Logic. Andy has always been interested in electronic music, so for him it was a natural place to go.

So many Frightened Rabbit songs are anthemic, somehow sounding like upbeat tales even when they’re about downer topics—not many bands could get crowds to lustily belt out lyrics about loneliness or “It takes more than fucking someone you don’t know to keep warm.” Is that something you set out to do? I’ve always been looking for that contrast within the songs. From very early on I knew I wanted the melodic qualities of the music to act like an open door, warm and welcoming, sometimes anthemic. Then once you’re in the room, you hear all these dark lines and it might be a little jarring, but we’ve already shut the door behind you. Ha!

What’s your process for recording new material? Is everything written and fleshed out in advance of going into the studio? Or do you just have sketches and ideas of songs ready to go? We’re usually relatively well prepared but recently we’ve enjoyed developing songs from rough sketches in the studio. Being overprepared or too certain of the songs can result in losing those little moments of studio magic. That’s our excuse for not knowing what the fuck we’re doing.

Once a track is recorded and released, does it stay like that in perpetuity, or do songs grow as you play them live? They always grow, they absolutely should. Often it’s just through boredom within the band, but sometimes the audience drives it forward. I never thought “The Loneliness and the Scream” would be a set-closer, but that had nothing to do with us. It was the crowds latching on to a melody and sticking with it. That was a surprise.

Do you have any crutches when writing a song—are there certain words or styles you feel you lean on too much? Absolutely. It’s a big danger and I’ve caught myself repeating themes again and again. However, I do think it’s important to develop your own world within the songs, and repeated lyrical themes are a big part of that. And the thing is: I am still a bit of a drunken failure. I’m not making it up. —R. Zizmor | @Hand_Dog