Tag Archives: Timber Timbre

cat_reviews

Chad VanGaalen’s Unique Voice Is in Fine Form at Rough Trade NYC

December 7th, 2017

Chad VanGaalen – Rough Trade NYC – December 6, 2017


Since 2004, Canadian singer-songwriter Chad VanGaalen has been churning out records on his own terms. He generally plays all of the instruments, records the songs and even does the artwork for his albums. In fact, he may be more well known for his art as he is an award-winning illustrator and has animated all of his own music videos, plus some for other bands like J Mascis, Timber Timbre and Love as Laughter. Both VanGaalen’s music and his artwork take on a morbid sensibility as you can spot one of his songs right away from its detuned guitars, homespun recording quality and his high voice that often quivers like Neil Young’s ghost haunting an off season waterpark. He is truly a unique voice in today’s indie-rock scene and has put out a tremendous body of work that deserves more recognition. Playing New York City is generally pretty rare for VanGaalen, so his sold-out stop at Rough Trade NYC last night seemed all the more special.

The soul and post-punk fusion group Un Blonde opened the show, led by the eccentric guitarist and singer Jean-Sebastien Audet, who would stop his band at the drop of a dime with a single gesture and could ring out every ounce of soul from each song’s melody. They were extremely tight and VanGaalen even joined them toward the end of their set on flute for an extended free-jazz jam. And as soon as he returned for the headlining set, you could tell VanGaalen and his band were there to have fun. “We went to an arcade and got fucking wasted,” he joked with a playful smirk on his face. “We didn’t even play pinball! So is it cool if we just chill out?” From that declaration, it would be safe to think that this might be an off night for VanGaalen and Co. As It turned out, it was anything but.

The band played loose and heavy giving his bedroom DIY songs Sonic Youth–styled makeovers. VanGaalen’s voice was also in tremendous form, eliciting chills when he hit the height of his register. The singer-songwriter treated the crowd to much of his new album, Light Information, as well as career-spanning hits like “Clinically Dead” and “Heavy Stones.” VanGaalen’s main set ended with an extended noise jam during the Diaper Island track “Peace on the Rise,” which felt transcendent and inspired. For the encore, he played two numbers off his 2008 album, Soft Airplane, “City of Electric Light” and “Rabid Bits of Time.” The latter’s chorus, “No one knows where we go/ When we’re dead or when we’re dreaming,” sounded more triumphant than on record and was a truly powerful way to end the night. —Pat King | @MrPatKing

cat_preview

Don’t Miss These Northside Festival Shows This Week in Brooklyn

June 5th, 2017

Beginning on Wednesday, the ninth annual Northside Festival will bring thousands of people to Brooklyn—specifically Williamsburg and Greenpoint—“to uncover the future of music, innovation and content.” And with music as part of the equation, you just know that The Bowery Presents is gonna be involved. Although Mary Timony playing Helium at Rough Trade NYC on Thursday and Big Thief (above, performing “Paul” for NPR Music at this year’s SXSW) at Rough Trade NYC on Friday are already sold out, fortunately some tickets still remain for these other stellar shows:

Thursday
Mild High Club (with Cut Worms and Aerial East) at Music Hall of Williamsburg

Friday
The Pains of Being Pure at Heart with Beverly and Ablebody at Music Hall of Williamsburg on Friday

Saturday
An Evening with Big Thief and Friends (Friends = Twain, Relatives and the Brother Brothers) at Park Church Co-op

Timber Timbre and Ohtis at Music Hall of Williamsburg

Lower Dens performing songs from ABBA’s Gold: Greatest Hits, Tony Molina performing songs from Dinosaur Jr.’s You’re Living All Over Me and Tredici Bacci String Quartet performing songs from Koji Kondo’s Super Mario Bros. soundtrack

cat_preview

Five Questions with…Taylor Kirk

October 7th, 2009

Taylor Kirk

Taylor Kirk is a talented singer, songwriter and guitarist, and his blues-folk band, Timber Timbre, sounds dark and ragged. He put out Timber Timbre’s first two albums on his own, and the third one, Timber Timbre—released in January by the indie record label Out of This Spark—has earned him much acclaim. In advance of Timber Timbre’s first ever show in NYC, at Mercury Lounge on Saturday, Kirk checked in with The House List to answer five questions.

Which band have you seen play live the most often (excluding bands you’ve toured with)?
I think it must be the Sadies, from Toronto. Although it’s been a long time since I saw them last, but for a few years I would see them every time I had a chance. They’re the only band I ever danced to.

Do you have any crutches when writing a song—are there certain words or styles you feel you lean on too much?
I think I rely too heavily on minor chords in my songwriting. Especially E minor.

What’s your favorite place in New York City to hang out? And do you ever feel like you could live here?
I don’t know the city well enough. I’ve only visited a few times. I don’t think I have the energy required to live in NYC—I couldn’t take the pace. But I like visiting.

Do you have to be depressed to write a sad song? Do you have to be in love to write a love song? Is a song better when it really happened to you?
I don’t think that songwriting needs to be so literal or earnest in order to be honest and or successful.

Your after-party is at Hi-Fi, the Avenue A bar known for its endless jukebox, and The House List gives you a buck. Which three songs are you playing?
“Real Talk” by R. Kelly, “I Put a Spell on You” by Creedence Clearwater Revival and “American Girl” by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. —R. Zizmor